toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Dutcher, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bird Notes from Long Island, N. Y Type Journal Article
  Year 1884 Publication The Auk Abbreviated Journal The Auk  
  Volume 1 Issue 2 Pages 174-179  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract For the purpose of determining the date of migration, the species migrating, and the numbers that are destroyed by striking a light house during a spring and fall migration, I have for the past two years received all the birds killed by flying against Fire Island Light.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-8038 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2290  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Willmott, N. J., Henneken, J., Elgar, M. A., & Jones, T. M. doi  openurl
  Title Guiding lights: Foraging responses of juvenile nocturnal orb‐web spiders to the presence of artificial light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 125 Issue 5 Pages 289-287  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract The reach of artificial light at night (ALAN) is growing rapidly around the globe, including the increasing use of energy‐efficient LED lights. Many studies document the physiological costs of light at night, but far fewer have focused on the potential benefits for nocturnal insectivores and the likely ecological consequences of shifts in predator–prey relationships. We investigated the effects of ALAN on the foraging behaviour and prey capture success in juvenile Australian garden orb‐web spiders (Eriophora biapicata). Laboratory experiments demonstrated that juvenile spiders were attracted to LED lights when choosing foraging sites, but prey availability was a stronger cue for remaining in a foraging site. Field experiments revealed a significant increase in prey capture rates for webs placed near LED lights. This suggests that any physiological costs of light at night may be offset by the foraging benefits, perhaps partially explaining recently observed increases in the size, fecundity and abundance of some orb‐web spider species in urban environments. Our results highlight the potential long‐term consequences of night lighting in urban ecosystems, through the impact of orb‐web spiders on insect populations.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2304  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Frank, T. M., Gabbert, W. C., Chaves-Campos, J., & LaVal, R. K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of artificial lights on foraging of insectivorous bats in a Costa Rican cloud forest Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Tropical Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 8-17  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Determining the effects of light pollution on tropical bat communities is important for understanding community assembly rules in urban areas. Studies from temperate regions suggest that, among aerial insectivorous bats, fast-flying species that forage in the open are attracted to artificial lights, whereas slow-flying species that forage in cluttered environments avoid those lights. We measured aerial insectivore responses to light pollution in a tropical cloud forest to test this hypothesis. Bat echolocation was recorded at 20 pairs of light and dark sites in Monteverde, Costa Rica. Foraging activity was higher at artificially lighted sites than dark sites near the new moon, especially around blue-white fluorescent lighting. Most recorded bat species showed increased or unchanged activity in response to light, including some slow-flying and edge-foraging bats. This finding suggests that, contrary to the evaluated hypothesis, flight speed and foraging mode are not sufficient to determine bat responses to artificial lights in the tropics. Two bat species showed decreased activity at light sites, and a low species evenness was recorded around lights, particularly fluorescent lights, compared with dark sites. As in the temperate zone, light pollution in the tropics seems to concentrate certain bat species around human-inhabited areas, potentially shifting community structure.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2311  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hoyos-Díaz, J. M., Villalba-Alemán, E., Ramoni-Perazzi, P., & Muñoz-Romo, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of artificial lighting on capture success in two species of frugivorous bats (chiroptera: phyllostomidae) in an urban locality from the Venezuelan Andes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Mastozoologia Neotropical Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 25 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light is becoming a major issue for bats because it affects critical activities such as foraging, reproduction, and communication. We assessed the effect of artificial lighting on Artibeus lituratus and Artibeus jamaicensis in a small secondary growth forest patch near a street subjected to unexpected illumination. Bats were captured in the forest patch using a 12-m long mist net. Results indicated a nearly six-fold, significant decrease in capture success after the street lamps were installed. Artificial light from street lamps functions as a “light barrier” that inhibits bats from conducting short and long-distance movements, which might have detrimental consequences for bats and the plants they disperse. RESUMEN. Impacto de la luz artificial en el éxito de captura de dos especies de murciélagos frugívoros (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) en una localidad urbana de Los Andes venezolanos. La luz artificial se ha convertido en un problema grave para los murciélagos, porque está afectando actividades críticas que incluyen forrajeo, reproducción y comunicación. Evaluamos el efecto de la luz artificial en los murciélagos frugívoros Artibeus lituratus y Artibeus jamaicensis, en un pequeño parche de bosque secundario, cercano a una calle sujeta a una iluminación artificial inesperada. Capturamos a los murciélagos en el bosque secundario, empleando una red de neblina de 12 m de longitud. Los resultados indican que el éxito de captura disminuyó significativamente casi seis veces después de la instalación de los bombillos. La luz artificial de las lámparas funciona como “barreras u obstáculos de luz” que inhiben a los murciélagos de realizar movimientos de corta y larga distancia, lo cual podría tener consecuencias perjudiciales para los murciélagos y las plantas que ellos dispersan.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2318  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Laforge, A., Pauwels, J., Faure, B., Bas, Y., Kerbiriou, C., Fonderflick, J., & Besnard, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reducing light pollution improves connectivity for bats in urban landscapes Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-17  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Context

Light pollution can alter animal movements and landscape connectivity. This is particularly true in urban landscapes where a need to incorporate conservation issues in urban planning is urgent.

Objectives

We investigated how potential light-reduction scenarios at conurbation scale change landscape connectivity for bats.

Methods

Through random stratified sampling and species distribution modelling, we assessed the relative importance of light pollution on bat presence probability and activity. We recorded bats during one entire night on each 305 sampling points in 2015. In 2016, we surveyed 94 supplementary points to evaluate models performance. We used our spatial predictions to characterize landscape resistance to bat movements. Then we applied a least-cost modelling approach to identify nocturnal corridors and estimated the impact of five light-reduction scenarios on landscape connectivity for two light non-tolerant bat species.

Results

We found that light pollution detected from satellite images was a good predictor of bat presence and activity up to 700 m radius. Our results exhibited contrasting responses to average radiance: M. daubentonii responded negatively, P. nathusii had a positive response for low values then a negative response after a threshold radiance value of 20 W.m−2.sr−1 and E. serotinus responded positively. Five and four light-reduction scenarios significantly improved landscape connectivity for M. daubentonii and P. nathusii respectively.

Conclusions

Light-reduction measures should be included in urban planning to provide sustainable conditions for bats in cities. We advocate for the use of our methodological approach to further studies to find the best trade-off between conservation needs and social acceptability.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2345  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: