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Author Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution and solid-state lighting: reducing the carbon dioxide footprint is not enough Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Proc. SPIE 8785, 8th Iberoamerican Optics Meeting and 11th Latin American Meeting on Optics, Lasers, and Applications, 87852G, 2013 Abbreviated Journal Proc. SPIE 8785  
  Volume 8785 Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up) *Lighting; LED; light emitting diode; outdoor lighting; artificial light at night; lighting policy; solid-state lighting; blue light  
  Abstract Public and private lighting account for a relevant share of the overall electric power consumption worldwide. The pressing need of reducing the carbon dioxide emissions as well as of lowering the lumen•hour price tag has fostered the search for alternative lighting technologies to substitute for the incandescent and gas-discharge based lamps. The most successful approach to date, solid-state lighting, is already finding its way into the public lighting market, very often helped by substantial public investments and support. LED-based sources have distinct advantages: under controlled conditions their efficacy equals or surpasses that of conventional solutions, their small source size allows for an efficient collimation of the lightbeam (delivering the photons where they are actually needed and reducing lightspill on the surrounding areas), and they can be switched and/or dimmed on demand at very high rates, thus allowing for a tailored schedule of lighting. However, energy savings and carbon dioxide reduction are not the only crucial issues faced by present day lighting. A growing body of research has shown the significance of the spectral composition of light when it comes to assess the detrimental effects of artificial light-at-night (ALAN). The potential ALAN blueshift associated to the deployment of LED-based lighting systems has raised sensible concerns about its scientific, cultural, ecological and public health consequences, which can be further amplified if an increased light consumption is produced due to the rebound effect. This contribution addresses some of the challenges that these issues pose to the Optics and Photonics community.  
  Address Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, Spain; salva.bara@usc.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1135  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Acuto, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title We need a science of the night Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 576 Issue 7787 Pages 339  
  Keywords (up) *Policy; *Society; *Commentary  
  Abstract (none)  
  Address Connected Cities Lab, University of Melbourne; michele.acuto(at)unimelb.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Nature Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31853076 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2792  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Panagiotou, M.; Deboer, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Chronic Dim-light-at-night Exposure on Sleep in Young and Aged Mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience  
  Volume 426 Issue Pages 154-167  
  Keywords (up) Aging; Animals; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; *Light; Male; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Motor Activity/physiology; Photoperiod; Sleep/*physiology; Sleep Deprivation/physiopathology; Wakefulness/*physiology; *aging; *dim-light-at-night (DLAN); *electroencephalogram; *sleep; *sleep deprivation; *slow-wave-activity  
  Abstract Dim-light-at-night (DLAN) exposure is associated with health problems, such as metabolic disruptions, immunological modulations, oxidative stress, sleep problems, and altered circadian timing. Neurophysiological parameters, including sleep patterns, are altered in the course of aging in a similar way. Here, we investigated the effect of chronic (three months) DLAN exposure (12L:12Dim-light, 75:5lux) on sleep and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), and rest-activity behavior in young (6-month-old, n=9) and aged (18- n=8, 24-month-old, n=6) C57BL/6J mice and compared with age-matched controls (n=11, n=9 and n=8, respectively). We recorded the EEG and electromyogram continuously for 48-h and conducted a 6-h sleep-deprivation. A delay in the phase angle of entrainment of locomotor activity and daily vigilance state rhythms was apparent in mice following DLAN exposure, throughout the whole age spectrum, rendering sleep characteristics similar among the three age DLAN groups and significantly different from the age-matched controls. Notably, slow-wave-activity in NREM sleep (SWA, EEG power density in 0.5-4.0Hz) was differentially altered in young and aged DLAN mice. Particularly, SWA increased as a function of age, which was further accentuated following DLAN exposure. However, this was not found in the young DLAN animals, which were characterized by the lowest SWA levels. Concluding, long-term DLAN exposure induced more pronounced alterations in the sleep architecture of young mice, towards an aging phenotype, while it enhanced age-associated sleep changes in the older groups. Our data suggest that irrespective of age, chronic DLAN exposure deteriorates sleep behavior and may consequently impact general health.  
  Address Laboratory for Neurophysiology, Department of Cell and Chemical Biology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. t.de_boer ( at ) lumc.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4522 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31846754 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3387  
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Author Rayleigh, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Some Recent Work on the Light of the Night Sky1 Type Journal Article
  Year 1928 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 122 Issue 3070 Pages 315-317  
  Keywords (up) Airglow; Natural Sky Brightness  
  Abstract T is now well known that the light of the night sky has little in common with the day sky. When the sun is 18° below the horizon, and the moon also below the horizon, night conditions may be considered to be established. A clear sky is of course necessary for the study of the luminosity. Unlike the day sky, it is found to exhibit very little polarisation. The intensity is considerably below the threshold of colour vision, and subjective impressions about its colour, which is sometimes described by imaginative writers as blue, have no basis in reality.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3123  
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Author Su, Y.; Yue, J.; Liu, X.; Miller, S.D.; Ш, W.C.S.; Smith, S.M.; Guo, D.; Guo, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mesospheric Bore Observations Using Suomi-NPP VIIRS DNB during 2013–2017 Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 10 Issue 12 Pages 1935  
  Keywords (up) Airglow; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This paper reports mesospheric bore events observed by Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NOAA/NASA) Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) environmental satellite over five years (2013–2017). Two types of special mesospheric bore events were observed, enabled by the wide field of view of VIIRS: extremely wide bores (>2000 km extension perpendicular to the bore propagation direction), and those exhibiting more than 15 trailing crests and troughs. A mesospheric bore event observed simultaneously from space and ground was investigated in detail. DNB enables the preliminary global observation of mesospheric bores for the first time. DNB mesospheric bores occurred more frequently in March, April and May. Their typical lengths are between 300 km and 1200 km. The occurrence rate of bores at low latitudes is higher than that at middle latitudes. Among the 61 bore events, 39 events occurred in the tropical region (20°S–20°N). The high occurrence rate of mesospheric bores during the spring months in the tropical region coincides with the reported seasonal and latitudinal variations of mesospheric inversion layers.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2128  
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