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Author Franke, S.; Brüning, A.; Hölker, F.; Kloas, W.
Title Study of biological action of light on fish Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Light & Visual Environment Abbreviated Journal
Volume 37 Issue 4 Pages
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 698
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Author Lyytimäki, J.
Title Avoiding overly bright future: The systems intelligence perspective on the management of light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Environmental Development Abbreviated Journal Environmental Development
Volume 16 Issue Pages 4-14
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ISSN 2211-4645 ISBN Medium
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1200
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Author Lammerts, W.E.
Title The effect of continuous light, high nutrient level and temperature on flowering of camellia hybrids Type Journal Article
Year 1949 Publication American Camellia Yearbook Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 53-56
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2466
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Author Zheng, Q.; Weng, Q.; Wang, K.
Title Correcting the Pixel Blooming Effect (PiBE) of DMSP-OLS nighttime light imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 240 Issue Pages 111707
Keywords (up) *instrumentation; Remote Sensing
Abstract In the last two decades, the advance in nighttime light (NTL) remote sensing has fueled a surge in extensive research towards mapping human footprints. Nevertheless, the full potential of NTL data is largely constrained by the blooming effect. In this study, we propose a new concept, the Pixel Blooming Effect (PiBE), to delineate the mutual influence of lights from a pixel and its neighbors, and an integrated framework to eliminate the PiBE in radiance calibrated DMSP-OLS datasets (DMSPgrc). First, lights from isolated gas flaring sources and a Gaussian model were used to model how the PiBE functions on each pixel through point spread function (PSF). Second, a two-stage deblurring approach (TSDA) was developed to deconvolve DMSPgrc images with Tikhonov regularization to correct the PiBE and reconstruct PiBE-free images. Third, the proposed framework was assessed by synthetic data and VIIRS imagery and by testing the resulting image with two applications. We found that high impervious surface fraction pixels (ISF > 0.6) were impacted by the highest absolute magnitude of PiBE, whereas NTL pattern of low ISF pixels (ISF < 0.2) was more sensitive to the PiBE. By using TSDA the PiBE in DMSPgrc images was effectively corrected which enhanced data variation and suppressed pseudo lights from non-built-up pixels in urban areas. The reconstructed image had the highest similarity to reference data from synthetic image (SSIM = 0.759) and VIIRS image (r = 0.79). TSDA showed an acceptable performance for linear objects (width > 1.5 km) and circular objects (radius > 0.5 km), and for NTL data with different noise levels (<0.6σ). In summary, the proposed framework offers a new opportunity to improve the quality of DMSP-OLS images and subsequently will be conducive to NTL-based applications, such as mapping urban extent, estimating socioeconomic variables, and exploring eco-impact of artificial lights.
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ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2940
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Author Bará, S.
Title Light pollution and solid-state lighting: reducing the carbon dioxide footprint is not enough Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Proc. SPIE 8785, 8th Iberoamerican Optics Meeting and 11th Latin American Meeting on Optics, Lasers, and Applications, 87852G, 2013 Abbreviated Journal Proc. SPIE 8785
Volume 8785 Issue Pages
Keywords (up) *Lighting; LED; light emitting diode; outdoor lighting; artificial light at night; lighting policy; solid-state lighting; blue light
Abstract Public and private lighting account for a relevant share of the overall electric power consumption worldwide. The pressing need of reducing the carbon dioxide emissions as well as of lowering the lumen•hour price tag has fostered the search for alternative lighting technologies to substitute for the incandescent and gas-discharge based lamps. The most successful approach to date, solid-state lighting, is already finding its way into the public lighting market, very often helped by substantial public investments and support. LED-based sources have distinct advantages: under controlled conditions their efficacy equals or surpasses that of conventional solutions, their small source size allows for an efficient collimation of the lightbeam (delivering the photons where they are actually needed and reducing lightspill on the surrounding areas), and they can be switched and/or dimmed on demand at very high rates, thus allowing for a tailored schedule of lighting. However, energy savings and carbon dioxide reduction are not the only crucial issues faced by present day lighting. A growing body of research has shown the significance of the spectral composition of light when it comes to assess the detrimental effects of artificial light-at-night (ALAN). The potential ALAN blueshift associated to the deployment of LED-based lighting systems has raised sensible concerns about its scientific, cultural, ecological and public health consequences, which can be further amplified if an increased light consumption is produced due to the rebound effect. This contribution addresses some of the challenges that these issues pose to the Optics and Photonics community.
Address Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, Spain; salva.bara@usc.es
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Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1135
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