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Author Gatford, K.L.; Kennaway, D.J.; Liu, H.; Kleemann, D.O.; Kuchel, T.R.; Varcoe, T.J.
Title Simulated shift work disrupts maternal circadian rhythms and metabolism, and increases gestation length in sheep Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol
Volume 597 Issue 7 Pages 1889-1904
Keywords (up) Animals; *Circadian Rhythm; Female; Fetal Development; Pregnancy; *Pregnancy, Animal/physiology; Pregnancy, Multiple; Sheep/*physiology; *Shift Work Schedule; Sleep/*physiology; *circadian rhythms; *fetus; *maternal; *pregnancy; *sheep; *shift work
Abstract KEY POINTS: Shift work impairs metabolic health, although its effects during pregnancy are not well understood We evaluated the effects of a simulated shift work protocol for one-third, two-thirds or all of pregnancy on maternal and pregnancy outcomes in sheep. Simulated shift work changed the timing of activity, disrupted hormonal and cellular rhythms, and impaired maternal glucose tolerance during early pregnancy. Gestation length was increased in twin pregnancies, whereas singleton lambs were lighter at a given gestational age if mothers were subjected to shift work conditions in the first one-third of pregnancy. Exposure to rotating night and day shifts, even if only in early pregnancy, may adversely affect maternal metabolic and pregnancy outcomes. ABSTRACT: Shift workers are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and obesity; however, the impact during pregnancy on maternal metabolism is unknown. Using a large animal model, we assessed the impact of simulated shift work (SSW) exposure during pregnancy on maternal circadian rhythms, glucose tolerance and pregnancy outcomes. Following mating, ewes were randomly allocated to a control photoperiod (CON 12 h light, 12 h dark) or to SSW, where the timing of light exposure and food presentation was reversed twice each week for one-third, two-thirds or all of pregnancy. Maternal behaviour followed SSW cycles with increased activity during light exposure and feeding. Melatonin rhythms resynchronized within 2 days of the photoperiod shift, whereas peripheral circadian rhythms were arrhythmic. SSW impaired glucose tolerance (+29%, P = 0.019) and increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (+32%, P = 0.018) in ewes with a singleton fetus in early but not late gestation. SSW exposure did not alter rates of miscarriage or stillbirth, although it extended gestation length in twin pregnancies (+2.4 days, P = 0.032). Relative to gestational age, birth weight was lower in singleton progeny of SSW than CON ewes (-476 g, P = 0.016). These results have implications for the large number of women currently engaged in shift work, and further studies are required to determine progeny health impacts.
Address Robinson Research Institute, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30671970; PMCID:PMC6441904 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3136
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Author Richardson, M.E.S.; Parkins, S.; Kaneza, I.; Dauphin, A.-C.
Title Jet Lag Recovery and Memory Functions Are Correlated with Direct Light Effects on Locomotion Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume in press Issue Pages 748730420947589
Keywords (up) Animals; activity; behavior; entrainment; jet lag; light therapy; masking; memory
Abstract Jet lag is a circadian disruption that affects millions of people, resulting, among other things, in extreme sleepiness and memory loss. The hazardous implications of such effects are evident in situations in which focus and attention are required. Remarkably, there is a limited understanding of how jet lag recovery and associated memory loss vary year round under different photoperiods. Here we show, using different cycles representing winter, summer, and equinox in male mice, that jet lag recovery and memory vary significantly with photoperiod changes. We uncover a positive correlation of acute light effects on circadian-driven locomotion (known as negative masking) with photoentrainment speed and memory enhancement during jet lag. Specifically, we show that enhancing or reducing negative masking is correlated with better or worse memory performance, respectively. This study indicates that in addition to timed-light exposure for phase shifting, the negative masking response could also be biologically relevant when designing effective treatments of jet lag.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, Oakwood University, Huntsville, Alabama
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32877295 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3130
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Author Westby, K.M.; Medley, K.A.
Title Cold Nights, City Lights: Artificial Light at Night Reduces Photoperiodically Induced Diapause in Urban and Rural Populations of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Medical Entomology Abbreviated Journal J Med Entomol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Animals; Aedes albopictus; artificial light at night; common garden; diapause; urban ecology
Abstract As the planet becomes increasingly urbanized, it is imperative that we understand the ecological and evolutionary consequences of urbanization on species. One common attribute of urbanization that differs from rural areas is the prevalence of artificial light at night (ALAN). For many species, light is one of the most important and reliable environmental cues, largely governing the timing of daily and seasonal activity patterns. Recently, it has been shown that ALAN can alter behavioral, phenological, and physiological traits in diverse taxa. For temperate insects, diapause is an essential trait for winter survival and commences in response to declining daylight hours in the fall. Diapause is under strong selection pressure in the mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse); local adaptation and rapid evolution has been observed along a latitudinal cline. It is unknown how ALAN affects this photosensitive trait or if local adaptation has occurred along an urbanization gradient. Using a common garden experiment, we experimentally demonstrated that simulated ALAN reduces diapause incidence in this species by as much as 40%. There was no difference, however, between urban and rural demes. We also calculated diapause incidence from wild demes in urban areas to determine whether wild populations exhibited lower than predicted incidence compared to estimates from total nocturnal darkness. In early fall, lower than predicted diapause incidence was recorded, but all demes reached nearly 100% diapause before terminating egg laying. It is possible that nocturnal resting behavior in vegetation limits the amount of ALAN exposure this species experiences potentially limiting local adaptation.
Address Tyson Research Center, Washington University in Saint Louis, Eureka, MO
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-2585 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32638000 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3042
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Author Verma, A.K.; Singh, S.; Rizvi, S.I.
Title Age-dependent altered redox homeostasis in the chronodisrupted rat model and moderation by melatonin administration Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Animals; Aging; artificial light-at-night; circadian disruption; melatonin; oxidative stress
Abstract Circadian disruption or chronodisruption (CD) occurs when day-night cycles and other internal rhythms are not adjusted to environmental light-dark regimens and are unable to synchronize among each other. Artificial light-induced oxidative stress is a major concern as the circadian physiology of the cell is chronically altered due to suppression of the time-keeping hormone, melatonin. The relationship between age-related impaired redox status and disrupted circadian rhythms is still not fully understood. The present study evaluated the effect of artificial light at night (ALAN) with respect to aging and role of melatonin supplementation. This study was conducted on young (3 months) and old (24 months) male Wistar rats subdivided into four groups control (C), melatonin treated (MLT), artificial light at night (ALAN), and ALAN+MLT group. Pronounced changes were observed in the old compared to the young rats. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), plasma membrane redox system (PMRS), protein carbonyl (PCO), and sialic acid (SA) were significantly (p </= 0.05) increased, while ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were significantly (p </= 0.05) suppressed in light-exposed young and old animals compared to their age-matched controls. Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) increased non-significantly in young rats of the ALAN group; however, significant (p </= 0.05) changes were observed in the old rats of the ALAN group compared to their respective controls. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) increased and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity decreased, significantly (p </= 0.05) in young animals of the ALAN group, while nonsignificant changes of both parameters were recorded in the old animals of the ALAN groups compared with their age-matched controls. Melatonin supplementation resulted in maintenance of the normal redox homeostasis in both young and old animal groups. Our study suggests that aged rats are more susceptible to altered photoperiod as their circadian redox homeostasis is under stress subsequent to ALAN. Melatonin supplementation could be a promising means of alleviating age-related circadian disturbances, especially in light-polluted areas.
Address Department of Biochemistry, University of Allahabad , Allahabad, India
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32731777 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3067
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Author Straka,T. M., Wolf, M., Gras, P., Buchholz, S., & Voigt, C. C.
Title Tree Cover Mediates the Effect of Artificial Light on Urban Bats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue Pages 91
Keywords (up) Animals; ALAN; bats; canopy cover; chiroptera; light-emitting diodes; LED; trees; Ultraviolet; urban
Abstract With urban areas growing worldwide, so does artificial light at night (ALAN) which negatively affects many nocturnal animals, including bats. The response of bats to ALAN ranges from some opportunistic species taking advantage of insect aggregations around street lamps, particularly those emitting ultraviolet (UV) light, to others avoiding lit areas at all. Tree cover has been suggested to mitigate the negative effects of ALAN on bats by shielding areas against light scatter. Here, we investigated the effect of tree cover on the relationship between ALAN and bats in Berlin, Germany. In particular, we asked if this interaction varies with the UV light spectrum of street lamps and also across urban bat species. We expected trees next to street lamps to block ALAN, making the adjacent habitat more suitable for all species, irrespective of the wavelength spectrum of the light source. Additionally, we expected UV emitting lights next to trees to attract insects and thus, opportunistic bats. In summer 2017, we recorded bat activity at 22 green open spaces in Berlin using automated ultrasonic detectors. We analyzed bat activity patterns and landscape variables (number of street lamps with and without UV light emission, an estimate of light pollution, and tree cover density around each recording site within different spatial scales) using generalized linear mixed-effects models with a negative binomial distribution. We found a species-specific response of bats to street lamps with and without UV light, providing a more detailed picture of ALAN impacts than simply total light radiance. Moreover, we found that dense tree cover dampened the negative effect of street lamps without UV for open-space foraging bats of the genera Nyctalus, Eptesicus, and Vespertilio, yet it amplified the already existing negative or positive effect of street lamps with or without UV on Pipistrellus pipistrellus, P. pygmaeus, and Myotis spp. Our study underpins the importance of minimizing artificial light at night close to vegetation, particularly for bats adapted to spatial complexity in the environment (i.e., clutter-adapted species), and to increase dense vegetation in urban landscape to provide, besides roosting opportunities, protection against ALAN for open-space foraging bats in city landscapes.
Address Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2302
Permanent link to this record