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Author Straka, T.M.; Greif, S.; Schultz, S.; Goerlitz, H.R.; Voigt, C.C.
Title The effect of cave illumination on bats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Global Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal Global Ecology and Conservation
Volume 21 Issue Pages e00808
Keywords (up) Animals; Lighting
Abstract Artificial light at night has large impacts on nocturnal wildlife such as bats, yet its effect varies with wavelength of light, context, and across species involved. Here, we studied in two experiments how wild bats of cave-roosting species (Rhinolophus mehelyi, R. euryale, Myotis capaccinii and Miniopterus schreibersii) respond to LED lights of different colours. In dual choice experiments, we measured the acoustic activity of bats in response to neutral-white, red or amber LED at a cave entrance and in a flight room – mimicking a cave interior. In the flight room, M. capaccinii and M. schreibersii preferred red to white light, but showed no preference for red over amber, or amber over white light. In the cave entrance experiment, all light colours reduced the activity of all emerging species, yet red LED had the least negative effect. Rhinolophus species reacted most strongly, matching their refusal to fly at all under any light treatment in the flight room. We conclude that the placement and light colour of LED light should be considered carefully in lighting concepts for caves both in the interior and at the entrance. In a cave interior, red LED light could be chosen – if needed at all – for careful temporary illumination of areas, yet areas important for bats should be avoided based on the precautionary principle. At cave entrances, the high sensitivity of most bat species, particularly of Rhinolophus spp., towards light sources almost irrespective of colour, calls for utmost caution when illuminating cave entrances.
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Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN 2351-9894 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2700
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Author Ford, S.; Kidd, P.; Nashand, K.; Rietveld, A.
Title ARTIFICIAL LIGHT AND MOTH BIODIVERSITY: A COMPARISON OF MOTH DIVERSITY ACROSS DIFFERENT HABITATS ON LUNDY TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECT OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHT Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Lundy Field Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue Pages 53-68
Keywords (up) Animals; Lundy; Moths
Abstract Moths perform important roles within ecosystems. Behavioural responses to artificial light disrupt adaptive behaviours, causing population declines. Island populations can assess moth population attracted to artificial light, distinct from urbanisation. Here we present results from day counts of moth larvae and nocturnal Skinner light-traps from Lundy. Findings reveal a significant difference between moth population dynamics and species at differing locations.Overall, numbers of individuals and species caught with the UV-light trap were significantly greater than LED sources.These findings can be applied to potential artificial light changes on Lundy, as well as further changes throughout the United Kingdom
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3132
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Author Haddock, J., K., Threlfall, C. G., Law, B., & Hochuli, D. F.
Title Responses of insectivorous bats and nocturnal insects to local changes in street light technology Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Austral Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 44 Issue 6 Pages 1052-1064
Keywords (up) Animals; Mammals; Bats; Chalinolobus gouldii; Miniopterus schreibersii oceanensis; Australia; LED; lighting; street lighting
Abstract Artificial light at night is a pervasive anthropogenic stressor for biodiversity. Many fast‐flying insectivorous bat species feed on insects that are attracted to light‐emitting ultraviolet radiation (10–400 nm). Several countries are currently focused on replacing mercury vapour lamps, which emit ultraviolet light, with more cost‐efficient light‐emitting diode (LED) lights, which emit less ultraviolet radiation. This reduction in ultraviolet light may cause declines in insect densities in cities, predatory fast‐flying bats, and some edge‐foraging and slow‐flying bats. Capitalising on a scheme to update streetlights from high ultraviolet mercury vapour to low ultraviolet LED in Sydney, Australia, we measured the activity of individual bat species, the activity of different functional groups and the bat and insect communities, before and after the change in technology. We also surveyed sites with already LED lights, sites with mercury vapour lights and unlit bushland remnants. Species adapted to foraging in cluttered vegetation, and some edge‐space foraging species, were more active in unlit bushland sites than in all lit sites and decreased in activity at lit sites after the change to LED lights. The change to LED streetlights caused a decrease in the fast‐flying Chalinolobus gouldii but not Miniopterus schreibersii oceanensis, the latter being more influenced by seasonal and environmental variables. Insect biomass was not affected by changing light types, but instead was negatively correlated with the moon's percentage illuminance. Changing streetlights to LEDs could result in a decline in some insectivorous bats in cities. This study confirms that unlit urban bushland remnants are important refuges for high bat diversity, particularly for more clutter‐adapted species and some edge‐space foraging species. Preventing light penetration into unlit bushland patches and corridors remains essential to protect the urban bat community.
Address School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Sydney, Heydon‐Laurence Building, Science Road, Sydney, New South Wales, 2006 Australia; joanna.haddock(at)sydney.edu.au
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2636
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Author Mejias, A. L., Calrisle, M. C., & Bender, M. J.
Title Investigating the influence of small-scale light pollution on bat activity Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Georgia Journal of Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 77 Issue 1 Pages 89
Keywords (up) Animals; Mammals; Bats; Georgia; United States
Abstract Large-scale light pollution is widely documented to have deleterious effects on many nocturnal species, including bats. However, the full extent of these effects, and how they scale with light size and intensity, are not well documented. Previous studies investigating the influence of lights on bat activity have typically concentrated on large-scale light pollution, but smaller scale pollution is pervasive and actions taken by individuals may mitigate any negative effects. Our specific objective for this study is to determine what, if any, effects residential-type security lights have on bat activity in habitats with otherwise limited anthropogenic sources of light. To achieve this objective, we used acoustic detectors to measure bat activity both with and without the presence of an artificial light source. Using this general approach, we conducted a pilot study to refine field methodology between October and November of 2018 in Hall and Jackson counties. Preliminary data were inconclusive, most likely because of overall low bat activity associated with this time of the year, but our methods showed promise as an approach to evaluate the influence light on bat activity. The study will resume in the upcoming spring and summer of 2019, and during this period of increased bat activity, we will attempt to quantify the effects of small-scale light pollution on native bat populations in northern Georgia.
Address University of North Georgia, Oakwood, GA 30566 USA
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2356
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Author Murphy, B.A.
Title Circadian and circannual regulation in the horse: Internal timing in an elite athlete Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal Journal of Equine Veterinary Science
Volume 76 Issue Pages 14-24
Keywords (up) Animals; Mammals; horses
Abstract Biological rhythms evolved to provide temporal coordination across all tissues and organs and allow synchronisation of physiology with predictable environmental cycles. Most important of these are circadian and circannual rhythms, primarily regulated via photoperiod signals from the retina. Understanding the nature of physiological rhythms in horses is crucially important for equine management. Predominantly, we have removed them from exposure to their natural environmental stimuli; the seasonally changing photoperiod, continuous foraging and feeding activity, social herd interactions and the continuous low intensity exercise of a grassland dweller. These have been replaced in many cases with confined indoor housing, regimental feeding and exercise times, social isolation and exposure to lighting that is often erratic and does not come close to mimicking the spectral composition of sunlight. We have further altered seasonal timing cues through the use of artificial lighting programs that impact reproductive behaviour, breeding efficiency and the development of youngstock. Understanding how these new environmental cues (some stronger, some weaker) impact the internal physiology of the horse in the context of the natural endogenous rhythms that evolved over millennia, is key to helping to improve equine health, welfare and performance, now and into the future. This review provides an overview of the field, highlights the recent discoveries related to biological timing in horses and discusses the implications that these findings may have for the production and management of the elite equine athlete.
Address Barbara A. Murphy, School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland; Barbara.murphy(at)ucd.ie
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elseverier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0737-0806 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2257
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