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Author Cronin, A.D.; Ryan, M.J.; Page, R.A.; Hunter, K.L.; Taylor, R.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Environmental heterogeneity alters mate choice behavior for multimodal signals Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 73 Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract nimals frequently experience changes in their environment, including diel and seasonal shifts in abiotic and biotic factors. In addition to physiological and morphological changes, animals alter their behavior in response to environmental variation. This study examined the impacts of heterogeneous environments on mating behaviors. We examined both male and female túngara frog phonotactic responses to multimodal (audiovisual) and unimodal (acoustic) stimuli. We altered aspects of the physical environment by changing substrate (terrestrial and aquatic) and ambient light levels. Females demonstrated a similar preference for the audiovisual stimulus regardless of substrate but decreased latency to choose in an aquatic environment. When ambient light levels were increased (relative to darker control), females reversed their preference, avoiding the multimodal stimulus, but the latency to choose was unchanged. Males demonstrated no preference for the multimodal signal on either substrate, but like females, male latency was reduced in an aquatic environment. Different environments carry their own associated costs, including varying levels of predation risk. Increased light levels and an aquatic environment likely carry higher predation risk and therefore should lead to changes in female and male responses. Interestingly, these two environments do not cause uniform changes in female responses. The addition of an aquatic environment led to a reduction in latency, whereas an increase in ambient light levels induced a change in female mate preference. These findings demonstrate the importance of the environment on mating responses to multimodal signals.  
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  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2262  
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Author Musila, S.; Bogdanowicz, W.; Syingi, R.; Zuhura, A.; Chylarecki, P.; Rydell, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title No lunar phobia in insectivorous bats in Kenya Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Mammalian Biology Abbreviated Journal Mammalian Biology  
  Volume 95 Issue Pages 77-84  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract We monitored foraging insectivorous bats along walked transects in forest and farmland at Arabuko-Sokoke Forest in coastal Kenya, using a heterodyne bat detector. The main purpose was to test whether aerial-hawking insectivorous bats that feed in open places (in this case mostly Scotophilus and Scotoecus spp.) show lunar phobia, i.e. restricting their activity on moonlit nights. Such behavior would be an expected response to the threat posed by visually oriented aerial predators such as bat hawks, owls and carnivorous bats. The occurrence of lunar phobia in bats is a controversial issue and may have implications for how bats will be affected by increasing light pollution. Our results show that foraging activity of the bats that we studied was related to time of day, season, and habitat, albeit with no additional effect of moonlight discernable. We therefore conclude that foraging activity occurs independently of moonlight. This result is partly at odds with previous findings including predictions from a meta-analysis of lunar phobia in bats, which indicates that lunar phobia is common in these animals, though most likely to be present in tropical species that feed in open situations near vegetation and over water. Equally, our results conform to findings from studies of aerial insectivorous bats in tropical as well as temperate areas, most of which have failed to reveal any clear evidence of lunar phobia. We believe that moonlight generally does not facilitate aerial predation on flying bats in open situations, or, alternatively, the bats accept increased predation pressure while they fulfil the energetic requirements through hunting.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1616-5047 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2269  
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Author Wickham, D.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Attracting and Controlling Coastal Pelagic Fish with Nightlights Type Journal Article
  Year 1973 Publication Transactions of the American Fisheries Society Abbreviated Journal Transactions of the American Fisheries Society  
  Volume 102 Issue 4 Pages 816-825  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Field experiments were conducted in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico to evaluate techniques for using sequentially‐operated lamp strings and moving lamps to lead and concentrate light‐attracted coastal pelagic fishes. Fish were successfully led between sequentially‐operated under‐water lamps separated by distances up to 20 meters. Mobile lamps were used to lead fish distances up to approximately 1 kilometer. Fish aggregations which form daily around man‐made structures were held after dark and led clear with moving lamps for capture by purse seine. A combination of nightlighting and man‐made structure fish attraction techniques are proposed for harvesting coastal pelagic fish aggregations which occur around existing petroleton drilling platforms, well heads, and other areas presently inaccessible to conventional fishing gear.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-8487 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2452  
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Author Zhang, X.; Yang, W.; Liang, W.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Intensity dependent disruptive effects of light at night on activation of the HPG axis of tree sparrows (Passer montanus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) has become increasingly recognized as a disruptor of the reproductive endocrine process and behavior of wild birds. However, there is no evidence that ALAN directly disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and no information on the effects of different ALAN intensities on birds. We experimentally tested whether ALAN affects reproductive endocrine activation in the HPG axis of birds, and whether this effect is related to the intensity of ALAN, in wild tree sparrows (Passer montanus). Forty-eight adult female birds were randomly assigned to four groups. They were first exposed to a short light photoperiod (8 h light and 16 h dark per day) for 20 days, then exposed to a long light photoperiod (16 h light and 8 h dark per day) to initiate the reproductive endocrine process. During these two kinds of photoperiod treatments, the four groups of birds were exposed to 0, 85, 150, and 300 lux light in the dark phase (night) respectively. The expression of the reproductive endocrine activation related TSH-β, Dio2 and GnRH-I gene was significantly higher in birds exposed to 85 lux light at night, and significantly lower in birds exposed to 150 and 300 lux, relative to the 0 lux control. The birds exposed to 85 lux had higher peak values of plasma LH and estradiol concentration and reached the peak earlier than birds exposed to 0, 150, or 300 lux did. The lower gene expression of birds exposed to 150 and 300 lux reduced their peak LH and estradiol values, but did not delay the timing of these peaks compared to the control group. These results reveal that low intensity ALAN accelerates the activation of the reproductive endocrine process in the HPG axis, whereas high intensity ALAN retards it.  
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  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2281  
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Author Mohamad, Y.; Haim, A.; Elsalam, Z.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Altered metabolic and hormonal responses in male rats exposed to acute bright light-at-night associated with global DNA hypo-methylation Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract The association between light pollution and disruption of daily rhythms, metabolic and hormonal disorders, as well as cancer progression is well-recognized. These adverse effects could be due to nocturnal melatonin suppression. The signaling pathway by which light pollution affects metabolism and endocrine responses is unclear. We studied the effects of artificial light at night (ALAN1) on body mass, food and water intake, daily rhythms of body temperature, serum glucose and insulin in male rats. Daily rhythms of urine production and urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6-SMT2), as well as global DNA methylation in pancreas and liver tissues were also assessed. Mass gain was higher in ALAN rats compared with controls. Food intake, water consumption, glucose, insulin, and 6-SMT levels markedly lessened in response to ALAN. Conversely, urine production and body temperature were elevated in ALAN rats compared with controls. Significant 24-h rhythms were detected for all variables that were altered in mesor, amplitude, and acrophase occurrences under ALAN conditions. DNA hypo-methylation was detected in ALAN pancreatic tissue compared with controls, but not in hepatic tissue. Overall, ALAN affects metabolic and hormonal physiology in different levels in which flexible crosstalk between melatonin and both epigenetics and metabolic levels expressed as body temperature rhythm, is suggested to mediate the environmental exposure at the molecular level and subsequently physiology is altered. The flexibility of epigenetic modifications provides a potential therapeutic target for rectifying ALAN adverse effects by epigenetic markers such as melatonin and behavioral lifestyle interventions for confining ALAN exposures as much as possible.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1011-1344 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2282  
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