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Author Renthlei, Z.; Trivedi, A.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of urban environment on pineal machinery and clock genes expression of tree sparrow (Passer montanus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume 255 Issue Pages 113278  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Increasing urbanisation is altering the physiology of wild animals and the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. We hypothesised that altering the physiology of urban organisms is due to the effect of extra light at night on the circadian clock by modulating the expression of pineal machinery and clock genes. Two experiments were performed. In Experiment 1, immediately after being procured from their respective sites (urban and rural sites), birds were released individually in LLdim light conditions. Circadian rhythm period, activity duration, and total activity count were calculated and did not differ between urban and rural birds. In Experiment 2, birds (from urban and rural habitats) were sampled at six time points at regular 4-h intervals, beginning 1 h after sunrise. We measured daily variations in plasma melatonin levels. We also analysed the expression levels of Aanat, Mel1A and Mel1B as an indicator of melatonin biosynthesis and action machinery. Clock and clock-controlled genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per2, Per3, Cry1 and Npas2) were studied in the hypothalamus, the pineal gland, and retina to investigate the effects of urban habitats on the circadian clock. Our results show that there is a lower expression of Aanat in the pineal gland and relatively low plasma melatonin levels in urban birds. Further, clock genes are also differentially expressed in all three central tissues of urban birds. We propose that alterations in the melatonin biosynthesis machinery and the expression of clock genes could result in miscalculations in the internal timing of the organism, with environmental timings leading to altered physiology in urban wild animals.  
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  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2682  
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Author Frost, S.W. openurl 
  Title Insects taken in light traps at the Archbold Biological Station, Highlands County, Florida Type Journal Article
  Year 1964 Publication Florida Entomologist Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 47 Issue 2 Pages 129-161  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2732  
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Author Cammaerts, M. C., & Cammaerts, R. url  openurl
  Title Effect of nocturnal lighting on an ant’s ethological and physiological traits Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication MOJ Ecology & Environmental Sciences Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 4 Issue 5 Pages 211-218  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Artificial nocturnal lighting affects the nature, an impact best studied on vertebrates that are directly depending on the presence or absence of light. Here, we examined on an ant species taken as a model the effects of artificial nocturnal lighting on eleven physiological and ethological traits. Ant workers maintained under nocturnal lighting showed a decrease or a change in their level of activity, food consumption, locomotion, orientation ability, audacity, tactile perception, social relationship, learning and memory. This was largely observed during the night but the effects persisted, at a lower extend, during the day  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2735  
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Smit, J.A.H.; Visser, M.E.; Halfwerk, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Multisensory pollution: Artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise have interactive effects on activity patterns of great tits (Parus major) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume 256 Issue Pages 113314  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Urbanisation is increasing globally at a rapid pace. Consequently, wild species face novel environmental stressors associated with urban sprawl, such as artificial light at night and noise. These stressors have pervasive effects on the behaviour and physiology of many species. Most studies have singled out the impact of just one of these stressors, while in the real world they are likely to co-occur both temporally and spatially, and we thus lack a clear understanding of the combined effect of anthropogenic stressors on wild species. Here, we experimentally exposed captive male great tits (Parus major) to artificial light at night and 24 h noise in a fully factorial experiment. We then measured the effect of both these stressors on their own and their combination on the amount and timing of activity patterns. We found that both light and noise affected activity patterns when presented alone, but in opposite ways: light increased activity, particularly at night, while noise reduced it, particularly during the day. When the two stressors were combined, we found a synergistic effect on the total activity and the nighttime activity, but an antagonistic effect on daytime activity. The significant interaction between noise and light treatment also differed among forest and city birds. Indeed, we detected a significant interactive effect on light and noise on daytime, nighttime, dusktime and offset of activity of urban birds, but not of forest birds. These results suggest that both artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise can drive changes in activity patterns, but that the specific impacts depend on the habitat of origin. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that co-occurring exposure to noise and light can lead to a stronger impact at night than predicted from the additive effects and thus that multisensory pollution may be a considerable threat for wildlife.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, the Netherlands; avide.dominoni(at)glasgow.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2744  
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Author Liu, Z.; Qian, M.; Tang, X.; Hu, W.; Sun, S.; Li, G.; Zhang, S.; Meng, F.; Cao, X.; Sun, J.; Xu, C.; Tan, B.; Pang, Q.; Zhao, B.; Wang, Z.; Guan, Y.; Ruan, X.; Liu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title SIRT7 couples light-driven body temperature cues to hepatic circadian phase coherence and gluconeogenesis Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Nature Metabolism Abbreviated Journal Nat Metab  
  Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 1141-1156  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract The central pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizes peripheral oscillators to coordinate physiological and behavioural activities throughout the body. How circadian phase coherence between the SCN and the periphery is controlled is not well understood. Here, we identify hepatic SIRT7 as an early responsive element to light that ensures circadian phase coherence in the mouse liver. The SCN-driven body temperature (BT) oscillation induces rhythmic expression of HSP70, which promotes SIRT7 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Acute temperature challenge dampens the BT oscillation and causes an advanced liver circadian phase. Further, hepatic SIRT7 deacetylates CRY1, promotes its FBXL3-mediated degradation and regulates the hepatic clock and glucose homeostasis. Loss of Sirt7 in mice leads to an advanced liver circadian phase and rapid entrainment of the hepatic clock upon daytime-restricted feeding. These data identify a BT–HSP70–SIRT7–CRY1 axis that couples the mouse hepatic clock to the central pacemaker and ensures circadian phase coherence and glucose homeostasis.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2522-5812 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2747  
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