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Author Czarnecka, M.; Kakareko, T.; Jermacz, Ł.; Pawlak, R.; Kobak, J.
Title Combined effects of nocturnal exposure to artificial light and habitat complexity on fish foraging Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment
Volume 684 Issue Pages 14-22
Keywords Animal; fishes; Perca fluviatilis; Gammarus fossarum; gammarids; aquatic ecosystems
Abstract Due to the widespread use of artificial light, freshwater ecosystems in urban areas at night are often subjected to light of intensities exceeding that of the moonlight. Nocturnal dim light could modify fish behaviour and benefit visual predators because of enhanced foraging success compared to dark nights. However, effects of nocturnal light could be mitigated by the presence of structured habitats providing refuges for prey. We tested in laboratory experiments whether nocturnal light of low intensity (2 lx) increases foraging efficiency of the Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) on invertebrate prey (Gammarus fossarum). The tests were conducted at dusk and night under two light regimes: natural cycle with dark nights and disturbed cycle with artificially illuminated nights, in habitats differing in structural complexity: sand and woody debris. We found that nocturnal illumination significantly enhanced the consumption of gammarids by fish compared to dark nights. In addition, the perch was as effective predator in illuminated nights (2 lx) as at dusk (10 lx). Woody debris provided an effective refuge only in combination with undisturbed darkness, but not in illuminated nights. Our results suggest that nocturnal illumination in aquatic ecosystems may contribute to significant reductions in invertebrate population sizes through fish predation. The loss of darkness reduces the possibility of using shelters by invertebrates and hence the effects of elevated light levels at night could not be mitigated by an increased habitat complexity.
Address Department of Ecology and Biogeography, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń, Poland; mczarn(at)umk.pl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor English Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2507
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Author Walker, W.H. 2nd; Borniger, J.C.; Gaudier-Diaz, M.M.; Hecmarie Melendez-Fernandez, O.; Pascoe, J.L.; Courtney DeVries, A.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Acute exposure to low-level light at night is sufficient to induce neurological changes and depressive-like behavior Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Molecular Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Mol Psychiatry
Volume Issue Pages s41380-019-0430-4
Keywords Human health; physiology; brain
Abstract The advent and wide-spread adoption of electric lighting over the past century has profoundly affected the circadian organization of physiology and behavior for many individuals in industrialized nations; electric lighting in homes, work environments, and public areas have extended daytime activities into the evening, thus, increasing night-time exposure to light. Although initially assumed to be innocuous, chronic exposure to light at night (LAN) is now associated with increased incidence of cancer, metabolic disorders, and affective problems in humans. However, little is known about potential acute effects of LAN. To determine whether acute exposure to low-level LAN alters brain function, adult male, and female mice were housed in either light days and dark nights (LD; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 0 lux) or light days and low level light at night (LAN; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 5 lux). Mice exposed to LAN on three consecutive nights increased depressive-like responses compared to mice housed in dark nights. In addition, female mice exposed to LAN increased central tendency in the open field. LAN was associated with reduced hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in both male and female mice, as well as increased VEGFR1 and interleukin-1beta mRNA expression in females, and reduced brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in males. Further, LAN significantly altered circadian rhythms (activity and temperature) and circadian gene expression in female and male mice, respectively. Altogether, this study demonstrates that acute exposure to LAN alters brain physiology and can be detrimental to well-being in otherwise healthy individuals.
Address Department of Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1359-4184 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31138889 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2509
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Author Bullock, B.; McGlashan, E.M.; Burns, A.C.; Lu, B.S.; Cain, S.W.
Title Traits related to bipolar disorder are associated with an increased post-illumination pupil response Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Psychiatry Research Abbreviated Journal Psychiatry Res
Volume 278 Issue Pages 35-41
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Mood states in bipolar disorder appear to be closely linked to changes in sleep and circadian function. It has been suggested that hypersensitivity of the circadian system to light may be a trait vulnerability for bipolar disorder. Healthy persons with emotional-behavioural traits associated with bipolar disorder also appear to exhibit problems with circadian rhythms, which may be associated with individual differences in light sensitivity. This study investigated the melanopsin-driven post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) in relation to emotional-behavioural traits associated with bipolar disorder (measured with the General Behavior Inventory) in a non-clinical group (n=61). An increased PIPR was associated with increased bipolar disorder-related traits. Specifically, the hypomania scale of the General Behavior Inventory was associated with an increased post-blue PIPR. Further, both the full hypomania and shortened '7 Up' scales were significantly predicted by PIPR, after age, sex and depressive traits were controlled. These findings suggest that increased sensitivity to light may be a risk factor for mood problems in the general population, and support the idea that hypersensitivity to light is a trait vulnerability for, rather than symptom of, bipolar disorder.
Address School of Psychological Sciences and Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: sean.cain@monash.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0165-1781 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31136914 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2510
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Author Bailey, L.A.; Brigham, R.M.; Bohn, S.J.; Boyles, J.G.; Smit, B.
Title An experimental test of the allotonic frequency hypothesis to isolate the effects of light pollution on bat prey selection Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal Oecologia
Volume 190 Issue 2 Pages 367–374
Keywords Animals; Ecology; bats; moths; insects; mammals
Abstract Artificial lights may be altering interactions between bats and moth prey. According to the allotonic frequency hypothesis (AFH), eared moths are generally unavailable as prey for syntonic bats (i.e., bats that use echolocation frequencies between 20 and 50 kHz within the hearing range of eared moths) due to the moths' ability to detect syntonic bat echolocation. Syntonic bats therefore feed mainly on beetles, flies, true bugs, and non-eared moths. The AFH is expected to be violated around lights where eared moths are susceptible to exploitation by syntonic bats because moths' evasive strategies become less effective. The hypothesis has been tested to date almost exclusively in areas with permanent lighting, where the effects of lights on bat diets are confounded with other aspects of human habitat alteration. We undertook diet analysis in areas with short-term, localized artificial lighting to isolate the effects of artificial lighting and determine if syntonic and allotonic bats (i.e., bats that use echolocation frequencies outside the hearing range of eared moths) consumed more moths under conditions of artificial lights than in natural darkness. We found that syntonic bats increased their consumption of moth prey under experimentally lit conditions, likely owing to a reduction in the ability of eared moths to evade the bats. Eared moths may increase in diets of generalist syntonic bats foraging around artificial light sources, as opposed to allotonic species and syntonic species with a more specialized diet.
Address Department of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown, 6140, South Africa. b.smit@ru.ac.za
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31139944 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2511
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Author Malek, I.; Haim, A.
Title Bright artificial light-at-night is associated with increased body mass, poor reproductive success, and compromised disease tolerance in Australian budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Integrative Zoology Abbreviated Journal Integr Zool
Volume 14 Issue 6 Pages 589-603
Keywords Animals; Birds; Australian budgerigars; Melopsittacus undulatus; Photoperiod; captive birds
Abstract Artificial light-at-night (ALAN) can cause circadian disruption and result in adverse behavioral and ecological effects in free-living birds, but studies on captive pet birds as companion animals have been infrequent. We studied the effects of exposure to bright ALAN on body mass, melatonin sulfate levels, reproduction, and disease severity in Australian budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) kept in captivity. During the experiment, birds were kept under outdoor temperature, humidity, and natural photoperiod from September to December. 48 birds were equally split into four groups (6 mating pairs each) and concurrently exposed to ALAN of 200 lux with different duration (0, 30, 60, and 90 min). Monthly observations were recorded for all dependent parameters. ALAN exposure increased mass gain and suppressed melatonin levels in a dose-dependent manner, especially during December. In addition, ALAN exposure in all duration groups decreased egg production and reduced hatchability from 61+/-14% in the ALAN-unexposed control group to 0% in the ALAN-exposed birds. Disease severity was also found to increase in line with the duration of ALAN exposure. In captive M. undulatus, ALAN exposure was demonstrated to affect photoperiodic regulation with subsequent excess mass gain, reproduction impairment, and increased susceptibility to infections plausibly through duration dose-dependent suppression of melatonin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a possible association between acute bright ALAN of increasing duration and both natural development of infections as well as reproductive cessation in captive birds. Our findings could be used to improve breeding conditions of captive birds.
Address The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology, University of Haifa 31905, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1749-4869 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31149779 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2512
Permanent link to this record