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Author Borck, P.C.; Batista, T.M.; Vettorazzi, J.F.; Soares, G.M.; Lubaczeuski, C.; Guan, D.; Boschero, A.C.; Vieira, E.; Lazar, M.A.; Carneiro, E.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nighttime light exposure enhances Rev-erbalpha-targeting microRNAs and contributes to hepatic steatosis Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental Abbreviated Journal Metabolism  
  Volume 85 Issue Pages 250-258  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) disrupts the biological rhythms and has been associated with the development of metabolic syndrome. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) display a critical role in fine-tuning the circadian system and energy metabolism. In this study, we aimed to assess whether altered miRNAs expression in the liver underlies metabolic disorders caused by disrupted biological rhythms. RESULTS: We found that C3H/HePas mice exposed to ALAN developed obesity, and hepatic steatosis, which was paralleled by decreased expression of Rev-erbalpha and up-regulation of its lipogenic targets ACL and FAS in liver. Furthermore, the expression of Rev-erbalpha-targeting miRNAs, miR-140-5p, 185-5p, 326-5p and 328-5p were increased in this group. Consistently, overexpression of these miRNAs in primary hepatocytes reduced Rev-erbalpha expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Importantly, overexpression of Rev-erbalpha-targeting miRNAs increased mRNA levels of Acly and Fasn. CONCLUSION: Thus, altered miRNA profile is an important mechanism underlying the disruption of the peripheral clock caused by exposure to ALAN, which could lead to hepatic steatosis.  
  Address Obesity and Comorbidities Research Center, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas/UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil; Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas/UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0026-0495 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29751019 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1891  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gaydecki, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Automated moth flight analysis in the vicinity of artificial light Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Bulletin of Entomological Research Abbreviated Journal Bull Entomol Res  
  Volume 109 Issue 1 Pages 127-140  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Animals  
  Abstract Instrumentation and software for the automated analysis of insect flight trajectories is described, intended for quantifying the behavioural dynamics of moths in the vicinity of artificial light. For its time, this moth imaging system was relatively advanced and revealed hitherto undocumented insights into moth flight behaviour. The illumination source comprised a 125 W mercury vapour light, operating in the visible and near ultraviolet wavelengths, mounted on top of a mobile telescopic mast at heights of 5 and 7.1 m, depending upon the experiment. Moths were imaged in early September, at night and in field conditions, using a ground level video camera with associated optics including a heated steering mirror, wide angle lens and an electronic image intensifier. Moth flight coordinates were recorded at a rate of 50 images per second (fields) and transferred to a computer using a light pen (the only non-automated operation in the processing sequence). Software extracted ground speed vectors and, by instantaneous subtraction of wind speed data supplied by fast-response anemometers, the airspeed vectors. Accumulated density profiles of the track data revealed that moths spend most of their time at a radius of between 40 and 50 cm from the source, and rarely fly directly above it, from close range. Furthermore, the proportion of insects caught by the trap as a proportion of the number influenced by the light (and within the field of view of the camera) was very low; of 1600 individual tracks recorded over five nights, a total of only 12 were caught. Although trap efficiency is strongly dependent on trap height, time of night, season, moonlight and weather, the data analysis confirmed that moths do not exhibit straightforward positive phototaxis. In general, trajectory patterns become more complex with reduced distance from the illumination, with higher recorded values of speeds and angular velocities. However, these characteristics are further qualified by the direction of travel of the insect; the highest accelerations tended to occur when the insect was at close range, but moving away from the source. Rather than manifesting a simple positive phototaxis, the trajectories were suggestive of disorientation. Based on the data and the complex behavioural response, mathematical models were developed that described ideal density distribution in calm air and light wind speed conditions. The models did not offer a physiological hypothesis regarding the behavioural changes, but rather were tools for quantification and prediction. Since the time that the system was developed, instrumentation, computers and software have advanced considerably, allowing much more to be achieved at a small fraction of the original cost. Nevertheless, the analytical tools remain useful for automated trajectory analysis of airborne insects.  
  Address School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester,Manchester M13 9PL,UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-4853 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29745349 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1895  
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Author Nelson, R.J.; Chbeir, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dark matters: effects of light at night on metabolism Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Nutr Soc  
  Volume 77 Issue 3 Pages 223-229  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Life on earth has evolved during the past several billion years under relatively bright days and dark night conditions. The wide-spread adoption of electric lights during the past century exposed animals, both human and non-human, to significant light at night for the first time in their evolutionary history. Endogenous circadian clocks depend on light to entrain to the external daily environment and seasonal rhythms depend on clear nightly melatonin signals to assess time of year. Thus, light at night can derange temporal adaptations. Indeed, disruption of naturally evolved light-dark cycles results in several physiological and behavioural changes with potentially serious implications for physiology, behaviour and mood. In this review, data from night-shift workers on their elevated risk for metabolic disorders, as well as data from animal studies will be discussed. Night-shift workers are predisposed to obesity and dysregulated metabolism that may result from disrupted circadian rhythms. Although studies in human subjects are correlative, animal studies have revealed several mechanisms through which light at night may exert its effects on metabolism by disrupting circadian rhythms that are associated with inflammation, both in the brain and in the periphery. Disruption of the typical timing of food intake is a key effect of light at night and subsequent metabolic dysregulation. Strategies to avoid the effects of light at night on body mass dysregulation should be pursued.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience,The Ohio State University,Columbus, OH 43210,USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0029-6651 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29747703 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1896  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shen, J.; Zhu, X.; Gu, Y.; Zhang, C.; Huang, J.; Qing, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Toxic effect of visible light on Drosophila lifespan depending upon diet protein content Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences Abbreviated Journal J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci  
  Volume 74 Issue 2 Pages 163-167  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract We investigated the toxic effect of visible light on Drosophila lifespan in both sexes. The toxic effect of ultraviolet (UV) light on organisms is well known. However, the effects of illumination with visible light remain unclear. Here, we found that visible light could be toxic to Drosophila survival, depending on the protein content in diet. In addition, further analysis revealed significant interaction between light and sex, and showed that strong light shortened life span by causing opposite direction changes in mortality rate parameters in females versus males. Our findings suggest that photoageing may be a general phenomenon, and support the theory of sexual antagonistic pleiotropy in aging intervention. The results caution that exposure to visible light could be hazardous to life span and suggest that identification of the underlying mechanism would allow better understanding of aging intervention.  
  Address College of Life Information Science & Instrument Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1079-5006 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29506144 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1903  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bian, Z.; Yang, Q.; Li, T.; Cheng, R.; Barnett, Y.; Lu, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Study of the beneficial effects of green light on lettuce grown under short-term continuous red and blue light-emitting diodes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Physiologia Plantarum Abbreviated Journal Physiol Plant  
  Volume 164 Issue 2 Pages 226-240  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Red and blue light are the most important light spectra for driving photosynthesis to produce adequate crop yield. It is also believed that green light may contribute to adaptations to growth. However, the effects of green light, which can trigger specific and necessary responses of plant growth, have been underestimated in the past. In this study, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) was exposed to different continuous light (CL) conditions for 48 h by a combination of red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) supplemented with or without green LEDs, in an environmental-controlled growth chamber. Green light supplementation enhanced photosynthetic capacity by increasing net photosynthetic rates (Pn ), maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv /Fm ), electron transport for carbon fixation (JPSII ) and chlorophyll content in plants under the CL treatment. Green light decreased malondialdehyde and H2 O2 accumulation by increasing the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11) after 24 h of CL. Supplemental green light significantly increased the expression of photosynthetic genes LHCb and PsbA from 6 to 12 h, and these gene expression were maintained at higher levels than those under other light conditions between 12 and 24 h. However, a notable down-regulation of both LHCb and PsbA was observed during 24 to 48 h. These results indicate that the effects of green light on lettuce plant growth, via enhancing activity of particular components of antioxidantive enzyme system and promoting of LHCb and PsbA expression to maintain higher photosynthetic capacity, alleviated a number of the negative effects caused by CL.  
  Address School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Science, Brackenhurst Campus, Nottingham Trent University, NG25 0QF, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9317 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29493775 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1905  
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