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Author Foth, M., Caldwell, G.A.
Title More-than-human media architecture Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Architecture; Lighting; Planning
Abstract We consider some of the planetary conditions and global circumstances that both research and practice of media architecture are embedded within, such as climate change, pollution, resource consumption, and loss of biodiversity. While there has been a notable increase in emphasis on participation and engagement in design and use, with the aim to increase the involvement of diverse and often marginalised citizens, a human-centred approach to media architecture comes with its own set of problems. In this paper, we want to draw the attention of the media architecture community to the fallacy of human exceptionalism and anthropocentrism. We present a critical review of examples of media architecture projects and installations that question our understanding of urban space as separate from nature, and designed primarily for humans and just humans. Informed by studies in disciplines such as science and technology studies, critical geography, urban planning, and interaction design, we use insights derived from our review to discuss ways towards a more-than-human approach to media architecture. We conclude by proposing for discussion nascent design considerations for media architecture to go beyond the needs of just humans and to consider new ways to appreciate and cater for our broader ecological entanglements with plants, animals, and the environment at large.
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Area Expedition Conference Media Architecture Biennale, 13-16 November 2018, Beijing, China
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2081
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Author Underhill, V.A.; Höbel, G.
Title Mate choice behavior of female Eastern Gray Treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) is robust to anthropogenic light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology
Volume 124 Issue 8 Pages 537-548
Keywords Animals
Abstract Human activities are drastically changing the amount of artificial light entering natural habitats. Because light pollution alters the sensory environment, it may interfere with behaviors ranging from prey detection and vigilance to mate choice. Here, we test the hypothesis that anthropogenic light pollution affects the mate choice behavior of female Eastern Gray Treefrogs (Hyla versicolor). We tested this hypothesis under two experimental light treatments that simulate the light pollution created by streetlights (expansion of lit areas and increased light intensity), and the light pollution created by headlights of passing vehicles (rapid fluctuations between bright and dark conditions). The hypothesis predicts that females tested under conditions simulating light pollution will show behavioral changes geared toward mitigating detection by predators, such as relaxed preferences, decreased choosiness for the normally preferred call, and differences in approach behavior (either more directional, faster, or stealthier movements, or no approach at all). Contrary to our prediction, we found that light pollution did not affect mate choice behavior in Gray Treefrogs, and should therefore neither interfere with population persistence nor affect the sexual selection regimes on male call traits of this species. However, we caution that this result does not imply that anthropogenic light pollution is of no concern for amphibian conservation, because behavioral responses to variation in nocturnal light levels (both in the natural as well as anthropogenically enhanced range) seem to be highly species‐specific in anurans. We encourage additional studies to help gage the vulnerability of anurans to anthropogenic light pollution.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0179-1613 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2090
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Author Froidevaux, J.S.P.; Fialas, P.C.; Jones, G.; Pettorelli, N.; Merchant, N.
Title Catching insects while recording bats: impacts of light trapping on acoustic sampling Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal Remote Sens Ecol Conserv
Volume 4 Issue 3 Pages 240-247
Keywords Animals
Abstract Collecting information on bat prey availability usually involves the use of light traps to capture moths and flies that constitute the main prey items of most insectivorous bats. However, despite the recent awareness on the adverse effects of light on bats, little is known regarding the potential impacts of light trapping on the bat sampling outcomes when passive acoustic sampling and light trapping are implemented simultaneously. Using a before–after experimental design that involved the installation of a 6 W actinic light trap 1 m away from the bat detector, we tested the predictions that (1) slow‐flying bat species will be less active when the light trap is present, while the opposite will be true for fast‐flying species; and (2) bat species richness will be lower at lit conditions compared to dark ones. Our results suggest that the use of light traps in combination with bat detectors may considerably influence the outcomes of acoustic sampling. Although the activity of fast‐flying bat species did not differ between the two treatments, we found that the activity of slow‐flying ones such as Rhinolophus ferrumequinum and Rhinolophus hipposideros decreased significantly at lit conditions. Furthermore, we recorded fewer bat species when the light trap was deployed. To overcome this issue, we strongly recommend either (1) placing light traps at a considerable distance from bat detectors; or (2) using light traps during the night that follows the bat sampling if sampling needs to be at the same position; or (3) deploying non‐attractant insect traps such as Malaise traps if Lepidoptera is not the main order targeted.
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ISSN 2056-3485 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2092
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Author Stone, T.
Title Re-envisioning the Nocturnal Sublime: On the Ethics and Aesthetics of Nighttime Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Topoi Abbreviated Journal
Volume In press Issue Pages
Keywords Society
Abstract Grounded in the practical problem of light pollution, this paper examines the aesthetic dimensions of urban and natural darkness, and its impact on how we perceive and evaluate nighttime lighting. It is argued that competing notions of the sublime, manifested through artificial illumination and the natural night sky respectively, reinforce a geographical dualism between cities and wilderness. To challenge this spatial differentiation, recent work in urban-focused environmental ethics, as well as environmental aesthetics, are utilized to envision the moral and aesthetic possibilities of a new urban nocturnal sublime. Through articulating the aspirations and constraints of a new urban nocturnal experience, this paper elucidates the axiological dimensions of light pollution, draws attention to nightscapes as a site of importance for urban-focused (environmental) philosophy, and examines the enduring relevance of the sublime for both the design of nighttime illumination and the appreciation of the night sky.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2098
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Author Skandali, C.; Lambiri, Y.S.
Title Optimization of Urban Street Lighting Conditions Focusing On Energy Saving, Safety and Users’ Needs Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Contemporary Urban Affairs Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue 3 Pages 112-121
Keywords Lighting; Economics; Planning
Abstract The outdoor lighting constitutes a significant part of the night activities of people in contemporary cities. Nevertheless, in many cases, this may result in the increasing and irrational use of it affecting the users of public areas, the environment and driving safety. The subject of this paper is to extend the discussion on the subject, to provide answers and to suggest methods for the improvement of the existing conditions in urban street lighting through the use of new technologies and smart lighting management systems, with the aim of achieving a smooth relationship between the user’s needs, safety, sustainability, quality of life and energy saving.
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2101
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