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Author Persons, W.E.; Eason, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human activity and habitat type affect perceived predation risk in urban white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology  
  Volume 123 Issue 5 Pages 348-356  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Predation risk is one of the largest costs associated with foraging in small mammals. Small mammals select microhabitat features such as tree and shrub canopy cover, woody debris and vegetative ground cover that can lower the risk of detection from predators and provide greater protection if discovered. Small mammals also increase foraging activity and decrease selection for cover when cloud cover increases and moon illumination is less. Often researchers assume small mammals in urban areas respond to these cues in the same manner as in natural areas, but these cues themselves are altered in urban zones. In this study, we investigated how Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) and coarse woody debris (CWD) affected giving-up density (GUD) in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). Each of three habitat treatments (open flood channel, the edge and interior of the honeysuckle patch) contained cover treatments with coarse woody debris present or absent. The six treatment combinations were compared to environmental variables (temperature, humidity and illumination) and habitat variables to test their effect on GUD. Peromyscus leucopus foraged to lower densities in areas with CWD present and also under the honeysuckle canopy, using this invasive shrub to decrease predation risk, potentially increasing survivability within this urban park. Increased human presence negatively affected foraging behavior across treatments. Human presence and light pollution significantly influenced P. leucopus, modifying their foraging behavior and demonstrating that both fine- and coarse-scale urban factors can affect small mammals. Foraging increased as humidity increased, particularly under the honeysuckle canopy. Changes in illumination due to moonlight and cloud cover did not affect foraging behavior, suggesting urban light pollution may have altered behavioral responses to changes in light levels. Lonicera maackii seemed to facilitate foraging in P. leucopus, even though it adversely affects the plant community, suggesting that its impact may not be entirely negative.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0179-1613 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1642  
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Author Li, C.; Li, G.; Zhu, Y.; Ge, Y.; Kung, H.-te; Wu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A likelihood-based spatial statistical transformation model (LBSSTM) of regional economic development using DMSP/OLS time series and nighttime light imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Spatial Statistics Abbreviated Journal Spatial Statistics  
  Volume 21 Issue B Pages 421-439  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In a regional economy, the central city of a metropolitan area has a radiative effect and an accumulative effect on its surrounding cities. Considering the limitations of traditional data sources (e.g., its subjectivity) and the advantages of nighttime light data, including its objectivity, availability and cyclicity, this paper proposes a likelihood spatial statistical transformation model (LBSSTM) to invert for the gross domestic product (GDP) of the surrounding cities, using time series of Sum of Lights (SOL) data covering the central city and taking advantage of the economic and spatial association between the central city and the surrounding cities within a metropolitan area and the correlation between SOL and GDP. The Wuhan Metropolitan Area is chosen to verify the model using time series analysis and exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA). The experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed LBSSTM. The prediction accuracy of our model is verified by cross-validation using data from 1998, 2004 and 2011, based on the 3σ rule. This model can quantitatively express the agglomeration and diffusion effect of the central city and reveal the spatial pattern of this effect. The results of this work are potentially useful in making spatio-temporal economic projections and filling in missing data from some regions, as well as gaining a deeper quantitative and spatio-temporal understanding of the laws underlying regional economic development.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2211-6753 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1644  
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Author Szekeres, P.; Wilson, A.D.M.; Haak, C.R.; Danylchuk, A.J.; Brownscombe, J.W.; Elvidge, C.K.; Shultz, A.D.; Birnie-Gauvin, K.; Cooke, S.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does coastal light pollution alter the nocturnal behavior and blood physiology of juvenile bonefish (Albula vulpes)? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Bulletin of Marine Science Abbreviated Journal bms  
  Volume 93 Issue 2 Pages 491-505  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light pollution is a prevalent, but often overlooked, ecological concern in a variety of ecosystems. Marine environments are subjected to artificial lighting from coastal development, in addition to offshore sources, such as fishing vessels, oil platforms and cruise ships. Fish species that rely on nearshore habitats are most significantly impacted by coastal light pollution, as they are often limited to nearshore habitats due to predation risk in deeper offshore waters, particularly as juveniles. Juvenile bonefish [Albula vulpes (Linnaeus, 1758)] inhabit the nearshore environment, and are therefore exposed to coastal lighting and other watershed development impacts. Here, we assessed juvenile bonefish behavior and physiology in the presence of two common light sources: constant street lighting (high pressure sodium) and intermittent car headlights (H4 halogen). The behavioral responses were compared with a night and day control, whereas physiology was compared only with a night control. Each behavioral trial had two time periods: light and recovery (2 hrs each). Physiology (blood glucose and whole body cortisol) was assessed after an overnight 8-hr exposure. The results suggest that there is no effect of light pollution on the swimming behavior or whole body cortisol of juvenile bonefish, but that both forms of light pollution resulted in elevated blood glucose concentrations (a simple stress indicator) relative to controls, with constant light glucose levels being significantly higher. Further research is needed to understand the ecological consequences of light pollution on bonefish and other coastal marine fish using additional endpoints, assessing fish over longer time periods, and ideally combining data from the laboratory and the field.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-4977 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1658  
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Author Jechow, A.; Kolláth, Z.; Ribas, S.J.; Spoelstra, H.; Hölker, F.; Kyba, C.C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Imaging and mapping the impact of clouds on skyglow with all-sky photometry Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages Article number 6741  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract Artificial skyglow is constantly growing on a global scale, with potential ecological consequences ranging up to affecting biodiversity. To understand these consequences, worldwide mapping of skyglow for all weather conditions is urgently required. In particular, the amplification of skyglow by clouds needs to be studied, as clouds can extend the reach of skyglow into remote areas not affected by light pollution on clear nights. Here we use commercial digital single lens reflex cameras with fisheye lenses for all-sky photometry. We track the reach of skyglow from a peri-urban into a remote area on a clear and a partly cloudy night by performing transects from the Spanish town of Balaguer towards Montsec Astronomical Park. From one single all-sky image, we extract zenith luminance, horizontal and scalar illuminance. While zenith luminance reaches near-natural levels at 5 km distance from the town on the clear night, similar levels are only reached at 27 km on the partly cloudy night. Our results show the dramatic increase of the reach of skyglow even for moderate cloud coverage at this site. The powerful and easy-to-use method promises to be widely applicable for studies of ecological light pollution on a global scale also by non-specialists in photometry.  
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  Language (up) Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1691  
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Author Rydell, J.; Eklöf, J.; Sánchez-Navarro, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Age of enlightenment: long-term effects of outdoor aesthetic lights on bats in churches Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.  
  Volume 4 Issue 8 Pages 161077  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract We surveyed 110 country churches in south-western Sweden for presence of brown long-eared bats Plecotus auritus in summer 2016 by visual inspection and/or evening emergence counts. Each church was also classified according to the presence and amount of aesthetic directional lights (flood-lights) aimed on its walls and tower from the outside. Sixty-one of the churches had previously been surveyed by one of us (J.R.) between 1980 and 1990, before lights were installed on Swedish churches, using the same methods. Churches with bat colonies had decreased significantly in frequency from 61% in 1980s to 38% by 2016. All abandoned churches had been fitted with flood-lights in the period between the two surveys. The loss of bat colonies from lit churches was highly significant and most obvious when lights were applied from all directions, leaving no dark corridor for the bats to leave and return to the roost. In contrast, in churches that were not lit, all of 13 bat colonies remained after 25+ years between the surveys. Lighting of churches and other historical buildings is a serious threat to the long-term survival and reproduction of light-averse bats such as Plecotus spp. and other slow-flying species. Bat roosts are strictly protected according to the EU Habitats Directive and the EUROBATS agreement. Lighting of buildings for aesthetic purposes is becoming a serious environmental issue, because important bat roosts are destroyed in large numbers, and the problem should be handled accordingly. As a start, installation of flood-lights on historical buildings should at least require an environmental impact assessment (EIA).  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1698  
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