|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author He, C.; Ma, L.; Zhou, L.; Kan, H.D.; Zhang, Y.; Ma, W.C.; Chen, B.
Title Exploring the mechanisms of heat wave vulnerability at the urban scale based on the application of big data and artificial societies Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environ Int
Volume 127 Issue Pages 573-583
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Rapid urbanisation has altered the vulnerability of urban areas to heat wave disasters. There is an urgent need to identify the factors underlying the effect of heat waves on human health and the areas that are most vulnerable to heat waves. In this study, we plan to integrate indices associated with heat wave vulnerability based on meteorological observation data, remote sensing data and point of interest (POI) data; analyse the influence of urbanisation on the urban vulnerability environment; and explore the relationship between the vulnerability environment and heat-wave-related mortality. Finally, we attempt to map the spatial distribution of high heat-wave-related mortality risk based on the results of heat wave vulnerability study and artificial society. The results reveal that 1) there are differences in the influence of urbanisation on heat wave exposure, sensitivity and adaptability; 2) the exposure and sensitivity level effects on the lower limit of health impacts and the adaptability level effects on the upper limit of the health impact from heat wave in a given study area; and 3) areas vulnerable to the effects of heat waves are not confined to the city centre, which implies that residents living in suburban areas are also vulnerable to heat waves. Finally, this study not only explores the factors contributing to the impacts of heat waves but also describes the spatial distribution of the risk of disaster-associated mortality, thereby providing direct scientific guidance that can be used by cities to address heat wave disasters in the future.
Address College of System Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, China. Electronic address: nudtcb9372@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30986739 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2326
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Saini, C.; Hutton, P.; Gao, S.; Simpson, R.K.; Giraudeau, M.; Sepp, T.; Webb, E.; McGraw, K.J.
Title Exposure to artificial light at night increases innate immune activity during development in a precocial bird Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol
Volume 233 Issue Pages 84-88
Keywords Animals; Birds; king quail; Excalfactoria chinensis; immunity
Abstract Humans have greatly altered Earth's night-time photic environment via the production of artificial light at night (ALAN; e.g. street lights, car traffic, billboards, lit buildings). ALAN is a problem of growing importance because it may significantly disrupt the seasonal and daily physiological rhythms and behaviors of animals. There has been considerable interest in the impacts of ALAN on health of humans and other animals, but most of this work has centered on adults and we know comparatively little about effects on young animals. We exposed 3-week-old king quail (Excalfactoria chinensis) to a constant overnight blue-light regime for 6 weeks and assessed weekly bactericidal activity of plasma against Escherichia coli – a commonly employed metric of innate immunity in animals. We found that chronic ALAN exposure significantly increased bactericidal activity and that this elevation in immune performance manifested at different developmental time points in males and females. Whether this short-term increase in immune activity can be extended to wild animals, and whether ALAN-mediated increases in immune activity have positive or negative fitness effects are unknown and will provide interesting avenues for future studies.
Address School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, United States of America. Electronic address: Kevin.McGraw@asu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30974186 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2291
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, Y.; Cheng, S.; Li, L.; Zhao, Y.; Shen, W.; Sun, X.
Title Light-exposure at night impairs mouse ovary development via cell apoptosis and DNA damage Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Bioscience Reports Abbreviated Journal Biosci Rep
Volume 39 Issue Pages BSR20181464
Keywords Human Health; Animals; mouse models; ovaries
Abstract The alternation of light and dark rhythm causes a series of physiological, biochemical and metabolic changes in animals, which also alters the growth and development of animals, and feeding, migration, reproduction and other behavioral activities. In recent years, many studies have reported the effects of long-term (more than 6 weeks) illumination on ovarian growth and development. In this study, we observed the damage, repair and apoptosis of ovarian DNA in a short period of illumination. The results showed that, in short time (less than 2 weeks) illumination conditions, the 24 hrs-light treatment caused the reduction of total ovarian follicle number and downregulation of circadian clock related genes. Furthermore, the changed levels of serum sex hormones were also detected after 24 hrs-light exposure, of which the concentrations of LH (luteinizing hormone), FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) and E2 (estradiol) were increased, but the concentration of PROG (progesterone) was decreased. Moreover, 24 hrs-light exposure increased the expression of DNA damage and repair related genes, the number of TUNEL and RAD51 positive cells. These results indicated that 24 hrs-light exposure for 4 days, 8days and 12 days increased DNA damage and cell apoptosis, thereby affecting the development of ovary.
Address Qingdao agricultural university, Qingdao, China; xfsun@qau.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Portland Press Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0144-8463 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30962269 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2293
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bapary, M.A.J.; Takano, J.-I.; Soma, S.; Sankai, T.
Title Effect of blue LED light and antioxidants potential in a somatic cell Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Cell Biology International Abbreviated Journal Cell Biol Int
Volume 43 Issue 11 Pages 1296-1306
Keywords Cells; Biology; LED; blue light; Antioxidants; cell death
Abstract Light is an indispensable part of routine laboratory works in which conventional light is generally used. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have come to replace the conventional light thus could be a potent target in biomedical studies. Since blue light is a major component of visible light wavelength, in this study, using a somatic cell from African green monkey kidney, we assessed the possible consequences of blue spectra of LED light in future animal experiments and proposed a potent mitigation against light induced damages. COS-7 cells were exposed to blue LED light (450 nm) and the growth and DNA damage were assessed at different exposure times. A higher suppression in cell growth and viability was observed under a longer period of blue LED light exposure. The number of apoptotic cells increased as light exposure time was prolonged. Reactive oxygen species generation was also elevated in accordance to the extension of light exposure times. A comparison to dark-maintained cells revealed that the upregulation of ROS by blue LED light plays a significant role in causing cellular dysfunction in DNA in a time-dependent manner. In turn, antioxidant treatment has shown to improve the cell growth and viability under blue LED light conditions. This indicates that antioxidants are potential against blue LED light-induced somatic cell damage. It is expected that this study will contribute to the understanding of the basic mechanism of somatic cell death under visible light and to maximize the beneficial use of LED light in future animal experiments.
Address Tsukuba Primate Research Center, National Institutes of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, Ibaraki, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1065-6995 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30958611 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2328
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lundberg, L.; Sienkiewicz, Z.; Anthony, D.C.; Broom, K.A.
Title Effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on circadian rhythm control in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Bioelectromagnetics Abbreviated Journal Bioelectromagnetics
Volume 40 Issue 4 Pages 250-259
Keywords Animals; mouse models; magnetic fields
Abstract Artificial light and power frequency magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the built environment. Light is a potent zeitgeber but it is unclear whether power frequency magnetic fields can influence circadian rhythm control. To study this possibility, 8-12-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were exposed for 30 min starting at zeitgeber time 14 (ZT14, 2 h into the dark period of the day) to 50 Hz magnetic fields at 580 muT using a pair of Helmholtz coils and/or a blue LED light at 700 lux or neither. Our experiments revealed an acute adrenal response to blue light, in terms of increased adrenal per1 gene expression, increased serum corticosterone levels, increased time spent sleeping, and decreased locomotor activity (in all cases, P < 0.0001) compared to an unexposed control group. There appeared to be no modulating effect of the magnetic fields on the response to light, and there was also no effect of the magnetic fields alone (in both cases, P > 0.05) except for a decrease in locomotor activity (P < 0.03). Gene expression of the cryptochromes cry1 and cry2 in the adrenals, liver, and hippocampus was also not affected by exposures (in all cases, P > 0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that 50 Hz magnetic fields do not significantly affect the acute light response to a degree that can be detected in the adrenal response.
Address Public Health England, Chilton, United Kingdom;
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0197-8462 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30945762 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2289
Permanent link to this record