|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Czeisler, C.A.
Title Housing Immigrant Children – The Inhumanity of Constant Illumination Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The New England Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal N Engl J Med
Volume 379 Issue 2 Pages e3
Keywords Human Health; Commentary
Abstract
Address From the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and the Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School – both in Boston
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-4793 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:29932841 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1942
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Porcheret, K.; Wald, L.; Fritschi, L.; Gerkema, M.; Gordijn, M.; Merrrow, M.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Rock, D.; Sletten, T.L.; Warman, G.; Wulff, K.; Roenneberg, T.; Foster, R.G.
Title Chronotype and environmental light exposure in a student population Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 35 Issue 10 Pages 1365-1374
Keywords Human Health
Abstract In humans and most other species, changes in the intensity and duration of light provide a critical set of signals for the synchronisation of the circadian system to the astronomical day. The timing of activity within the 24 h day defines an individual's chronotype, i.e. morning, intermediate or evening type. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between environmental light exposure, due to geographical location, on the chronotype of university students. Over 6 000 university students from cities in the Northern Hemisphere (Oxford, Munich and Groningen) and Southern Hemisphere (Perth, Melbourne and Auckland) completed the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire. In parallel, light measures (daily irradiance, timing of sunrise and sunset) were compiled from satellite or ground stations at each of these locations. Our data shows that later mid-sleep point on free days (corrected for oversleep on weekends MFSsc) is associated with (i) residing further from the equator, (ii) a later sunset, (iii) spending more time outside and (iv) waking from sleep significantly after sunrise. However, surprisingly, MSFsc did not correlate with daily light intensity at the different geographical locations. Although these findings appear to contradict earlier studies suggesting that in the wider population increased light exposure is associated with an earlier chronotype, our findings are derived exclusively from a student population aged between 17 and 26 years. We therefore suggest that the age and occupation of our population increase the likelihood that these individuals will experience relatively little light exposure in the morning whilst encountering more light exposure later in the day, when light has a delaying effect upon the circadian system.
Address a Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute (SCNi), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences , University of Oxford , Oxford , UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:29913073 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1962
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Longcore, T.; Rodriguez, A.; Witherington, B.; Penniman, J.F.; Herf, L.; Herf, M.
Title Rapid assessment of lamp spectrum to quantify ecological effects of light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 511-521
Keywords Lighting; Ecology; Animals; Vision
Abstract For many decades, the spectral composition of lighting was determined by the type of lamp, which also influenced potential effects of outdoor lights on species and ecosystems. Light-emitting diode (LED) lamps have dramatically increased the range of spectral profiles of light that is economically viable for outdoor lighting. Because of the array of choices, it is necessary to develop methods to predict the effects of different spectral profiles without conducting field studies, especially because older lighting systems are being replaced rapidly. We describe an approach to predict responses of exemplar organisms and groups to lamps of different spectral output by calculating an index based on action spectra from behavioral or visual characteristics of organisms and lamp spectral irradiance. We calculate relative response indices for a range of lamp types and light sources and develop an index that identifies lamps that minimize predicted effects as measured by ecological, physiological, and astronomical indices. Using these assessment metrics, filtered yellow-green and amber LEDs are predicted to have lower effects on wildlife than high pressure sodium lamps, while blue-rich lighting (e.g., K >/= 2200) would have greater effects. The approach can be updated with new information about behavioral or visual responses of organisms and used to test new lighting products based on spectrum. Together with control of intensity, direction, and duration, the approach can be used to predict and then minimize the adverse effects of lighting and can be tailored to individual species or taxonomic groups.
Address f.lux Software LLC, Los Angeles, California
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:29894022 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1940
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aulsebrook, A.E.; Jones, T.M.; Mulder, R.A.; Lesku, J.A.
Title Impacts of artificial light at night on sleep: A review and prospectus Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 409-418
Keywords Animals; Human Activities; Review
Abstract Natural cycles of light and darkness govern the timing of most aspects of animal behavior and physiology. Artificial light at night (ALAN)-a recent and pervasive form of pollution-can mask natural photoperiodic cues and interfere with biological rhythms. One such rhythm vulnerable to perturbation is the sleep-wake cycle. ALAN may greatly influence sleep in humans and wildlife, particularly in animals that sleep predominantly at night. There has been some recent evidence for impacts of ALAN on sleep, but critical questions remain. Some of these can be addressed by adopting approaches already entrenched in sleep research. In this paper, we review the current evidence for impacts of ALAN on sleep, highlight gaps in our understanding, and suggest opportunities for future research.
Address La Trobe University, School of Life Sciences, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:29869374 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1933
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Durrant, J.; Botha, L.M.; Green, M.P.; Jones, T.M.
Title Artificial light at night prolongs juvenile development time in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol
Volume 330 Issue 4 Pages 225-233
Keywords Animals
Abstract A growing body of evidence exists to support a detrimental effect of the presence of artificial light at night (ALAN) on life-history and fitness traits. However, few studies simultaneously investigate multiple traits and the life stages at which changes manifest. We experimentally manipulated ALAN intensities, within those found in the natural environment, to explore the consequences for growth, survival, and reproductive success of the field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. We reared crickets from egg to adult under a daily light-cycle consisting of 12 hr bright daylight (2,600 lx) followed by either 12 hr darkness (0 lx) or dim-light environments (1, 10, or 100 lx). We found egg hatch, adult survival, and reproductive measures were largely comparable for all treatments. However, juvenile development time (number of days from egg to adult) was on average 10 days (14%) longer and adults were also larger when crickets were exposed to any light at night (1, 10, or 100 lx). Our data demonstrate that chronic lifetime exposure to ALAN can modulate the timing of life-history events and may disrupt phenology to a similar extent as other abiotic factors.
Address The School of BioSciences, Faculty of Science, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1552-5007 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:29862646 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1925
Permanent link to this record