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Author White, A.J.; Weinberg, C.R.; Park, Y.-M.; D'Aloisio, A.A.; Vogtmann, E.; Nichols, H.B.; Sandler, D.P.
Title Sleep characteristics, light at night and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer
Volume 141 Issue 11 Pages 2204-2214
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Increasing numbers of women in the US are getting too little sleep. Inadequate sleep has been associated with impaired metabolic function and endocrine disruption. Sister Study cohort participants (n = 50,884), completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires on sleep patterns. Incident breast cancers estrogen receptor (ER) status of the tumor were ascertained from questionnaires and medical records. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Analyses of sleep characteristics reported at the first follow-up interview included only participants who were breast cancer-free at time of follow-up interview. Over approximately 7 years of follow-up, 2,736 breast cancer cases (invasive and ductal carcinoma in situ) were diagnosed. There was little evidence that usual sleep duration or other sleep characteristics were associated with breast cancer. However, relative to those with no difficulty sleeping, women who reported having difficulty sleeping >/= 4 nights a week were at an increased risk of overall (HR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.09-1.61) and postmenopausal breast cancer (HR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.24-1.85). Risk of ER+ invasive cancer was elevated for women who reported having a light or television on in the room while sleeping (HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 0.97-1.47) or who typically got less sleep than they needed to feel their best (HR = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.98-1.50). In our study, most sleep characteristics, including sleep duration, were not associated with an increased risk although higher risk was observed for some markers of inadequate or poor quality sleep.
Address Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:28791684 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1708
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Author Raap, T.; Pinxten, R.; Eens, M.
Title Rigorous field experiments are essential to understand the genuine severity of light pollution and to identify possible solutions Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume 23 Issue 12 Pages 5024-5026
Keywords commentary; animals
Abstract Ouyang et al. (2017; hereafter O2017) claim to have offered evidence that light pollution affects the health of free-living great tits (Parus major). Since 2012, they illuminated forests with either white, green, red or no artificial light at night (ALAN; Figure 1). Individuals in the white light treatment showed an increase in nightly activity in March 2014, which was linked to changes in health and physiology from March to May 2014. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology and Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:28746741 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1695
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Author Riveros, J.L.; Correa, L.M.; Schuler, G.
Title Daylight effect on melatonin secretion in adult female guanacos (Lama guanicoe) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Reproduction in Domestic Animals = Zuchthygiene Abbreviated Journal Reprod Domest Anim
Volume 52 Issue 6 Pages 1129-1132
Keywords Animals
Abstract The wild South American camelids developed a strategy of seasonal reproduction during spring and summer with singleton birth. The photoperiod is one of the factors that may modulate this seasonality where light would be translated into a hormonal signal. This study evaluated the influence of changes in daily light intensity on melatonin concentration in captive guanacos under a long-day photoperiod (16 hr light/8 hr dark; 33 '28'S). Mean melatonin concentration was 28.3 +/- 20.3 pg/ml, with a maximum of 52.14 +/- 17.19 pg/ml at 23:30 and minimum of 14.29 +/- 6.64 pg/ml at 08:30 (p < .001). There was a negative association between light intensity and melatonin concentration (r = -0.57; p < .001). The results indicate that guanacos respond to variation in daily environmental light with a hormonal response and point to a circannual rhythm as a function of the photoperiod.
Address Departamento de Ciencias Animales, Facultad de Agronomia e Ingenieria Forestal, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0936-6768 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:28731219 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1688
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Author Hatori, M.; Gronfier, C.; Van Gelder, R.N.; Bernstein, P.S.; Carreras, J.; Panda, S.; Marks, F.; Sliney, D.; Hunt, C.E.; Hirota, T.; Furukawa, T.; Tsubota, K.
Title Global rise of potential health hazards caused by blue light-induced circadian disruption in modern aging societies Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication NPJ Aging and Mechanisms of Disease Abbreviated Journal NPJ Aging Mech Dis
Volume 3 Issue Pages 9
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract Mammals receive light information through the eyes, which perform two major functions: image forming vision to see objects and non-image forming adaptation of physiology and behavior to light. Cone and rod photoreceptors form images and send the information via retinal ganglion cells to the brain for image reconstruction. In contrast, nonimage-forming photoresponses vary widely from adjustment of pupil diameter to adaptation of the circadian clock. nonimage-forming responses are mediated by retinal ganglion cells expressing the photopigment melanopsin. Melanopsin-expressing cells constitute 1-2% of retinal ganglion cells in the adult mammalian retina, are intrinsically photosensitive, and integrate photic information from rods and cones to control nonimage-forming adaptation. Action spectra of ipRGCs and of melanopsin photopigment peak around 480 nm blue light. Understanding melanopsin function lets us recognize considerable physiological effects of blue light, which is increasingly important in our modern society that uses light-emitting diode. Misalignment of circadian rhythmicity is observed in numerous conditions, including aging, and is thought to be involved in the development of age-related disorders, such as depression, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and cancer. The appropriate regulation of circadian rhythmicity by proper lighting is therefore essential. This perspective introduces the potential risks of excessive blue light for human health through circadian rhythm disruption and sleep deprivation. Knowing the positive and negative aspects, this study claims the importance of being exposed to light at optimal times and intensities during the day, based on the concept of the circadian clock, ultimately to improve quality of life to have a healthy and longer life.
Address Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo Japan.0000 0004 1936 9959grid.26091.3c
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2056-3973 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:28649427; PMCID:PMC5473809 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2462
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Author Hunter, C.M.; Figueiro, M.G.
Title Measuring Light at Night and Melatonin Levels in Shift Workers: A Review of the Literature Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Biological Research for Nursing Abbreviated Journal Biol Res Nurs
Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages 365-374
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Shift work, especially that involving rotating and night shifts, is associated with an increased risk of diseases, including cancer. Attempts to explain the association between shift work and cancer in particular have focused on the processes of melatonin production and suppression. One hypothesis postulates that exposure to light at night (LAN) suppresses melatonin, whose production is known to slow the development of cancerous cells, while another proposes that circadian disruption associated with shift work, and not just LAN, increases health risks. This review focuses on six studies that employed quantitative measurement of LAN and melatonin levels to assess cancer risks in shift workers. These studies were identified via searching the PubMed database for peer-reviewed, English-language articles examining the links between shift work, LAN, and disease using the terms light at night, circadian disruption, health, risk, cancer, shift work, or rotating shift. While the results indicate a growing consensus on the relationship between disease risks (particularly cancer) and circadian disruption associated with shift work, the establishment of a direct link between LAN and disease has been impeded by contradictory studies and a lack of consistent, quantitative methods for measuring LAN in the research to date. Better protocols for assessing personal LAN exposure are required, particularly those employing calibrated devices that measure and sample exposure to workplace light conditions, to accurately assess LAN's effects on the circadian system and disease. Other methodologies, such as measuring circadian disruption and melatonin levels in the field, may also help to resolve discrepancies in the findings.
Address 1 Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1099-8004 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:28627309; PMCID:PMC5862149 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2458
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