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Author Walker, W.H. 2nd; Bumgarner, J.R.; Walton, J.C.; Liu, J.A.; Melendez-Fernandez, O.H.; Nelson, R.J.; DeVries, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Pollution and Cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci  
  Volume 21 Issue 24 Pages  
  Keywords Human health; cancer; cell cycle; circadian rhythms; clock genes; light at night  
  Abstract For many individuals in industrialized nations, the widespread adoption of electric lighting has dramatically affected the circadian organization of physiology and behavior. Although initially assumed to be innocuous, exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) is associated with several disorders, including increased incidence of cancer, metabolic disorders, and mood disorders. Within this review, we present a brief overview of the molecular circadian clock system and the importance of maintaining fidelity to bright days and dark nights. We describe the interrelation between core clock genes and the cell cycle, as well as the contribution of clock genes to oncogenesis. Next, we review the clinical implications of disrupted circadian rhythms on cancer, followed by a section on the foundational science literature on the effects of light at night and cancer. Finally, we provide some strategies for mitigation of disrupted circadian rhythms to improve health.  
  Address West Virginia University Cancer Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA; William.Walker2 ( at ) hsc.wvu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:33302582; PMCID:PMC7764771 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3401  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kubistova, A.; Spisska, V.; Petrzelkova, L.; Hrubcova, L.; Moravcova, S.; Maierova, L.; Bendova, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Constant Light in Critical Postnatal Days Affects Circadian Rhythms in Locomotion and Gene Expression in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus, Retina, and Pineal Gland Later in Life Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Biomedicines Abbreviated Journal Biomedicines  
  Volume 8 Issue 12 Pages in press  
  Keywords Animals; circadian clock; light at night; pineal gland; rat; retina; suprachiasmatic nucleus  
  Abstract The circadian clock regulates bodily rhythms by time cues that result from the integration of genetically encoded endogenous rhythms with external cycles, most potently with the light/dark cycle. Chronic exposure to constant light in adulthood disrupts circadian system function and can induce behavioral and physiological arrhythmicity with potential clinical consequences. Since the developing nervous system is particularly vulnerable to experiences during the critical period, we hypothesized that early-life circadian disruption would negatively impact the development of the circadian clock and its adult function. Newborn rats were subjected to a constant light of 16 lux from the day of birth through until postnatal day 20, and then they were housed in conditions of L12 h (16 lux): D12 h (darkness). The circadian period was measured by locomotor activity rhythm at postnatal day 60, and the rhythmic expressions of clock genes and tissue-specific genes were detected in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, retinas, and pineal glands at postnatal days 30 and 90. Our data show that early postnatal exposure to constant light leads to a prolonged endogenous period of locomotor activity rhythm and affects the rhythmic gene expression in all studied brain structures later in life.  
  Address Department of Sleep Medicine and Chronobiology, National Institute of Mental Health, 250 67 Klecany, Czech Republic  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2227-9059 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:33297440; PMCID:PMC7762254 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3273  
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Author Zhang, S.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, Y.; Li, X.; Song, Y.; Yuan, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Rotating Night Shift Work, Exposure to Light at Night, and Glomerular Filtration Rate: Baseline Results from a Chinese Occupational Cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 23 Pages  
  Keywords Human health; Adult; Asian Continental Ancestry Group; China/epidemiology; Circadian Rhythm; Female; *Glomerular Filtration Rate; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Risk Factors; *Shift Work Schedule/adverse effects; Uric Acid; Work Schedule Tolerance; Young Adult; *light at night; *night shift work; *renal function  
  Abstract The misalignment between the circadian clock and behavioral cycles has been implicated in pathogenesis of many diseases. The main purpose of this study is to examine the association between rotating night shift work, exposure to light at night, and glomerular filtration rate among steelworkers in north China. A total of 6869 steelworkers, aged 22 to 60 years, were included in this study. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between night shift work, the brightness of bedroom ambient light at night (LAN), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), with adjustment for potential confounders. Mediation analysis was performed to examine the mediation effect of potential mediators on the association of duration of night shifts and eGFR. Long duration of night shift work (>/=29 years) had elevated odds of decreased eGFR (</=89 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) (odds ratio (OR), 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.73) compared with day work after adjustment for potential confounders. The association between duration of night shifts and eGFR (continuous) was partially modified by diastolic blood pressure (average causal mediation effect (ACME), -0.077, 95% CI -0.134 to -0.030, p < 0.001). No significant associations were observed among the different brightness of bedroom ambient light levels: middle level (OR, 0.90, 95% CI 0.77-1.05), lightest level (OR, 0.94, 95% CI 0.75-1.18), and decreased eGFR compared with the darkest level. Long-term night-shift work, rather than the brightness of bedroom ambient LAN, is associated with early stage of renal dysfunction in steelworkers, and blood pressure may mediate the relationship between night shift work and decreased eGFR.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan 063210, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:33291553; PMCID:PMC7730862 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3399  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wu, Y.; Gui, S.-Y.; Fang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Hu, C.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to outdoor light at night and risk of breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 269 Issue Pages 116114  
  Keywords Human health; *Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; *Light/adverse effects; Prospective Studies; Breast cancer; Light at night; Meta-analysis; Systematic review  
  Abstract Recent epidemiological studies have explored effects of light at night (LAN) exposure on breast cancer, but reported inconsistent findings. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of available evidence regarding the association of LAN assessed by satellite data with breast cancer. We conducted a systematic PubMed, Web of Science, and EMBASE database literature search until August 2020. Random-effects meta-analysis was applied to synthesis risk estimates. Heterogeneity was measured using statistics of Cochran's Q, I(2), and Tau(2) (tau(2)). We assessed publication bias through funnel plot and Egger's test. Moreover, subgroup analyses according to study design and menopausal status were performed. Risk of bias (RoB) of each included study was assessed using a domain-based RoB assessment tool. The confidence in the body of evidence was appraised using the GRADE approach for level-of-evidence translation. A total of 1157 studies were identified referring to LAN and breast cancer, from which 6 were included for quantitative synthesis. We found a significantly higher odds of breast cancer in the highest versus the lowest category of LAN exposure (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.16; I(2) = 0.0%). In the subgroup analyses stratified by menopausal status and study design, significant association was found in postmenopausal women (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.13) and cohort studies (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.18), while the summary estimates of premenopausal women and case-control studies showed no significance. The level of evidence for the association of LAN exposure and breast cancer risk was graded as “moderate” with “probably low” RoB according to the NTP/OHAT framework. In conclusion, this study suggests a link of LAN exposure with risk of breast cancer. Further high-quality prospective studies, especially performed in low-to middle-income countries with improvement in the area of LAN exposure assessment are needed to advance this field.  
  Address Department of Humanistic Medicine, School of Humanistic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, China; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, China. Electronic address: cy.hu@ahmu.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:33280921 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3384  
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Author Sun, S.; Cao, W.; Ge, Y.; Ran, J.; Sun, F.; Zeng, Q.; Guo, M.; Huang, J.; Lee, R.S.-Y.; Tian, L.; Wellenius, G.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light at night and risk of coronary heart disease among older adults: a prospective cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human health; Cohort study; Coronary heart disease; Hospitalization; Light at night; Mortality  
  Abstract AIMS: We estimated the association between outdoor light at night at the residence and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) within a prospective cohort of older adults in Hong Kong. METHODS AND RESULTS: Over a median of 11 years of follow-up, we identified 3772 incident CHD hospitalizations and 1695 CHD deaths. Annual levels of outdoor light at night at participants' residential addresses were estimated using time-varying satellite data for a composite of persistent night-time illumination at approximately 1 km2 scale. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the association between outdoor light at night at the residence and risk of CHD. The association between light at night and incident CHD hospitalization and mortality exhibited a monotonic exposure-response function. An interquartile range (IQR) (60.0 nW/cm2/sr) increase in outdoor light at night was associated with an HR of 1.11 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.18) for CHD hospitalizations and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.22) for CHD deaths after adjusting for both individual and area-level risk factors. The association did not vary across strata of hypothesized risk factors. CONCLUSION: Among older adults, outdoor light at night at the residence was associated with a higher risk of CHD hospitalizations and deaths. We caution against causal interpretation of these novel findings. Future studies with more detailed information on exposure, individual adaptive behaviours, and potential mediators are warranted to further examine the relationship between light at night and CHD risk.  
  Address Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, 715 Albany Street, Boston, MA 02118, USA; linweit ( at ) hku.hk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:33205210 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3396  
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