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Author Touitou, Y.; Reinberg, A.; Touitou, D.
Title Association between light at night, melatonin secretion, sleep deprivation, and the internal clock: Health impacts and mechanisms of circadian disruption Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci
Volume 173 Issue Pages 94-106
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Exposure to Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) results in a disruption of the circadian system, which is deleterious to health. In industrialized countries, 75% of the total workforce is estimated to have been involved in shift work and night work. Epidemiologic studies, mainly of nurses, have revealed an association between sustained night work and a 50-100% higher incidence of breast cancer. The potential and multifactorial mechanisms of the effects include the suppression of melatonin secretion by ALAN, sleep deprivation, and circadian disruption. Shift and/or night work generally decreases the time spent sleeping, and it disrupts the circadian time structure. In the long run, this desynchronization is detrimental to health, as underscored by a large number of epidemiological studies that have uncovered elevated rates of several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular risks, obesity, mood disorders and age-related macular degeneration. It amounts to a public health issue in the light of the very substantial number of individuals involved. The IARC has classified shift work in group 2A of “probable carcinogens to humans” since “they involve a circadian disorganization”. Countermeasures to the effects of ALAN, such as melatonin, bright light, or psychotropic drugs, have been proposed as a means to combat circadian clock disruption and improve adaptation to shift and night work. We review the evidence for the ALAN impacts on health. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding to combat the detrimental properties of exposure to ALAN and develop strategies of prevention.
Address UHSA – Groupe Hospitalier Paul Guiraud, 54, avenue de la Republique, 94806 Villejuif, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28214594 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2455
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Author Heo, J.-Y.; Kim, K.; Fava, M.; Mischoulon, D.; Papakostas, G.I.; Kim, M.-J.; Kim, D.J.; Chang, K.-A.J.; Oh, Y.; Yu, B.-H.; Jeon, H.J.
Title Effects of smartphone use with and without blue light at night in healthy adults: A randomized, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled comparison Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Psychiatric Research Abbreviated Journal J Psychiatr Res
Volume 87 Issue Pages 61-70
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Smartphones deliver light to users through Light Emitting Diode (LED) displays. Blue light is the most potent wavelength for sleep and mood. This study investigated the immediate effects of smartphone blue light LED on humans at night. We investigated changes in serum melatonin levels, cortisol levels, body temperature, and psychiatric measures with a randomized, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled design of two 3-day admissions. Each subject played smartphone games with either conventional LED or suppressed blue light from 7:30 to 10:00PM (150 min). Then, they were readmitted and conducted the same procedure with the other type of smartphone. Serum melatonin levels were measured in 60-min intervals before, during and after use of the smartphones. Serum cortisol levels and body temperature were monitored every 120 min. The Profile of Mood States (POMS), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), and auditory and visual Continuous Performance Tests (CPTs) were administered. Among the 22 participants who were each admitted twice, use of blue light smartphones was associated with significantly decreased sleepiness (Cohen's d = 0.49, Z = 43.50, p = 0.04) and confusion-bewilderment (Cohen's d = 0.53, Z = 39.00, p = 0.02), and increased commission error (Cohen's d = -0.59, t = -2.64, p = 0.02). Also, users of blue light smartphones experienced a longer time to reach dim light melatonin onset 50% (2.94 vs. 2.70 h) and had increases in body temperature, serum melatonin levels, and cortisol levels, although these changes were not statistically significant. Use of blue light LED smartphones at night may negatively influence sleep and commission errors, while it may not be enough to lead to significant changes in serum melatonin and cortisol levels.
Address Department of Psychiatry, Depression Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Depression Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; Department of Health Sciences & Technology, Department of Medical Device Management and Research, and Department of Clinical Research Design and Evaluation, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences & Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: jeonhj@skku.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-3956 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28017916 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2456
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Author Warrant, E.
Title Superior vision in nocturnal insects inspires new night vision technologies Type Newspaper Article
Year 2016 Publication SPIE Newsroom Abbreviated Journal SPIE Newsroom
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Vision; Animals; Instrumentation
Abstract Algorithms that dramatically improve the quality of video sequences captured in very dim light have been developed on the basis of the neural mechanisms in nocturnal insects with excellent visual capabilities.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1818-2259 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1418
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Author Brady, A.; Willis, B.; Harder, L.; Vizel, P.
Title Lunar Phase Modulates Circadian Gene Expression Cycles in the Broadcast Spawning Coral Acropora millepora Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Biological Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Biol Bullet
Volume 230 Issue 2 Pages 130-142
Keywords Animals; corals; Acropora millepora; lunar cycle; Circadian Rhythm; gene expression; moon
Abstract Many broadcast spawning corals in multiple reef regions release their gametes with incredible temporal precision just once per year, using the lunar cycle to set the night of spawning. Moonlight, rather than tides or other lunar-regulated processes, is thought to be the proximate factor responsible for linking the night of spawning to the phase of the Moon. We compared patterns of gene expression among colonies of the broadcast spawning coral Acropora millepora at different phases of the lunar cycle, and when they were maintained under one of three experimentally simulated lunar lighting treatments: i) lunar lighting conditions matching those on the reef, or lunar patterns mimicking either ii) constant full Moon conditions, or iii) constant new Moon conditions. Normal lunar illumination was found to shift both the level and timing of clock gene transcription cycles between new and full moons, with the peak hour of expression for a number of genes occurring earlier in the evening under a new Moon when compared to a full Moon. When the normal lunar cycle is replaced with nighttime patterns equivalent to either a full Moon or a new Moon every evening, the normal monthlong changes in the level of expression are destroyed for most genes. In combination, these results indicate that daily changes in moonlight that occur over the lunar cycle are essential for maintaining normal lunar periodicity of clock gene transcription, and this may play a role in regulating spawn timing. These data also show that low levels of light pollution may have an impact on coral biological clocks.
Address Department of Biological Science, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada; pvize(at)ucalgary.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Marine Biological Laboratory Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1476
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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.
Title Case study of “Walk”: a video installation integrated into the facade of a store in Zurich/CH Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Professional Lighting Design Abbreviated Journal Prof Lighting Des
Volume Issue 101 Pages 52-58
Keywords Lighting; planning; commentary
Abstract With the rapid development of solid state lighting technology and the availability of LED light sources, coupled with the benefits they offer such as energy efficiency, long lifespan and the fact that they can be controlled and programmed, we are now finding LEDs being more widely used for animated advertising. In spite of the pace at which SSL is developing, or perhaps because of this, there is a distinct lack of evaluation guidelines or recommendations for professional designers. It is therefore essential that more research is carried out on this issue on an international scale, and that experts in the field get their heads together in order to formulate some basic guidelines that can be applied in practice.
Address Faculty of Architecture & Design, Hochschule Wismar, Wismar, Germany; k.zielinska-dabkowska(at)hs-wismar.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Verlag Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1479
Permanent link to this record