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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M. url  openurl
  Title Urban Lighting Masterplan—Definitions, Methodologies and Collaboration Type Book Chapter
  Year 2019 Publication (down) Urban Lighting for People: Evidence—Based Lighting Design for the Built Environment Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 18–41  
  Keywords Planning  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher RIBA Publishing Place of Publication London, UK Editor Davoudian, N.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 9780367814588 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2934  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Massetti, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing the impact of street lighting on Platanus x acerifolia phenology Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (down) Urban Forestry & Urban Greening Abbreviated Journal Urban Forestry & Urban Greening  
  Volume 34 Issue Pages 71-77  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Autumn phenology is an important part of the tree growing season that is still poorly understood. In addition to the environmental factors that might affect its timing, there are artificial effects introduced by modern society that could interfere with it, such as the increasing use of artificial light to illuminate urban nights. This study investigates the relationship between outdoor public lighting and leaf senescence of Platanus x acerifolia that constitutes with more than 4000 individuals, and 6% of public greening in Florence, Italy. The difference in autumn phenology under two lighting conditions was assessed by analysing data collected in a real context, using a presence-absence protocol of green leaves on 283 trees during leaf fall season from 2014 to 2017. Trees were classified in two groups of different light exposure. In 2016-2017, data were also collected at Cascine park, the main green area within the city and darker than the monitored sites. According to the analysis, the percentage of trees with green leaves under luminaires was significantly higher than trees far from the luminaires, for all sites from mid-December to the end of January, and this effect was enhanced during 2016-2017 which was characterised by a colder winter. In the same year, the period of absence of green leaves at Cascine started at least 20 days earlier than the other sites. These findings should be taken into consideration by scientists because artificial light could affect autumn phenology and therefore the length of the vegetative season, and by urban greening and light managers during the design and management of public green spaces. Moreover, the presence-absence protocol proved to be suitable for collecting observations because it was easy to perform in a real context.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1618-8667 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1932  
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Author Morelli, F.; Mikula, P.; Benedetti, Y.; Bussière, R.; Tryjanowski, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cemeteries support avian diversity likewise urban parks in European cities: Assessing taxonomic, evolutionary and functional diversity Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (down) Urban Forestry & Urban Greening Abbreviated Journal Urban Forestry & Urban Greening  
  Volume 36 Issue Pages 90-99  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract The aim of this study was to explore different components of avian diversity in two types of urban green areas, parks and cemeteries, in four European countries in relation to environmental characteristics. We studied bird species richness, functional diversity and evolutionary distinctiveness in 79 parks and 90 cemeteries located in four European countries: the Czech Republic, France, Italy and Poland.

First, we found no significant differences between cemeteries and parks in bird diversity. However, in both parks and cemeteries, only: two community metrics were affected by different environmental characteristics, including local vegetation structure and presence of human-related structures. Species richness was positively correlated with tree coverage and site size, functional diversity was unrelated to any of the measured variables, while the mean evolutionary distinctiveness score was positively correlated with tree coverage and negatively associated with the coverage of flowerbeds and number of street lamps.

Our findings can be useful for urban planning: by increasing tree coverage and site size it is possible to increase both taxonomic richness and evolutionary uniqueness of bird communities. In both parks and cemeteries, the potential association between light pollution and bird species richness was negligible. We also identified some thresholds where bird diversity was higher. Bird species richness was maximized in parks/cemeteries larger than 1.4 ha, with grass coverage lower than 65%. The evolutionary uniqueness of bird communities was higher in areas with tree coverage higher than 45%. In conclusion, the findings of this study provide evidence that cemeteries work similarly than urban parks supporting avian diversity.
 
  Address  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1618-8667 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2141  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ciach, M., & Fröhlich, A. doi  openurl
  Title Ungulates in the city: light pollution and open habitats predict the probability of roe deer occurring in an urban environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (down) Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 513–523  
  Keywords Animals; ungulates; Poland; Europe; roe deer; Capreolus capreolus  
  Abstract Although large and medium-sized herbivorous mammals avoid urbanized areas, they have recently begun to colonize towns and cities. In general, ungulates continue to avoid the centres of urban areas, and utilize mainly their thinly built-up outskirts. While extension of urban development is preventing ungulates from penetrating the urban landscape, the influence of noise and light pollution on the occurrence of mammalian herbivores is still poorly understood. Hence, we investigated the hypothesis that habitat availability shapes the distribution of roe deer Capreolus capreolus and artificial lightening discourages them from penetrating the urban landscape. Roe deer was recorded on 37% of randomly selected sample plots (N = 60) located within the city of Kraków (S Poland). The occupied plots contained significantly more open habitats, woodland patches were larger in them, but proximity to rivers, and noise and light pollution were significantly lower. The logistic regression model revealed that an increasing area of open habitats was positively correlated with the probability of roe deer occurring. However, the artificial lighting at night was negatively correlated with the probability of the species occurring: the negative effect of light pollution was mitigated by the greater area of open habitats. Our study highlights the very considerable potential of light pollution as a predictor of the occurrence of large mammals in the urban landscape. We argue that urbanization and the related artificial lighting at night may be a factor preventing ungulates from penetrating potentially suitable habitats in urban areas.  
  Address Department of Forest Biodiversity, Institute of Forest Ecology and Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, University of Agriculture, Kraków, Poland; michal.ciach(at)ur.krakow.pl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2305  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ciach, M.; Fröhlich, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Habitat type, food resources, noise and light pollution explain the species composition, abundance and stability of a winter bird assemblage in an urban environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal Urban Ecosyst  
  Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 547-559  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract At present, urban areas cover almost 3% of the Earth’s terrestrial area, and this proportion is constantly increasing. Although urbanization leads to a decline in biodiversity, at the same time it creates extensive habitats that are exploited by an assemblage of organisms, including birds. The species composition and density of birds nesting in towns and cities are determined by the types of buildings, the structure and maturity of urban greenery, and habitat diversity. In contrast, the habitat traits shaping the community of birds wintering in urban areas are not known. The aim of this work was to assess the influence of habitat structure, food resources and the urban effects (pollution, noise, artificial light) on an assemblage of birds overwintering in an urban area. It was carried out in 2014 and 2015 in the city of Kraków (southern Poland), on 56 randomly chosen sample plots, in which the composition, density and interseasonal similarity of bird assemblage were assessed with line transect method. A total of 64 bird species (mean = 17.7 ± 4.9 SD species/plot) was recorded. The mean density was 89.6 ind./km ±63.3 SD. The most numerous species were Great Tit Parus major, Magpie Pica pica, Blackbird Turdus merula, Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus, Rook Corvus frugilegus, Fieldfare Turdus pilaris and House Sparrow Passer domesticus. Noise adversely affected species numbers and density, but artificial light acted positively on the density of birds and their interseasonal stability. The species richness and density of birds were also determined by the number of food sources available (e.g. bird-feeders). In addition, the greater the proportion of open areas, the fewer species were recorded. In contrast, the more urban greenery there was, the greater the density of the entire bird assemblage. Urban infrastructure (buildings, roads, refuse tips) had a positive effect on the interseasonal stabilization of the species composition of wintering birds. The results of this work indicate that the urban effect, i.e. noise and light pollution, apart from purely habitat factors, provide a good explanation for the species richness, density and stability of bird assemblage wintering in urban areas.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1083-8155 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2444  
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