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Author Squires, W.A.; Hanson, H.E.
Title The destruction of birds at the lighthouses on the coast of California Type Journal Article
Year 1918 Publication (down) The Condor Abbreviated Journal
Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 6-10
Keywords Animals
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2425
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Author Zhao, X.; Zhang M.; Che, X.; Zou, F.
Title Blue light attracts nocturnally migrating birds Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (down) The Condor Abbreviated Journal
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution is increasing and artificial light sources have great impacts on animals. For migrating birds, collisions caused by artificial light pollution are a significant source of mortality. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that birds have different visual sensitivities to different colors of light, but few field experiments have compared birds’ responses to light of different wavelengths. We used 3 monochromatic lights (red, green, and blue) and polychromatic yellow light to study the impact of wavelength on phototaxis at 2 gathering sites of nocturnally migrating birds in Southwest China. For both sites, short-wavelength blue light caused the strongest phototactic response. In contrast, birds were rarely attracted to long-wavelength red light. The attractive effect of blue light was greatest during nights with fog and headwinds. As rapid urbanization and industrialization cause an increase in artificial light, we suggest that switching to longer wavelength lights is a convenient and economically effective way to reduce bird collisions.

摘要

目前地球上光污染日益严重,五颜六色的人工光源对生态系统造成了很大影响。就鸟类而言,在世界各地已发生了很多鸟类撞击人工光源的事件。实验室研究表明,鸟类对不同颜色的光有不同的视觉敏感度,但很少有野外实验比较鸟类对不同波长光的反应。我们在中国西南地区的两个夜间候鸟迁徙聚集点使用三种单色光(红、绿、蓝)和一种复合光(黄),研究了光波长对的候鸟趋光性的影响。研究表明,短波长的蓝光引起了候鸟最强烈的趋光性反应。相反,鸟类很少被长波长的红光所吸引。特别是在有雾和逆风的夜晚,蓝光的吸引力最大。由于快速的城市化和工业化导致人造光的增加,我们认为使用长波光是一个减少鸟类碰撞光源的方便和经济有效的方式。
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2896
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Author Kernbach, M. E., Cassone, V. M., Unnasch, T. R., & Martin, L. B.
Title Broad-spectrum light pollution suppresses melatonin and increases West Nile virus–induced mortality in House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (down) The Condor Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) has become a pervasive anthropogenic stressor for both humans and wildlife. Although many negative impacts of ALAN on human health have been identified, the consequences for infectious disease dynamics are largely unexplored. With the increase in popularity of energy efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs), the effects of spectral composition of ALAN have also come into question. Previous studies showed that exposure to low levels of incandescent ALAN extended the infectious period of House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) infected with West Nile virus (WNV) without affecting mortality rates, thus increasing the pathogen initial reproductive rate (R0) by ~41%. Here, we asked whether exposure to broad-spectrum (3000 K [Kelvin; unit of color temperature]) ALAN suppressed melatonin, a hormone implicated in ALAN-induced physiological consequences, in House Sparrows. We then asked whether amber-hue bulbs (1800 K) could ameliorate the effects of WNV on individual sparrows, and whether broad-spectrum or blue-rich bulbs (3000 K and 5000 K, respectively) could exacerbate them. We found that exposure to low intensity (~5 lux) broad-spectrum (3000 K) ALAN significantly suppressed melatonin levels throughout the night. Second, we found that exposure to broad-spectrum and blue-rich (3000 + 5000 K) lights did not affect WNV viremia but did increase WNV-induced mortality. Conversely, birds exposed to amber-hue (1800 K) ALAN had lower viremia and mortality rates similar to controls (i.e. natural light conditions). This study demonstrates that ALAN affects melatonin regulation in birds, but this effect, as well as ALAN influences on infectious disease responses, can be ameliorated by particular lighting technologies.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2967
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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.; Xavia, K.
Title An overview of the cognitive and biological effects of city nighttime illumination including a London case study Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (down) The Centre for Conscious Design Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting
Abstract Current scientific research demonstrates how critical the effects of city nighttime illumination are upon cognitive and biological health1 – which needs to be adequately acknowledged, understood and addressed by conscious cities and the plans they develop. Until recent decades, the design of nighttime lighting was determined mostly by electrical engineers who often applied technical standards to meet the requirements of vehicle-focused cities. Unfortunately, consideration of pedestrians and their visual needs to navigate throughout urbanscapes at night were ignored, and so too, was the impact that artificial lighting might have on them, and the environment. Today, the majority of urban city lighting has been installed without full awareness of its impact, and as a result, artificial light at night (ALAN) and light pollution have become an obvious public nuisance, a health risk and an environmental burden2,3. While poor lighting has its drawbacks, a lack of lighting can have many positive aspects, and urban settings can benefit from protecting, preserving and promoting natural darkness. We present two recent planning and design initiatives of London, in the UK, where the quality of light and value of darkness were not given the degree of attention and consideration they deserve. This paper has particular relevance for urban policy makers, city planners, architects, designers, consultants and researchers as it explores the various problems caused by the obvious lack of responsible nighttime illumination.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2296
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Author Entwistle, J.; Slater, D.
Title Making space for 'the social': connecting sociology and professional practices in urban lighting design Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (down) The British Journal of Sociology Abbreviated Journal Br J Sociol
Volume 70 Issue 5 Pages 2020-2041
Keywords Sociology; Society; Lighting
Abstract Lighting is increasingly recognized as a significant social intervention by both lighting professionals and academic social scientists. However, what counts as 'the social' is diverse and contested, with consequences for what kind of 'social' is performed or invented. Based on a long-term research programme, we argue that collaboration between sociologists and lighting professionals requires negotiating discourses and practices of 'the social'. This paper explores the quality and kinds of spaces made for 'the social' in professional practices and academic collaborations, focusing on two case studies of urban lighting that demonstrate how the space of 'the social' is constrained and impoverished by an institutionalized division between technical and aesthetic lighting. We consider the potential role of sociologists in making more productive spaces for 'the social' in urban design, as part of the central sociological task of 'inventing the social' (Marres, Guggenheim and Wilkie 2018) in the process of studying it.
Address Department of Sociology, London School of Economics; d.slater(at)lse.ac.uk
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Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-1315 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:30864152 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2265
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