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Author Albreiki, Mohammed S.
Title The effects of light at night and/or melatonin on hormones, metabo- lites, appetite control, vascular function, and behavioural responses. Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (down) University of Surrey Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Light at night (LAN) is a major factor in disruption of SCN function, including melatonin suppression. Melatonin has been linked to a variety of biological processes such as lipid and glucose metabolism, vascular parameters, appetite, and behaviour. However, few human studies have investigated the effect of LAN and suppressed melatonin prior to and after an evening meal. The current thesis aims to investigate the impact of light at night and/or mela- tonin on hormones, metabolites, appetite, vascular function, and behaviour prior to and after an evening test meal in healthy participants. The first study investigated the effect of dim or bright light conditions on hor- mones, metabolites, appetite, vascular function and behavioural responses. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were reduced, lipid profiles altered and salivary melatonin suppressed under bright light compared to dim light conditions. Subjec- tive mood was improved and appetite scores increased in bright light. No differences were seen in vascular parameters. Although clear differences were apparent it could not be determined whether the effects were due to the light at night, the absence of melatonin or a combination of the two. The second study involved three conditions with the administration of exogenous melatonin 90 mins before the evening test meal under bright and dim light conditions compared to bright light alone with the consequent melatonin suppression. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were reduced and lipid profile altered in bright light when melatonin was suppressed compared to the two conditions with exogenous melatonin. Mood was improved and appetite increased with lower leptin levels and elevated wrist temperature with bright light and suppressed melatonin. Statistical analysis showed that the major effects were due to melatonin. These studies demonstrate a possible role for melatonin in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism when eating late at night which may have implications for shift-workers.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1747
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Author Bryant, J.M.; Hake, H.G.
Title A decision support system for assessment of street lighting tenders based on energy performance indicators and environmental criteria: Overview, methodology and case study Type Journal Article
Year 1911 Publication (down) University of Illinois Bulletin Abbreviated Journal
Volume 9 Issue 8 Pages Bulletin No. 51
Keywords Lighting; Energy; Economics; Planning
Abstract It is the purpose of this bulletin to make available information concerning street illumination. The suggestion which led to this compilation came from the many inquiries received by the Electrical Engineering Department each year from those interested in framing ordinances permitting corporations or individuals to operate street lighting systems. An attempt has been made to present this information in such a form as to be readily understood by the general public, without requiring any special technical knowledge. The data have been compiled from reliable sources, and checked in many instances by tests conducted by the writers.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, College of Engineering Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2739
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Author Nang, E.E.K.; Abuduxike, G.; Posadzki, P.; Divakar, U.; Visvalingam, N.; Nazeha, N.; Dunleavy, G.; Christopoulos, G.I.; Soh, C.-K.; Jarbrink, K.; Soljak, M.; Car, J.
Title Review of the potential health effects of light and environmental exposures in underground workplaces Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (down) Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology Abbreviated Journal Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology
Volume 84 Issue Pages 201-209
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Underground workplaces are an important element in modern urban planning. As a result, an increasing but unquantified proportion of the population is being regularly exposed to them. We narratively reviewed the literature on the range of possible environmental exposures, and the possible health effects, to identify future research directions. There is a large but mainly observational research literature on likely underground exposures, including effects of artificial lighting, shift working and light at night on circadian disruptions and associated health effects. There are five studies comparing underground and aboveground environments. Shift working, artificial lighting and poor sleep quality leading to circadian disruption is one physiologic pathway. Working underground may increase exposure to these risks, and may also be associated with vitamin D deficiency, sick building syndrome, excessive noise, radon exposure, and negative psychological effects. In order to plan appropriate interventions, we need to expand our knowledge of the health effects of underground environments. Larger and longer-term studies are required to measure a range of human factors, environmental exposures and confounders. Controlled trials with health economic analyses of new lighting technologies are also required.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0886-7798 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2112
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Author Chen, S.; Li, W.; Yang, S.; Zhang, B.; Li, T.; Du, Y.; Yang, M.; Zhao, H.
Title Evaluation method and reduction measures for the flicker effect in road lighting using fixed Low Mounting Height Luminaires Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (down) Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology Abbreviated Journal Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology
Volume 93 Issue Pages 103101
Keywords Lighting; Vision
Abstract Low Mounting Height Luminaires (LMHL) are used in many cities on viaducts, cross-sea and cross-river bridges due to their unique advantages. However, the flicker effect is an important factor that needs to be considered in road lighting using fixed LMHL. At present, there are not many researchers in the field of international lighting. Previous types of road lighting design were based on the method of the tunnel lighting flicker effect. At the same time, the flicker effect is mainly based on the subjective feelings of people but is not quantified. In this paper, the Flicker Index (FI) is calculated by measuring the parameters of streetlamps to evaluation flicker effect. Secondly, the suggestion to offset the flicker effect in CIE 88-2004 “Guide for the Lighting of Road Tunnels and Underpasses” is to limit the speed of the vehicle and adjust the road light spacing to avoid the flicker sensitive area on human eyes, while ignoring the essential problem of how the flicker effect is generated through the energy level of the stimulating optical signal. Two factors affecting the strength of the flicker effect are proposed: energy ratio and duty cycle. The duty cycle, in time, refers to the proportion of the strong and weak flashing signals during the period; in space, it refers to the proportional relationship between the length of the luminaire and the distance between the lamps, which is related to the running speed of the vehicle. It is consistent with the CIE recommendations for flicker. Thirdly, the essence of the flicker effect is the problem of the energy level of the stimulus signal. This study investigated the reduction in the brightness of the light source, hence reducing the energy of the visual stimulation signal to the human eye in order to judge the degree of fatigue in human vision. The experimental results show that the degree of fatigue in human vision decreases when the brightness of the experimental light source decreases. Therefore, the key to changing the flicker effect of LMHL is to reduce the contrast between the surface brightness of the luminaire and the brightness of the spatial background.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0886-7798 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2663
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Author Brelsford, CC; Robson, TM
Title Blue light advances bud burst in branches of three deciduous tree species under short-day conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (down) Trees Abbreviated Journal
Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 1157-1164
Keywords Plants
Abstract During spring, utilising multiple cues allow tree species from temperate and boreal regions to coordinate their bud burst and leaf out, at the right moment to capitalise on favourable conditions for photosynthesis. Whilst the effect of blue light (400–500 nm) has been shown to increase percentage bud burst of axillary shoots of Rosa sp., the effects of blue light on spring-time bud burst of deciduous tree species have not previously been reported. We tested the hypotheses that blue light would advance spring bud burst in tree species, and that late-successional species would respond more than early-successional species, whose bud burst is primarily determined by temperature. The bud development of Alnus glutinosa, Betula pendula, and Quercus robur branches, cut from dormant trees, was monitored under two light treatments of equal photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400–700 nm) and temperature, either with or without blue light, under controlled environmental conditions. In the presence of blue light, the mean time required to reach 50% bud burst was reduced by 3.3 days in Betula pendula, 6 days in Alnus glutinosa, and 6.3 days in Quercus robur. This result highlights the potential of the blue region of the solar spectrum to be used as an extra cue that could help plants to regulate their spring phenology, alongside photoperiod and temperature. Understanding how plants combine photoreceptor-mediated cues with other environmental cues such as temperature to control phenology is essential if we are to accurately predict how tree species might respond to climate change.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1847
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