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Author Dias, K.S.; Dosso, E.S.; Hall, A.S.; Schuch, A.P.; Tozetti, A.M.
Title Ecological light pollution affects anuran calling season, daily calling period, and sensitivity to light in natural Brazilian wetlands Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (down) The Science of Nature Abbreviated Journal Sci Nat
Volume 106 Issue 7-8 Pages 46
Keywords Animals
Abstract Ecological light pollution alters an environment's light cycle, potentially affecting photoperiod-controlled behavior. Anurans, for example, generally breed nocturnally, and the influence of light pollution on their natural history may therefore be especially strong. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by measuring male calling behavior of anuran communities in natural wetlands in southern Brazil exposed or not exposed to street lights. We recorded seasonal and diel calling activity and calling response to a light pulse. The peak calling season differed between continuously lit and unlit locations with most species in illuminated wetlands shortening their calling season and calling earlier in the year. In unlit breeding sites, Boana pulchella, Pseudis minuta, and Pseudopaludicola falcipes confined their calling activity to well-defined hours of the night, but in continuously lit areas, these species called more continuously through the night. A 2-minute light pulse inhibited calling, but only in unlit wetlands. After a light pulse, frogs quickly resumed calling-suggesting acclimatization to brief artificial light exposure. Our field experiment presents a convincing example of ecological light pollution showing that artificial light alters the seasonal and diel calling time of some South American wetland anurans. It also documents their acclimatization to brief lighting when being continuously exposed to light.
Address Laboratorio de Ecologia de Vertebrados Terrestres, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos – UNISINOS, Campus Sao Leopoldo, Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, 93020-190, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-1042 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31280391 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2560
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Author Nelson, R.J.; Chbeir, S.
Title Dark matters: effects of light at night on metabolism Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (down) The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Nutr Soc
Volume 77 Issue 3 Pages 223-229
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Life on earth has evolved during the past several billion years under relatively bright days and dark night conditions. The wide-spread adoption of electric lights during the past century exposed animals, both human and non-human, to significant light at night for the first time in their evolutionary history. Endogenous circadian clocks depend on light to entrain to the external daily environment and seasonal rhythms depend on clear nightly melatonin signals to assess time of year. Thus, light at night can derange temporal adaptations. Indeed, disruption of naturally evolved light-dark cycles results in several physiological and behavioural changes with potentially serious implications for physiology, behaviour and mood. In this review, data from night-shift workers on their elevated risk for metabolic disorders, as well as data from animal studies will be discussed. Night-shift workers are predisposed to obesity and dysregulated metabolism that may result from disrupted circadian rhythms. Although studies in human subjects are correlative, animal studies have revealed several mechanisms through which light at night may exert its effects on metabolism by disrupting circadian rhythms that are associated with inflammation, both in the brain and in the periphery. Disruption of the typical timing of food intake is a key effect of light at night and subsequent metabolic dysregulation. Strategies to avoid the effects of light at night on body mass dysregulation should be pursued.
Address Department of Neuroscience,The Ohio State University,Columbus, OH 43210,USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0029-6651 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29747703 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1896
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Author Vaaja, M. T., Kurkela, M., Maksimainen, M., Virtanen, J., Kukko, A., Lehtola, V. V., Hyyppä, J., & Hyyppä, H.
Title MOBILE MAPPING OF NIGHT-TIME ROAD ENVIRONMENT LIGHTING CONDITIONS Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (down) The Photogrammetric Journal of Finland Abbreviated Journal
Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Lighting; Remote Sensing
Abstract The measurement of 3D geometry for road environments is one of the main applications of mobile mapping systems (MMS). We present mobile mapping applied to a night-time road environment. We integrate the measurement of luminances into a georeferenced 3D point cloud. The luminance measurement and the 3D point cloud acquired with an MMS are used in assessing road environment lighting conditions. Luminance (cd/m2) was measured with a luminance-calibrated panoramic camera system, and point cloud was produced by laser scanners. The relative orientation between the GNSS, IMU, camera, and laser scanner sensors was solved in order to

integrate the data sets into the same coordinate system. Hence, the georeferenced luminance values are transferable into geographic information systems (GIS). The method provides promising results for future road lighting assessment. In addition, this article demonstrates the night-time mobile mapping principle applied to a road section in Helsinki, Finland. Finally, we discuss the

future applications of mobile-mapped luminance point clouds.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2650
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Author Lazar, M.
Title Shedding Light on the Global Distribution of Economic Activity Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication (down) The Open Geography Journal Abbreviated Journal Togeogj
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 147-160
Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing
Abstract Collection of data on economic variables, especially sub-national income levels, is problematic, due to various shortcomings in the data collection process. Additionally, the informal economy is often excluded from official statistics. Nighttime lights satellite imagery and the LandScan population grid provide an alternative means for measuring economic activity. We have developed a model for creating a disaggregated map of estimated total (formal plus informal) economic activity for countries and states of the world. Regression models were developed to calibrate the sum of lights to official measures of economic activity at the sub-national level for China, India, Mexico, and the United States and at the national level for other countries of the world, and subsequently unique coefficients were derived. Multiplying the unique coefficients with the sum of lights provided estimates of total economic activity, which were spatially distributed to generate a spatially disaggregated 1 km2 map of total economic activity.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1874-9232 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2440
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Author Garstang, R.H.
Title Mount Wilson Observatory: The Sad Story of Light Pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication (down) The Observatory Abbreviated Journal
Volume 124 Issue Pages 14-21
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract The brightness of night sky at the Mount Wilson Observatory has been calculated for the years from 1900 to 2000. Data on the street lighting in Los Angeles City and estimates for light from residences, shops, and businesses have been used to calculate the per capita light-emission rates. These have been used in model brightness calculations with the populations of many cities in the Los Angeles Basin. The results show the relentless increase in night-sky brightness that is continuing at this time.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2538
Permanent link to this record