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Author Rodrí­guez, A.; Garcí­­a, D.; Rodrí­guez, B.; Cardona, E.; Parpal, L.; Pons, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial lights and seabirds: is light pollution a threat for the threatened Balearic petrels? Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication (down) The Wilson Journal of Ornithologynithology Abbreviated Journal J. of Ornith.  
  Volume 156 Issue 4 Pages 893-902  
  Keywords Animals; birds; shearwater; Balearic shearwater; Puffinus mauretanicus; Scopoli's shearwater; Calonectris diomedea; European storm-petrel; Hydrobates pelagicus; Balearic Islands; Mediterranean; light pollution; biology; ecology; conservation  
  Abstract Petrels are among the most threatened group of birds. On top of facing predation by introduced mammals and incidental bycatch, these seabirds have to deal with an emerging threat, light pollution, which is increasing globally. Fledglings are disoriented and attracted to artificial lights in their maiden night flights from their nests to the sea. Once grounded, they are exposed to multiple threats leading to high mortality. We report on numbers of three petrel species (Balearic shearwater Puffinus mauretanicus, Scopoli's shearwater Calonectris diomedea, and European storm-petrel Hydrobates pelagicus) rescued on the Balearic Islands, Mediterranean Sea, in the period 1999-2013. We assessed the proportion of grounded fledglings in the population and colonies impact based on radiance levels measured from a nocturnal satellite image. We also calculated the radius of light pollution impact. At least 304 fledgling birds were found stranded due to attraction to artificial lights, fatally affecting 8.5 % of them. The proportion of grounded fledglings ranged between 0.13 and 0.56 % of the fledglings produced annually. The body mass of Balearic and Scopoli's shearwater fledglings decreased with rescue date. Light-induced mortality increased during the fledging period for Scopoli's shearwaters. Birds were rescued at a mean distance of 4833 m from the nearest colony, and between 30 and 47 % of colonies were exposed to light-polluted areas. Although impact seems to be low for all species, urban development and, consequently, the increase in light pollution in the proximity of the colonies should be taken into account to reduce as much as possible this emerging source of mortality.  
  Address Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Estación Biológica de Doñana (CSIC), Avda. Américo Vespucio s/n, 41092, Seville, Spain; airamrguez@ebd.csic.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher English Place of Publication English Editor  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2193-7206 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1185  
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Author Cochran, W.W.; Graber, R.R. url  openurl
  Title Attraction of nocturnal migrants by lights on a television tower Type Journal Article
  Year 1958 Publication (down) The Wilson Bulletin Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 70 Issue 4 Pages 378-380  
  Keywords Animals; Birds  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2429  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Murphy, B.A.; O’Brien, C.; Elliott, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Red light at night permits the nocturnal rise of melatonin production in horses Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (down) The Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal The Veterinary Journal  
  Volume 252 Issue Pages 105360  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Exposure to white light at night suppresses melatonin production, impacts circadian rhythms and contributes to ill-health in humans. Human interaction with horses frequently occurs at night. We tested the hypothesis that dim red light would not suppress the nightly rise in serum melatonin levels in horses. In a crossover design, six horses were maintained for consecutive 48 h periods under a Light:Red (LR) and a Light:Dark (LD) photo-schedule. Transitions from light (>200 lux, polychromatic white light) to red (5 lux, peak wavelength 625 nm) or dark (<0.5 lux), and vice versa, coincided with ambient sunset and sunrise times. Blood was collected at 2 h intervals for 24 h during each treatment via indwelling jugular catheters. Samples were harvested for serum and stored at −20 °C until assayed for melatonin by radioimmunoassay. Repeated measures two-way ANOVA and t-tests analysed for differences in LR and LD melatonin profiles and their circadian rhythm parameters.

No time x treatment interaction or effect of treatment on serum melatonin levels were demonstrated (P > 0.05). A robust main effect of time (P<0.0001) predominated, with melatonin levels rising at night under both treatments. Statistically significant differences were not observed when LR and LD were compared for circadian rhythm measures of night time peak, area under the curve (AUC), or for times of onset (evening rise), offset (morning decline), or peak duration. Low intensity red light at night did not impact the pattern of melatonin secretion in this study and is, therefore, unlikely to impact the physiology of circadian or seasonal regulation.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1090-0233 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2656  
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Author Patrick, G.T.W. url  openurl
  Title The Psychology of Daylight Saving Type Journal Article
  Year 1919 Publication (down) The Scientific Monthly Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages 385-396  
  Keywords Commentary  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2411  
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Author Manriquez, P.H.; Jara, M.E.; Diaz, M.I.; Quijon, P.A.; Widdicombe, S.; Pulgar, J.; Manriquez, K.; Quintanilla-Ahumada, D.; Duarte, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light pollution influences behavioral and physiological traits in a keystone predator species, Concholepas concholepas Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (down) The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 661 Issue Pages 543-552  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) is an increasing global problem that, despite being widely recognized in terrestrial systems, has been studied much less in marine habitats. In this study we investigated the effect of ALAN on behavioral and physiological traits of Concholepas concholepas, an important keystone species of the south-eastern Pacific coast. We used juveniles collected in intertidal habitats that had not previously been exposed to ALAN. In the laboratory we exposed them to two treatments: darkness and white LED (Lighting Emitting Diodes) to test for the impacts of ALAN on prey-searching behavior, self-righting time and metabolism. In the field, the distribution of juveniles was observed during daylight-hours to determine whether C. concholepas preferred shaded or illuminated microhabitats. Moreover, we compared the abundance of juveniles collected during day- and night-time hours. The laboratory experiments demonstrated that juveniles of C. concholepas seek out and choose their prey more efficiently in darkened areas. White LED illuminated conditions increased righting times and metabolism. Field surveys indicated that, during daylight hours, juveniles were more abundant in shaded micro-habitats than in illuminated ones. However, during darkness hours, individuals were not seen to aggregate in any particular microhabitats. We conclude that the exposure to ALAN might disrupt important behavioral and physiological traits of small juveniles in this species which, as a mechanism to avoid visual predators, are mainly active at night. It follows that ALAN in coastal areas might modify the entire community structure of intertidal habitats by altering the behavior of this keystone species.  
  Address Departamento de Ecologia y Biodiversidad, Facultad de Ciencias de la Vida, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile  
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  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30682607 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2213  
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