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Author Höst, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Light on the Moults and Sequences of Plumage in the Willow Ptarmigan Type Journal Article
  Year 1942 Publication (down) The Auk Abbreviated Journal The Auk  
  Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages 388-403  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-8038 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2427  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Elvey, C.T.; Roach, F.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Photoelectric Study of the Light from the Night Sky Type Journal Article
  Year 1937 Publication (down) The Astrophysical Journal Abbreviated Journal ApJL  
  Volume 85 Issue Pages 213  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Sky Brightness  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-637X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2399  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Garstang, R.H. url  openurl
  Title Dust and Light Pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 1991 Publication (down) The Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 103 Issue Pages 1109-1116  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract We have refined our model for the prediction ofthe brightness ofthe night sky due to man-made light pollution by the addition of an ozone layer, by the use ofa more accurate representation ofthe atmospheric molecular density variation as a function ofheight, and by using a better mathematical representation ofthe scattering angular function of aerosols. Each ofthese modifications leads to a small reduction in the predicted brightness ofthe night sky. We have also added to our model a thin layer ofdust ofarbitrary optical thickness and height above sea level. We have studied dust clouds at various heights and ofvarious optical thicknesses. Most ofour calculations have been performed for Kitt Peak National Observatory. Most calculations have used scattering and absorption coefficients appropriate for volcanic clouds; a few calculations refer to desert dust. Light pollution is reduced by a dust cloud ofmoderate density whose altitude is below about 10 km (for the V band) and increased for dust clouds at greater altitudes. Observations from good sites are not likely to be greatly affected by the increases in light pollution caused by volcanic clouds at altitudes oforder 20 km.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2523  
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Author Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nighttime Ecology: The “Nocturnal Problem” Revisited Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (down) The American Naturalist Abbreviated Journal The American Naturalist  
  Volume 193 Issue 4 Pages 481-502  
  Keywords Ecology; activity; diel; ecosystems; macroecology; nighttime; nocturnal; time partitioning  
  Abstract The existence of a synthetic program of research on what was then termed the “nocturnal problem” and that we might now call “nighttime ecology” was declared more than 70 years ago. In reality, this failed to materialize, arguably as a consequence of practical challenges in studying organisms at night and instead concentrating on the existence of circadian rhythms, the mechanisms that give rise to them, and their consequences. This legacy is evident to this day, with consideration of the ecology of the nighttime markedly underrepresented in ecological research and literature. However, several factors suggest that it would be timely to revive the vision of a comprehensive research program in nighttime ecology. These include (i) that the study of the ecology of the night is being revolutionized by new and improved technologies; (ii) suggestions that, far from being a minor component of biodiversity, a high proportion of animal species are active at night; (iii) that fundamental questions about differences and connections between the ecology of the daytime and the nighttime remain largely unanswered; and (iv) that the nighttime environment is coming under severe anthropogenic pressure. In this article, I seek to reestablish nighttime ecology as a synthetic program of research, highlighting key focal topics and questions and providing an overview of the current state of understanding and developments.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, United Kingdom; and Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, Institute for Advanced Study, Wallotstrasse 19, 14193 Berlin, Germany; k.j.gaston(at)exeter.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher University of Chicago Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-0147 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2254  
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Author Henderson, J.V.; Storeygard, A.; Weil, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Bright Idea for Measuring Economic Growth Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication (down) The American Economic Review Abbreviated Journal Am Econ Rev  
  Volume 101 Issue 3 Pages 194-199  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The quantity of human-generated light visible from outer space reflects variation in both population density and income per capita. In this paper we explore the usefulness of the change in visible light as a measure of GDP growth. We discuss the data, and then present a statistical framework that uses lights growth to augment existing income growth measures, assuming that measurement errors in the two series are uncorrelated. For some countries with very poor income measurement, we significantly revise estimates of growth. Our technique also produces growth estimates for cities or regions where no other data are available.  
  Address Brown University and NBER  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-8282 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25076786; PMCID:PMC4112959 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2767  
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