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Author Yue, J.; Perwitasari, S.; Xu, S.; Hozumi, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Sakanoi, T.; Saito, A.; Miller, S.D.; Straka, W.; Rong, P.
Title Preliminary Dual-Satellite Observations of Atmospheric Gravity Waves in Airglow Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Atmosphere Abbreviated Journal Atmosphere
Volume 10 Issue 11 Pages 650
Keywords Remote sensing; airglow
Abstract Atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) are among the important energy and momentum transfer mechanisms from the troposphere to the middle and upper atmosphere. Despite their understood importance in governing the structure and dynamics of these regions, mesospheric AGWs remain poorly measured globally, and largely unconstrained in numerical models. Since late 2011, the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day–night band (DNB) has observed global AGWs near the mesopause by virtue of its sensitivity to weak emissions of the OH* Meinel bands. The wave features, detectable at 0.75 km spatial resolution across its 3000 km imagery swath, are often confused by the upwelling emission of city lights and clouds reflecting downwelling nightglow. The Ionosphere, Mesosphere, upper Atmosphere and Plasmasphere (IMAP)/ Visible and near-Infrared Spectral Imager (VISI) O2 band, an independent measure of the AGW structures in nightglow based on the International Space Station (ISS) during 2012–2015, contains much less noise from the lower atmosphere. However, VISI offers much coarser resolution of 14–16 km and a narrower swath width of 600 km. Here, we present preliminary results of comparisons between VIIRS/DNB and VISI observations of AGWs, focusing on several concentric AGW events excited by the thunderstorms over Eastern Asia in August 2013. The comparisons point toward suggested improvements for future spaceborne airglow sensor designs targeting AGWs.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2073-4433 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3347
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Author Umar, M.; Atif, S.; Hildebrandt, M.L.; Tahir, A.; Azmat, M.; Zeeshan, M.
Title Trends of Aerosol Optical Thickness Using VIIRS S-NPP During Fog Episodes in Pakistan and India Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication (up) Atmosphere Abbreviated Journal Atmosphere
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 242
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) is one of the important parameters for assessing regional and global level of climate change. Fog episodes have considerably increased in south Asia because of environmental factors, and the burning of agricultural residue leads to major social and economic problems. In present study, Mann-Kendall trend analysis of AOT and active fire events was done, and their significance were assessed using long-term (October 2012–February 2020) remote sensing data derived smog maps. Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite National Polar Partnership (VIIRS N-PP) was used to map AOT episodes over the northern region of Pakistan and India. Results reveal that AOT displays a significantly decreasing trend over the northern and eastern region of Pakistan and a similar decreasing trend from the Western to Eastern region of India. Furthermore, active fire events have a significantly increasing trend at the Northern region of Pakistan. However, fire events have a significantly decreasing trend over the southern and southeastern region of India. Additionally, statistically significant decreasing trends were observed for AOT over Chakwal (p-value = 0.2, ZMK = −2.3) and Patiala (p-value = 0.15, ZMK = −3.2). Fire events have a significantly increasing trend for Dera Ismail Khan (p-value = 0.01, ZMK = 1.9), Jhang (p-value = 0.01, ZMK = 1.9), and Chakwal (p-value = 0.01, ZMK = 1.8), while they are significantly decreasing trend near New Delhi (p-value = 0.2, ZMK = −0.9), Aligarh (p-value = 0.15, ZMK = −0.9) and Patiala (p-value = 0.2, ZMK = −0.8).
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2073-4433 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3361
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Author Long, X.; Tie, X.; Zhou, J.; Dai, W.; Li, X.; Feng, T.; Li, G.; Cao, J.; An, Z.
Title Impact of the Green Light Program on haze in the North China Plain, China Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Abbreviated Journal Atmos. Chem. Phys.
Volume 19 Issue 17 Pages 11185-11197
Keywords Economics; Lighting; Planning
Abstract As the world's largest developing country, China has undergone ever-increasing demand for electricity during the past few decades. In 1996, China launched the Green Light Program (GLP), which became a national energy conservation activity for saving lighting electricity as well as an effective reduction of the coal consumption for power generation. Despite the great success of the GLP, its effects on haze have not been investigated and well understood. This study focused on assessing the potential coal saving induced by the improvement of luminous efficacy, the core of the GLP, and on estimating the consequent effects on the haze in the North China Plain (NCP), where a large number of power plants are located and are often engulfed by severe haze. The estimated potential coal saving induced by the GLP can reach a massive value of 120–323 million tons, accounting for 6.7 %–18.0 % of the total coal consumption for thermal power generation in China. There was a massive potential emission reduction of air pollutants from thermal power generation in the NCP, which was estimated to be 20.0–53.8 Gg for NOx and 6.9–18.7 Gg for SO2 in December 2015. The potential emission reduction induced by the GLP plays important roles in the haze formation, because the NOx and SO2 are important precursors for the formation of particles. To assess the impact of the GLP on haze, sensitivity studies were conducted by applying a regional chemical–dynamical model (WRF-CHEM). The model results suggest that in the case of lower-limit emission reduction, the PM2.5 concentration decreased by 2–5 µg m−3 in large areas of the NCP. In the case of upper-limit emission reduction, there was much more remarkable decrease in PM2.5 concentration (4–10 µg m−3). This study is a good example to illustrate that scientific innovation can induce important benefits for environment issues such as haze.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1680-7324 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2671
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Author Fu, D.; Xia, X.; Duan, M.; Zhang, X.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Liu, J.
Title Mapping nighttime PM 2.5 from VIIRS DNB using a linear mixed-effect model Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Atmospheric Environment Abbreviated Journal Atmospheric Environment
Volume 178 Issue Pages 214-222
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Estimation of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) from daytime satellite aerosol products is widely reported in the literature; however, remote sensing of nighttime surface PM2.5 from space is very limited. PM2.5 shows a distinct diurnal cycle and PM2.5 concentration at 1:00 local standard time (LST) has a linear correlation coefficient (R) of 0.80 with daily-mean PM2.5. Therefore, estimation of nighttime PM2.5 is required toward an improved understanding of temporal variation of PM2.5 and its effects on air quality. Using data from the Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and hourly PM2.5 data at 35 stations in Beijing, a mixed-effect model is developed here to estimate nighttime PM2.5 from nighttime light radiance measurements based on the assumption that the DNB-PM2.5 relationship is constant spatially but varies temporally. Cross-validation showed that the model developed using all stations predict daily PM2.5 with mean determination coefficient (R2) of 0.87 ±± 0.12, 0.83 ±0.10±0.10, 0.87 ±± 0.09, 0.83 ±± 0.10 in spring, summer, autumn and winter. Further analysis showed that the best model performance was achieved in urban stations with average cross-validation R2 of 0.92. In rural stations, DNB light signal is weak and was likely smeared by lunar illuminance that resulted in relatively poor estimation of PM2.5. The fixed and random parameters of the mixed-effect model in urban stations differed from those in suburban stations, which indicated that the assumption of the mixed-effect model should be carefully evaluated when used at a regional scale.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1352-2310 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1814
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Author Doumbia, E.H.T.; Liousse, C.; Keita, S.; Granier, L.; Granier, C.; Elvidge, C.D.; Elguindi, N.; Law, K.
Title Flaring emissions in Africa: Distribution, evolution and comparison with current inventories Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Atmospheric Environment Abbreviated Journal Atmospheric Environment
Volume 199 Issue Pages 423-434
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Flaring emissions are a major concern due to large uncertainties in the amount of chemical compounds released into the atmosphere and their evolution with time. A methodology based on DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) nighttime light data combined with regional gas flaring volumes from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Centers for Environmental Information (NOAA-NCEI) has been developed to estimate flaring emissions. This method is validated in Nigeria where individual field company data are available. The spatial distribution of CO2, CH4, NMVOCs, CO, OC, BC, SO2 and NOx is derived for the African continent for the period 1995–2010.

A range of the emissions due to flaring is estimated based on the range of emission factors (EFs) for each chemical species. An average decrease in CO2 emissions of about 30% is found over Africa from 1995 to 2010, with Nigeria being the largest contributor to this reduction (up to 50%). Changes in the spatial distribution with time indicate local increases, particularly at offshore platforms, which are attributed to a lack of regulations as well as aging infrastructures in oil and gas fields.

Comparisons with current inventories reveal differences in the location and magnitude of point source emissions. For chemical compounds such as NMVOCs and CH4, the ECLIPSE and EDGAR country-level values are considerably higher than the highest flaring emission estimated in this study for 2005. For species such as CO, OC, BC, SO2 and NOx, the emissions provided by the ECLIPSE and EDGAR inventories are generally within the same order of magnitude as the average values found in this study, with the exception of OC, BC and SO2 in which EDGAR provides much lower emissions. These discrepancies are likely due to either differences in the methodologies used to estimate the emissions, in the values of the emission factors considered, or in the definition of flaring sector. Our current estimations suggest that BC, CH4 and CO2 flaring emissions in Africa account for 1–15% (on average 7%), 0.5–8% (on average 2%) and 8–13% (on average 11%) of African total anthropogenic emissions, respectively. The contribution of flaring to African anthropogenic emissions varies widely among countries. For example, in Nigeria the average emissions due to flaring are estimated to be as high as 18% for BC, 10% for CH4 and 50% for CO2, which is significantly greater than the continental average and highlights the importance of emissions in flaring areas.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1352-2310 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2176
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