|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Ali A.A.S., Zakaria S.A., Guan A.C.K., Shun C.J.
Title Lighting for Heritage Building: A Case Study of the Lighting Design Applied on St. George’s Church in George Town, Penang Island Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Awang M., Meor M Fared M. (eds) ICACE 2019. Lecture Notes in Civil Engineering Abbreviated Journal
Volume 59 Issue Pages 113-119
Keywords Lighting
Abstract Light is one of the critical aspects of architecture, yet it is one of the understated elements in our daily lives. Light has a significant spot to form events, activities, and memories. Scientific studies have shown that appropriate and proper lighting does not only affect human health but daily human moods as well. Nowadays, lighting fixtures play essential roles in architecture and markets. A proper lighting fixture helps to highlight the structure, textures, and form of the shape of a building. However, the designers tend to focus more on the art aesthetics rather than the conservation ethics, such as the colorful design and the attractive lighting fixtures on the building, while the prime concern should be on realizing the impact of the lighting fixture toward the environment. The objectives of this study are to highlight the issues of the lighting system of the heritage building and suggest some recommendations to meet the requirements for the heritage building for better lighting design. The data for this research was collected using the quantitative method. Thus, as a result, it is found out that lighting design highlights the historical building, and therefore, attracts tourists, which benefit the economy. However, improper lighting installation leads to a negative impact on the society and human health.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2950
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Firebaugh, A.; Haynes, K.J.
Title Light pollution may create demographic traps for nocturnal insects Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology
Volume 34 Issue Pages 118-125
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution impacts both intra- and inter-specific interactions, such as interactions between mates and predator–prey interactions. In mobile organisms attracted to artificial lights, the effect of light pollution on these interactions may be intensified. If organisms are repelled by artificial lights, effects of light pollution on intra- and inter-specific interactions may be diminished as organisms move away. However, organisms repelled by artificial lights would likely lose suitable habitat as light pollution expands. Thus, we investigated how light pollution affects both net attraction or repulsion of organisms and effects on intra- and inter-specific interactions. In manipulative field studies using fireflies, we found that Photuris versicolor and Photinus pyralis fireflies were lured to artificial (LED) light at night and that both species were less likely to engage in courtship dialogues (bioluminescent flashing) in light-polluted field plots. Light pollution also lowered the mating success of P. pyralis. P. versicolor is known to prey upon P. pyralis by mimicking the flash patterns of P. pyralis, but we did not find an effect of light pollution on Photuris–Photinus predator–prey interactions. Our study suggests, that for some nocturnal insects, light-polluted areas may act as demographic traps, i.e., areas where immigration exceeds emigration and inhibition of courtship dialogues and mating reduces reproduction. Examining multiple factors affecting population growth in concert is needed to understand and mitigate impacts of light pollution on wildlife.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1978
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bolliger, J.; Hennet, T.; Wermelinger, B.; Bösch, R.; Pazur, R.; Blum, S.; Haller, J.; Obrist, M.K.
Title Effects of traffic-regulated street lighting on nocturnal insect abundance and bat activity Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract New technological developments modulate the light levels of LED street luminaires according to traffic volumes: light levels are increased given traffic and reduced in its absence. Such dimming of street lights reduces the level of artificial light at night (ALAN) and may thus contribute to mitigate light pollution. To quantify the impact of traffic-driven dimming of street lights on nocturnal insect abundance and bat activity in comparison to full light (i.e., dimming functions of luminaires switched off), we mounted 20 insect flight-interception traps and ten batloggers on street light poles along two dimmable street light sections. Insect abundance and bat activity were measured alternately with one week of full street lighting followed by a week with light levels modulated by traffic volumes. In total, 16 dimmed and 16 full-light days were investigated. Overall, traffic-driven dimming reduced light levels by 35%. Weather conditions (warm, dry nights) were the main drivers of insect abundance and bat activity, but traffic-driven dimming resulted in lower numbers of insects caught and reduced bat activity. Among insect groups, Heteroptera benefited most from dimming. For bats, urban exploiters (Pipistrellus spp.) benefited from increased availability of prey at brightly lit street lights, while less frequent species (Myotis spp.) did not benefit from street lighting. We conclude that street light dimming technology may contribute to mitigate negative effects of ALAN on nocturnal organisms, although the measure may not be efficient enough to support light-sensitive and threatened species.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3027
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Villarroya-Villalba, L.; Casanelles-Abella, J.; Moretti, M.; Pinho, P.; Samson, R.; Van Mensel, A.; Chiron, F.; Zellweger, F.; Obrist, M.K.
Title Response of bats and nocturnal insects to urban green areas in Europe Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication (up) Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Remote sensing
Abstract Animal biodiversity in cities is generally expected to be uniformly reduced, but recent studies show that this is modulated by the composition and configuration of Urban Green Areas (UGAs). UGAs represent a heterogeneous network of vegetated spaces in urban settings that have repeatedly shown to support a significant part of native diurnal animal biodiversity. However, nocturnal taxa have so far been understudied, constraining our understanding of the role of UGAs on maintaining ecological connectivity and enhancing overall biodiversity. We present a well-replicated multi-city study on the factors driving bat and nocturnal insect biodiversity in three European cities. To achieve this, we sampled bats with ultrasound recorders and flying insects with light traps during the summer of 2018. Results showed a greater abundance and diversity of bats and nocturnal insects in the city of Zurich, followed by Antwerp and Paris. We identified artificial lighting in the UGA to lower bat diversity by probably filtering out light-sensitive species. We also found a negative correlation between both bat activity and diversity and insect abundance, suggesting a top-down control. An in-depth analysis of the Zurich data revealed divergent responses of the nocturnal fauna to landscape variables, while pointing out a bottom-up control of insect diversity on bats. Thus, to effectively preserve biodiversity in urban environments, UGAs management decisions should take into account the combined ecological needs of bats and nocturnal insects and consider the specific spatial topology of UGAs in each city.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3294
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Girard, M.B.; Kasumovic, M.M.; Elias, D.O.
Title The role of red coloration and song in peacock spider courtship: insights into complex signaling systems Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Research on animal signaling enhances our understanding of links between sensory processing, decision making, behavior, and evolution. Studies of sexually-selected signals may be particularly informative as mate choice provides access to decision patterns in the way that courtship leads to an easily observable behavioral output in choosers, i.e., mating. Male peacock spiders have some of the most elaborate and varied courtship displays known among animals. Particularly striking to human observers is the diversity of red, orange, and yellow ornaments that males exhibit across the genus. The primary objective of our research was to investigate how these visual ornaments interact with vibratory songs to affect female mating behavior of one species, Maratus volans. Accordingly, we conducted mating trials under a series of experimentally manipulated vibratory and lighting conditions. Contrary to expectation, chromatic characteristics of longer wavelength ornaments are not driving female mate choice decisions, despite their extensive presence on male fans. Instead, our results suggest that contrast is important to females. Additionally, we found that vibratory signals were not necessary and did not increase mating rates. Our study demonstrates the intricacies inherent in complex signaling systems.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2027
Permanent link to this record