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Author Wuchterl, G.; Reithofer, M.
Title Licht über Wien VI Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Im Zentrum Wiens sättigt die Erhellung der Nacht, am Stadtrand sinken die jährlichen Zuwächse, wäh-rend im Abstand von 36 Kilometern (Großmugl) die Nächte um 10 % pro Jahr heller werden.Der Gesamtaufwand der Wiener Lichtglocke liegt 2018 bei 37 MW. Der Verlauf von 2011 bis 2018 zeigt ein deutliches Lichtmaximum um 2014 und 2015. Danach stellen wir einen allmählichen Rückgang fest.Der Verlauf der Lichtglocke und noch deutlicher jener der Einzelstationen zeigt signifikante Schwankun-gen von Jahr zu Jahr. Zur Aufklärung der Ursachen, die weder astronomisch noch meteorologisch sind, wur-den monatliche Analysen des Lichtmessnetzes mit Daten des Luftmessnetzes der Wiener MA 22 kombiniert. Die natürliche Variation über das Jahr wurde genutzt, um Zusammenhänge zwischen den Monatsmedianen von Luftfeuchtigkeit und Feinstaub mit jenen der Globalstrahlungsdaten zu suchen.Von 2016 bis 2018 korrelieren die Globalstrahlungswerte mit der relativen Luftfeuchtigkeit und den Feinstaubwerten (PM10 und PM2,5). Die engste Beziehung besteht auf der Kuffner-Sternwarte, wo eine Verdoppelung der Luftfeuchtigkeit statistisch von einer Verzehnfachung der Globalstrahlung begleitet wird. Die gefundenen Relationen sind über einen Faktor 100 in der Globalstrahlung äußerst robust und die Koeffizienten der Relationen sind an allen Stationen sehr homogen.Damit stehen gut bestimmte Zusammenhänge zwischen der Luftgüte und dem Zustand der klaren Atmo-sphäre zur Verfügung. Das wird es erlauben, Lichtmessnetze auf Standardatmosphären zu beziehen und damit eine wesentlich bessere Vergleichbarkeit der Daten zu unterschiedlichen Zeitpunkten herzustellen.- 130 Gigawattstunden Jahresaufwand für die Wiener Lichtglocke- 8 Jahre Vermessung der Lichtglocke zeigen Ansätze eines Rückgangs der Lichtflut- Mehr Feinstaub bewirkt überproportional mehr Lichtverschmutzung
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language German Summary Language Original Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2718
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Author Ringwald, R.; Rönitzsch, H.; Riedel, M.
Title Praxishandbuch Öffentliche Beleuchtung – Wirtschaftlichkeit, Recht, Technik Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication (up) 1. Aufl. DIN Deutsches Institut für Normung e.V., hrsg., Berlin Wien Zürich: Beuth Verlags GmbH. Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1058
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Author Pack, D. W., Coffman, C. M., & Santiago, J. R.
Title A Year in Space for the CUbesat MULtispectral Observing System: CUMULOS Type Conference Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) 33rd Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites Abbreviated Journal
Volume SSC19-XI-01 Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract CUMULOS is a three-camera system flying as a secondary payload on the Integrated Solar Array and Reflectarray Antenna (ISARA) mission with the goals of researching the use of uncooled commercial infrared cameras for Earth

remote sensing and demonstrating unique nighttime remote sensing capabilities. Three separate cameras comprise the CUMULOS payload: 1) a visible (VIS) Si CMOS camera, 2) a shortwave infrared (SWIR) InGaAs camera, and 3) a longwave infrared (LWIR) vanadium oxide microbolometer. This paper reviews on-orbit operations during the past year, in-space calibration observations and techniques, and Earth remote sensing highlights from the first year of space

operations. CUMULOS operations commenced on 8 June 2018 following the successful completion of the primary ISARA mission. Some of the unique contributions from the CUMULOS payloads include: 1) demonstrating the use of bright stars for on-orbit radiometric calibration of CubeSat payloads, 2) acquisition of science-quality nighttime lights data at 130-m resolution, and 3) operating the first simple Earth observing infrared payloads successfully flown on a CubeSat. Sample remote sensing results include images of: cities at night, ship lights (including fishing vessels), oil industry gas flares, serious wildfires, volcanic activity, and daytime and nighttime clouds. The CUMULOS VIS camera has measured calibrated nightlights imagery of major cities such as Los Angeles, Singapore, Shanghai, Tokyo, Kuwait City, Abu Dhabi, Jeddah, Istanbul, and London at more than 5x the resolution of VIIRS. The utility of these data for measuring light pollution, and mapping urban growth and infrastructure development at higher resolution than

VIIRS is being studied, with an emphasis placed on Los Angeles. The “Carr”, “Camp” and “Woolsey” fires from the 2018 California fire season were imaged with all three cameras and results highlight the excellent wildfire imaging

performance that can be achieved by small sensors. The SWIR camera has exhibited extreme sensitivity to flare and fire hotspots, and was even capable of detecting airglow-illuminated nighttime cloud structures by taking advantage of the strong OH emissions within its 0.9-1.7 micron bandpass. The LWIR microbolometer has proven successful at providing cloud context imagery for our nightlights mapping experiments, can detect very large fires and the brightest flare hotspots, and can also image terrain temperature variation and urban heat islands at 300-m resolution. CUMULOS capabilities show the potential of CubeSats and small sensors to perform several VIIRS-like nighttime mission areas in which wide area coverage can be traded for greater resolution over a smaller field of view. The sensor

has been used in collaboration with VIIRS researchers to explore these mission areas and side-by-side results will be presented illustrating the capabilities as well as the limitations of small aperture LEO CubeSat systems.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2736
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Author Sullivan, J.M.; Flannagan, M.J.
Title The role of ambient light level in fatal crashes: inferences from daylight saving time transitions Type Journal Article
Year 2002 Publication (up) Accident Analysis & Prevention Abbreviated Journal Accident Analysis & Prevention
Volume 34 Issue 4 Pages 487-498
Keywords Public Safety; Lighting
Abstract The purpose of this study was to estimate the size of the influence of ambient light level on fatal pedestrian and vehicle crashes in three scenarios. The scenarios were: fatal pedestrian crashes at intersections, fatal pedestrian crashes on dark rural roads, and fatal single-vehicle run-off-road crashes on dark, curved roads. Each scenario's sensitivity to light level was evaluated by comparing the number of fatal crashes across changes to and from daylight saving time, within daily time periods in which an abrupt change in light level occurs relative to official clock time. The analyses included 11 years of fatal crashes in the United States, between 1987 and 1997. Scenarios involving pedestrians were most sensitive to light level, in some cases showing up to seven times more risk at night over daytime. In contrast, single-vehicle run-off-road crashes showed little difference between light and dark time periods, suggesting factors other than light level play the dominant role in these crashes. These results are discussed in the context of the possible safety improvements offered by new developments in adaptive vehicle headlighting.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0001-4575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2126
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Author Wood, J.M.; Isoardi, G.; Black, A.; Cowling, I.
Title Night-time driving visibility associated with LED streetlight dimming Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Accident; Analysis and Prevention Abbreviated Journal Accid Anal Prev
Volume 121 Issue Pages 295-300
Keywords Public Safety
Abstract New LED streetlighting designs and dimming are being introduced worldwide, however, while their cost savings are well established, their impact on driving performance has received little attention. This study investigated the effect of streetlight dimming on night-time driving performance. Participants included 14 licensed drivers (mean age 34.2 +/- 4.9 years, range 27-40 years) who drove an instrumented vehicle around a closed circuit at night. Six LED streetlights were positioned along a 250 m, straight section and their light output varied between laps (dimming levels of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of maximum output; L25, L50, L75 and L100 respectively; at 100% average road surface luminance of 1.14 cd/m(2)). Driving tasks involved recognition distances and reaction times to a low contrast, moving target and a pedestrian walking at the roadside. Participants drove at an average driving speed of 55 km/hr in the streetlight zone. Streetlight dimming significantly delayed driver reaction times to the moving target (F3,13.06 = 6.404; p = 0.007); with an average 0.4 s delay in reaction times under L25 compared to L100, (estimated reduction in recognition distances of 6 m). Pedestrian recognition distances were significantly shorter under dimmed streetlight levels (F3,12.75 = 8.27; p = 0.003); average pedestrian recognition distances were 15 m shorter under L25 compared to L100, and 11 m shorter under L50 compared to L100. These data suggest that streetlight dimming impacts on driver visibility but it is unclear how these differences impact on safety; future studies are required to inform decisions on safe dimming levels for road networks.
Address School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0001-4575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30317014 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2160
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