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Author Stock, D.; Schernhammer, E.
Title Does night work affect age at which menopause occurs? Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Obesity Abbreviated Journal Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes
Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 306–312
Keywords Human Health; Review; shift work; Menopause; women
Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To delineate the current state of evidence on the impact of night shift work on age at natural menopause. RECENT FINDINGS: The only direct evidence is from a single observational study, which indicates that women who work night shifts are at moderately higher risk for earlier menopause and that this risk is more pronounced among younger women. Underlying biological mechanisms have yet to be sufficiently substantiated. A long-held line of inquiry, most strongly propagated by the observed link between night shift work and female breast cancer, is the 'Light at Night' hypothesis, which suggests melatonin-mediated circadian disruption as a potential regulator of reproductive signaling in women. Supporting evidence is found from observations of changes in endogenous melatonin production among night working women or in response to light exposure, and corresponding changes in endogenous ovarian hormone levels and modulated menstrual patterns, among other indications of altered central ovulation-governing processes. Susceptibility to night shift work may be modified by chronotype. SUMMARY: This review summarizes the literature related to night work and ovulatory regulation in humans, prioritizing population-based evidence to provide motivation for the study of circadian disruption and night shift work as a regulator of menopausal timing.
Address Department of Epidemiology, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1752-296X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31644468 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2708
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Author Henneken, J.; Jones, T.M.
Title Pheromones-based sexual selection in a rapidly changing world Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) Current Opinion in Insect Science Abbreviated Journal Current Opinion in Insect Science
Volume 24 Issue Pages 84-88
Keywords Animals
Abstract Insects utilise chemical cues for a range of different purposes and the complexity and degree of specificity of these signals is arguably unparalleled in the animal kingdom. Chemical signals are particularly important for insect reproduction and the selective pressures driving their evolution and maintenance have been the subject of previous reviews. However, the world in which chemical cues evolved and are maintained is changing at an unprecedented rate. How (or indeed whether) chemical signals used in sexual selection will respond is largely unknown. Here, we explore how recent increases in urbanisation and associated anthropogenic impacts may affect how chemical signals are produced and perceived. We focus on four anthropomorphic influences which have the potential to interact with pheromone-mediated sexual selection processes; climatic temperature shifts, exposure to chemical pollutants, the presence of artificial light at night and nutrient availability. Our aim is to provide a broad overview of key areas where the rapidly changing environment of the future might specifically affect pheromones utilised in sexual selection.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2214-5745 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1736
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Author Torres-Farfan, C.; Mendez, N.; Ehrefeld, P.; Seron-Ferre, M.
Title In utero circadian changes; facing light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Current Opinion in Physiology Abbreviated Journal Current Opinion in Physiology
Volume 13 Issue Pages 128-134
Keywords Human Health; Review; In Utero; Pregnancy; Circadian Rhythm
Abstract Regardless of the molecular and physiological mechanisms involved, maternal fetal circadian systems interactions are recognized as crucial crosstalk for fetal development, and in turn, it may be a key factor determining fitting health in adulthood. However, in the last 100 years, life on the planet has altered the natural light-dark cycle by increasing light at night inducing disorganization of the circadian system, i.e. chronodisruption, including perturbation of the melatonin circadian rhythm by decreasing its nocturnal peak. The reduction in melatonin is associated with gradual losses in antioxidant protection, immunological and anti-inflammatory effects and as stated by WHO, the lack of nocturnal peak of melatonin is a deleterious signal that may induce chronic disease and cancer. Collectively the current review provides evidence about the role played by maternal circadian rhythms in fetal development and the impact of fetal-maternal desynchronization in the health and diseases of the offspring.
Address Laboratory of Developmental Chronobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile; claudia.torres(at)uach.cl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsever Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2468-8673 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2761
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Author Tronin A. A.; Gornyy V. I.; Kritsuk S. G.; Latypov I. Sh.
Title Nighttime Lights As A Quantitative Indicator Of Anthropogenic Load On Ecosystems Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication (up) Current Problems In Remote Sensing Of The Earth From Space Abbreviated Journal
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 237 - 244
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Nighttime lights of the Earth’s surface are considered as integral and quantitative indicator of anthropogenic load on ecosystems in the framework of energetic approach for ecological safety level rating. Nighttime lights have high correlation with primary energy consumption at the regional level. Nighttime radiation recorded on satellite Suomi NPP (radiometer VIIRS) was recalculated to primary energy consumption. Photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by plants is determined from ecosystem primary production. EOS satellite system product MOD17 supplies global primary production information. Energetic approach is based on comparison of photosynthetically active radiation, absorbed by plants and anthropogenic energy load on ecosystems. Ecological safety level was calculated as the relation of photosynthetically active radiation to anthropogenic load on ecosystems. Ecological safety map for northwest part of European Russia was compiled with high spatial resolution on the basis of nighttime lights and ecosystem primary production satellite data. The highest level of ecological safety was defined for Karelia and Arkhangelsk region where anthropogenic load on ecosystems is relatively moderate and plants receive enough solar radiation to parry threats to ecosystem service. The very low ecological safety level was observed in St-Petersburg that is explained by high energy load and small area of urban agglomeration.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2070-7401 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3178
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Author Woods, H. C., & Scott, H.
Title Merging the Biological and Cognitive Processes of Sleep and Screens Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Current Sleep Medicine Reports Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 150-155
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Purpose of Review

Screens are a permanent feature of life today and we have reached an interesting juncture with different research agendas investigating the biological and cognitive aspects of screen use separately. This review argues that it is timely and indeed essential that we bring together these research areas to fully understand both positive and negative aspects of screen use.

Recent Findings

More recent work is starting to take a more cohesive approach to understanding how device use pre-bedtime can impact our sleep by including both light and content in their experimental protocols which is a welcome development leading to a more nuanced understanding of both biological and cognitive processes.

Summary

We call for an open and collaborative approach to gain momentum in this direction of acknowledging both biological and cognitive factors enabling us to understand the relative impacts of both whilst using screens with regard to both light and content.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2640
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