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Author Wood, J.M.; Isoardi, G.; Black, A.; Cowling, I.
Title Night-time driving visibility associated with LED streetlight dimming Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Accident; Analysis and Prevention Abbreviated Journal Accid Anal Prev
Volume 121 Issue Pages 295-300
Keywords Public Safety
Abstract New LED streetlighting designs and dimming are being introduced worldwide, however, while their cost savings are well established, their impact on driving performance has received little attention. This study investigated the effect of streetlight dimming on night-time driving performance. Participants included 14 licensed drivers (mean age 34.2 +/- 4.9 years, range 27-40 years) who drove an instrumented vehicle around a closed circuit at night. Six LED streetlights were positioned along a 250 m, straight section and their light output varied between laps (dimming levels of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of maximum output; L25, L50, L75 and L100 respectively; at 100% average road surface luminance of 1.14 cd/m(2)). Driving tasks involved recognition distances and reaction times to a low contrast, moving target and a pedestrian walking at the roadside. Participants drove at an average driving speed of 55 km/hr in the streetlight zone. Streetlight dimming significantly delayed driver reaction times to the moving target (F3,13.06 = 6.404; p = 0.007); with an average 0.4 s delay in reaction times under L25 compared to L100, (estimated reduction in recognition distances of 6 m). Pedestrian recognition distances were significantly shorter under dimmed streetlight levels (F3,12.75 = 8.27; p = 0.003); average pedestrian recognition distances were 15 m shorter under L25 compared to L100, and 11 m shorter under L50 compared to L100. These data suggest that streetlight dimming impacts on driver visibility but it is unclear how these differences impact on safety; future studies are required to inform decisions on safe dimming levels for road networks.
Address School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0001-4575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30317014 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2160
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Author Petrželková, K. J.; Downs, N. C.; Zukal, J.; Racey, P. A.
Title A comparison between emergence and return activity in pipistrelle bats Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication (up) Acta Chiropterologica Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 381-390
Keywords animals; fying mammals: animal behaviour
Abstract Bats may be vulnerable to predation during evening emergence and morning return to their roosts. Early emergence increases the risk of exposure to raptorial birds, but emerging late confers a risk of missing the dusk peak of aerial insects. Here, both emergence and return activity was studied in detail at the same roosts for the first time. We investigated six maternity colonies of pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus) in NE Scotland and recorded light levels and time of emergence and return of the bats with respect to sunset and sunrise on the same nights. Parameters of return activity generally occurred at lower light intensities than those of emergence. Therefore, the interval between dawn return and sunrise was generally longer than that between sunset and dusk emergence. Emergence and return were equal in duration. Bats clustered more on emergence in comparison with return during pregnancy and lactation, whereas during postlactation this trend was reversed.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher BioOne Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1598
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Author Strobl, E.
Title The Impact of Typhoons on Economic Activity in the Philippines: Evidence from Nightlight Intensity Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) ADB Economics Working Paper Series Abbreviated Journal
Volume 589 Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract We quantify the economic impact of typhoons in the Philippines. To this end we construct a panel data set of local economic activity derived from nightlight intensity satellite images and a cell level measure of typhoon damage constructed from storm track data, a wind field model, and a stylized damage function. Our econometric results reveal that there is a statistically and potentially economically significant, albeit short- lived, impact of typhoon destruction on local economic activity. Constructing risk profiles from a 60-year historical set of storms suggests that (near) future losses in economic activity for frequent (5-year return period) and rare (50-year return period) events are likely

to range from between 1.0% and 2.5%.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2641
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Author Chukwu A. T.; Samaila N.; Okrikata E.
Title Flight to Light Response of Red Pumpkin Beetle (Aulacophora africana Weise) to Differently Coloured Light-emitting Diode and Incandescent Bulb Lights Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Advanced Journal of Graduate Research Abbreviated Journal Adv. J. Grad. Res.
Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 64-69
Keywords Animals
Abstract Red pumpkin beetle (Aulacophora africana Weise) is an important defoliator and vector of pathogens to its numerous crop hosts. Control had largely been by synthetic insecticides with their attendant consequences on man and the environment thus necessitating scientific studies on environmental-friendly management strategies. The experiment was conducted in the Research Farm of Federal University Wukari in the month of May 2019 with the aim of evaluating the attractiveness of A. africana to Light-emitting diode (LED) and Incandescent Light bulb colours. Five colours (red, yellow, green, blue and white) were used for the study. Each colour light was properly projected on 2 metre vertical screen (made of white polyethene) placed one meter above the ground. A setup without bulb served as the control. The light traps were arranged in a completely randomized design (CRD) in 6 replicates and ran simultaneously for six hours (1800 to 2400hrs). The pumpkin beetles attracted were collected in tubs containing soapy water. A. africana collected were counted and recorded according to bulb type and colour. Samples were identified at the Insect Museum of Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. Among the Incandescent bulbs, White colour was most attractive to A. africana (4.30±0.38) while red attracted the least (0.71±0.01). Among LED bulbs, Blue was most attractive (3.99±1.01) while Red also attracted the least (0.78±0.03). Overall, LED attracted more pumpkin beetles than Incandescent bulb even though Student Newman Keul’s test indicates that the difference between them was due to random variation (p = 0.16). Correlation and regression analyses indicated increase in insect attraction with increased light intensity. The results, therefore, suggest that white Incandescent or blue LED bulb colours can be incorporated into insecticidal light traps to suppress their population/attract them away from host plants or fixed into ordinary light traps to harvest the insect for scientific studies.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis Bachelor's thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3144
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Author Priyatikanto, R.; Mayangsari, L.; Prihandoko, R.A.; Admiranto, A.G.
Title Classification of Continuous Sky Brightness Data Using Random Forest Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Advances in Astronomy Abbreviated Journal Advances in Astronomy
Volume 2020 Issue Pages 1-11
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Sky brightness measuring and monitoring are required to mitigate the negative effect of light pollution as a byproduct of modern civilization. Good handling of a pile of sky brightness data includes evaluation and classification of the data according to its quality and characteristics such that further analysis and inference can be conducted properly. This study aims to develop a classification model based on Random Forest algorithm and to evaluate its performance. Using sky brightness data from 1250 nights with minute temporal resolution acquired at eight different stations in Indonesia, datasets consisting of 15 features were created to train and test the model. Those features were extracted from the observation time, the global statistics of nightly sky brightness, or the light curve characteristics. Among those features, 10 are considered to be the most important for the classification task. The model was trained to classify the data into six classes (1: peculiar data, 2: overcast, 3: cloudy, 4: clear, 5: moonlit-cloudy, and 6: moonlit-clear) and then tested to achieve high accuracy (92%) and scores (F-score = 84% and G-mean = 84%). Some misclassifications exist, but the classification results are considerably good as indicated by posterior distributions of the sky brightness as a function of classes. Data classified as class-4 have sharp distribution with typical full width at half maximum of 1.5 mag/arcsec2, while distributions of class-2 and -3 are left skewed with the latter having lighter tail. Due to the moonlight, distributions of class-5 and -6 data are more smeared or have larger spread. These results demonstrate that the established classification model is reasonably good and consistent.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1687-7969 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2878
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