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Author Downey, J.W.
Title Determination of minimum light sense and retinal dark adaptation with presentation of a new type of photometer Type Journal Article
Year 1919 Publication (up) American Journal of Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 13-20
Keywords Vision; Instrumentation
Abstract This paper reviews the principal hypotheses with reference to light and dark adaptation, and suggests a practical photometer, using a radioactive substance as a standard of comparison. With three illustrations, and experimental findings with this instrument.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2418
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Author Christie, S.; Vincent, A.D.; Li, H.; Frisby, C.L.; Kentish, S.J.; O'Rielly, R.; Wittert, G.A.; Page, A.J.
Title A rotating light cycle promotes weight gain and hepatic lipid storage in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Processes involved in regulation of energy balance and intermediary metabolism are aligned to the light-dark cycle. Shift-work and high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity disrupt circadian rhythmicity and are associated with increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study aimed to determine the effect of simulating shift work on hepatic lipid accumulation in lean and HFD-mice. C57BL/6 mice fed a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or HFD for 4wks were further allocated to a normal light (NL)-cycle (lights on:0600-1800hr) or rotating light (RL)-cycle (3-days NL and 4-days reversed (lights on:1800-0600hr) repeated) for 8wks. Tissue was collected every 3hrs beginning at 0600hr. HFD-mice gained more weight than SLD-mice, and RL-mice gained more weight than NL-mice. SLD-NL and HFD-NL mice, but not RL-mice, were more active, had higher respiratory quotients and consumed/expended more energy during the dark phase compared to the light phase. Blood glucose and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were elevated in HFD and SLD-RL compared to SLD-NL mice. Hepatic glycogen was elevated in HFD compared to SLD-mice. Hepatic triglycerides were elevated in SLD-RL and HFD-mice compared to SLD-NL. Circadian rhythmicity of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACACA) mRNA was phase shifted in SLD-RL and HFD-NL and lost in HFD-RL mice. Hepatic ACACA protein was reduced in SLD-RL and HFD-mice compared to SLD-NL mice. Hepatic adipose triglyceride lipase was elevated in HFD-NL compared to SLD-NL but lower in RL-mice compared to NL-mice irrespective of diet. -Conclusion: A RL-cycle model of shift-work promotes weight gain and hepatic lipid storage even in lean conditions.
Address Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Australia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0193-1857 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:30188750 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2123
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Author Tuttle, B. T., Anderson, S. J., Sutton, P. C., Elvidge, C. D., & Baugh, K.
Title It Used To Be Dark Here Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication (up) American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal
Volume 3 Issue 11 Pages 287-297
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Nighttime satellite imagery from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) has a unique capability to observe nocturnal light emissions from sources including cities, wild fires, and gas flares. Data from the DMSP OLS is used in a wide range of studies including mapping urban areas, estimating informal economies, and estimations of population. Given the extensive and increasing list of applications a repeatable method for assessing geolocation accuracy would be beneficial. An array of portable lights was designed and taken to multiple field sites known to have no other light sources. The lights were operated during nighttime overpasses by the DMSP OLS and observed in the imagery. An assessment of the geolocation accuracy was performed by measuring the distance between the GPS measured location of the lights and the observed location in the imagery. A systematic shift was observed and the mean distance was measured at 2.9 km.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2520
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Author Thompson, E.K.; Cullinan, N.L.; Jones, T.M.; Hopkins, G.R.
Title Effects of artificial light at night and male calling on movement patterns and mate location in field crickets Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 158 Issue Pages 183-191
Keywords Animals
Abstract Anthropogenic factors, such as artificial light at night (ALAN), are increasingly linked to significant modifications in animal behaviours, such as foraging or migration. However, few studies have investigated directly whether the presence of ALAN affects the ability to find a mate (mate location). One direct effect of the presence of ALAN is that it can create a light barrier in an otherwise dark environment. This may have significant behavioural implications for nocturnally active species if it affects their ability to respond to potential mates. Our study, using the acoustically orienting Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, determined experimentally whether the presence of a fragmented light environment influenced movement patterns of virgin females and males. Moreover, given the importance of male song for reproductive outcomes in this species, we assessed simultaneously whether such behaviours were modified by the presence of a male attraction call. We found that while initiation of movement was slower in the presence of ALAN, the behavioural shifts associated with its presence were relatively small compared to the influence of a broadcast male attraction call. The response to the male attraction call was typically stronger for females than for males, but both males and females modified aspects of behaviour when it was present regardless of whether their immediate environment was fragmented by artificial light at night or not. Artificial light at night may alter subtle aspects of movement and mating behaviour in this species, but ultimately does not provide a barrier to movement or mate location.
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ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2752
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Author Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, B.; Curbelo, Á.J.; Pérez, A.; Marrero, S.; Negro, J.J.; Katzner, T.
Title Factors affecting mortality of shearwaters stranded by light pollution: Mortality of shearwaters attracted by light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (up) Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal Anim Conserv
Volume 15 Issue 5 Pages 519-526
Keywords Cory's shearwater; Calonectris diomedea; birds; petrels; collisions; animals
Abstract Every year and across the world, thousands of fledglings of different petrel species crash into human structures because they are disorientated by artificial lights during their first flights. As this phenomenon is rather predictable, rescue campaigns are organized to help birds to reach the ocean, but unfortunately, a low proportion gets hurt or dies. Despite the huge number of affected individuals, and the fact that the problem was detected a long time ago, little is known on this source of mortality. We have studied the factors (i.e. body condition, plumage development, fledging date and sex) influencing the mortality of Cory's Shearwater Calonectris diomedea fledglings stranded inland due to light pollution in Tenerife (Canary Islands) during two consecutive breeding seasons (2009 and 2010). Late fledglings showed lower values of a body condition index than early ones. No sex biases were detected, neither considering stranded birds overall, nor for recovery dates or in the body condition of rescued fledglings. Our results indicate that late birds stranded by lights showing abundant down are more susceptible to fatal collisions and that the lights do not selectively kill birds with lower body condition indices. An enhancement of veterinary care should be done during the last part of the fledging period when more fatal collisions occur, especially focused on fledglings with abundant down. More research to determine why some individuals end up disoriented around artificial lights and others do not is urgently needed to minimize or prevent fallouts.
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ISSN 1367-9430 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 55
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