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Author Wang, H.; Li, J.; Gao, M.; Chan, T.-C.; Gao, Z.; Zhang, M.; Li, Y.; Gu, Y.; Chen, A.; Yang, Y.; Ho, H.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spatiotemporal variability in long-term population exposure to PM2.5 and lung cancer mortality attributable to PM2.5 across the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region over 2010–2016: A multistage approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) Chemosphere Abbreviated Journal Chemosphere  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 127153  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The Yangtze River Delta region (YRD) is one of the most densely populated regions in the world, and is frequently influenced by fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Specifically, lung cancer mortality has been recognized as a major health burden associated with PM2.5. Therefore, this study developed a multistage approach 1) to first create dasymetric population data with moderate resolution (1 km) by using a random forest algorithm, brightness reflectance of nighttime light (NTL) images, a digital elevation model (DEM), and a MODIS-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and 2) to apply the improved population dataset with a MODIS-derived PM2.5 dataset to estimate the association between spatiotemporal variability of long-term population exposure to PM2.5 and lung cancer mortality attributable to PM2.5 across YRD during 2010–2016 for microscale planning. The created dasymetric population data derived from a coarse census unit (administrative unit) were fairly matched with census data at a fine spatial scale (street block), with R2 and RMSE of 0.64 and 27,874.5 persons, respectively. Furthermore, a significant urban-rural difference of population exposure was found. Additionally, population exposure in Shanghai was 2.9–8 times higher than the other major cities (7-year average: 192,000 μg·people/m3·km2). More importantly, the relative risks of lung cancer mortality in high-risk areas were 28%–33% higher than in low-risk areas. There were 12,574–14,504 total lung cancer deaths attributable to PM2.5, and lung cancer deaths in each square kilometer of urban areas were 7–13 times higher than for rural areas. These results indicate that moderate-resolution information can help us understand the spatiotemporal variability of population exposure and related health risk in a high-density environment.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0045-6535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2938  
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Author Wei, Y., Chen, Z., Xiu, C., Yu, B., & Liu, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Siting of Dark Sky Reserves in China Based on Multi-source Spatial Data and Multiple Criteria Evaluation Method Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Chinese Geographical Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-13  
  Keywords Conservation; Skyglow; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract With the rapid development of population and urbanization and the progress of lighting technology, the influence of artificial light sources has increased. In this context, the problem of light pollution has attracted wide attention. Previous studies have revealed that light pollution can affect biological living environments, human physical and mental health, astronomical observations and many other aspects. Therefore, organizations internationally have begun to advocate for measures to prevent light pollution, many of which are recognized by the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA). In addition to improving public awareness, legal protections, technical treatments and other means, the construction of Dark Sky Reserves (DSR) has proven to be an effective preventive measure. So far, as a pioneer practice in this field, the IDA has identified 11 DSRs worldwide. Based on the DA requirements for DSRs, this paper utilizes NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data and other multi-source spatial data to analyze possible DSR sites in China. The land of China was divided into more than ten thousand 30 km × 30 km fishnets, and constraint and suitable conditions were designated, respectively, as light and cloud conditions, and scale, traffic and attractiveness conditions. Using a multiple criteria evaluation, 1443 fishnets were finally selected as most suitable sites for the construction of DSRs. Results found that less than 25% of China is not subject to light pollution, and less than 13% is suitable for DSR construction, primarily in western and northern areas, including Tibet, Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu and Inner Mongolia.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2724  
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Author Lee, E.; Kim, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light and Life at Night as Circadian Rhythm Disruptors Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Chronobiology in Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 95-102  
  Keywords Review; Human Health  
  Abstract Light is an important entraining agent for endogenous circadian rhythms. Artificial light at night (ALAN) negatively influences the circadian system, inducing acute effects on sleep and cognition, as well as chronic endocrine-disrupting effects resulting in obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Although shift workers may be exposed to extreme ALAN, its impact on their health is obscured by factors such as daylight exposure, meal and sleep scheduling, and physical and social behavior. Studies have revealed a significant increase in breast cancer in high ALAN-polluted areas, although the correlation with outdoor or indoor lighting conditions is controversial. Increasing use of electronic devices makes it difficult to assess ALAN exposure in the general population. The development of surrogate markers and critical parameters is crucial for health study by ALAN exposure, and such markers should include risk factors related to ALAN exposure. The present review considers articles investigating the risk of ALAN for shift workers, the general population, and users of electronic devices, and addresses susceptibility factors, including age, sex, and chronotype. Shift workers may be regarded as an extreme ALAN-exposure group, but the growing use of electronic devices and lifestyle changes in the general population make difficult to differentiate ALAN risks to health.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2903  
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Author Madahi, P.-G.; Ivan, O.; Adriana, B.; Diana, O.; Carolina, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Constant light during lactation programs circadian and metabolic systems Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 35 Issue 8 Pages 1153-1167  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Exposure to light at night is a disruptive condition for the adult circadian system, leading to arrhythmicity in nocturnal rodents. Circadian disruption is a risk factor for developing physiological and behavioral alterations, including weight gain and metabolic disease. During early stages of development, the circadian system undergoes a critical period of adjustment, and it is especially vulnerable to altered lighting conditions that may program its function, leading to long-term effects. We hypothesized that during lactation a disrupted light-dark cycle due to light at night may disrupt the circadian system and in the long term induce metabolic disorders. Here we explored in pups, short- and long-term effects of constant light (LL) during lactation. In the short term, LL caused a loss of rhythmicity and a reduction in the immunopositive cells of VIP, AVP, and PER1 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In the short term, the affection on the circadian clock in the pups resulted in body weight gain, loss of daily rhythms in general activity, plasma glucose and triglycerides (TG). Importantly, the DD conditions during development also induced altered daily rhythms in general activity and in the SCN. Exposure to LD conditions after lactation did not restore rhythmicity in the SCN, and the number of immunopositve cells to VIP, AVP, and PER1 remained reduced. In the long term, daily rhythmicity in general activity was restored; however, daily rhythms in glucose and TG remained disrupted, and daily mean levels of TG were significantly increased. Present results point out the programming role played by the LD cycle during early development in the function of the circadian system and on metabolism. This study points out the risk represented by exposure to an altered light-dark cycle during early stages of development. ABBREVIATIONS: AVP: arginine vasopressin peptide; CRY: cryptochrome; DD: constant darkness; DM: dorsomedial; LD: light-dark cycle; LL: constant light; NICUs: neonatal intensive care units; P: postnatal days; PER: period; S.E.M.: standard error of the mean; SCN: suprachiasmatic nucleus; TG: triglycerides; VIP: vasointestinal peptide; VL: ventrolateral; ZT: zeitgeber time.  
  Address a Facultad de Medicina , Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM , Mexico City , Mexico  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29688088 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1884  
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Author Rybnikova, N.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Population-level study links short-wavelength nighttime illumination with breast cancer incidence in a major metropolitan area Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 35 Issue 9 Pages 1198-1208  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Several population-level studies revealed a positive association between breast cancer (BC) incidence and artificial light at night (ALAN) exposure. However, the effect of short-wavelength illumination, implicated by laboratory research and small-scale cohort studies as the main driving force behind BC-ALAN association, has not been supported by any population-level study carried out to date. We investigated a possible link between BC and ALAN of different subspectra using a multi-spectral year-2011 satellite image, taken from the International Space Station, and superimposing it with year-2013 BC incidence data available for the Great Haifa Metropolitan Area in Israel. The analysis was performed using both ordinary least square (OLS) and spatial dependency models, controlling for socioeconomic and locational attributes of the study area. The study revealed strong associations between BC and blue and green light subspectra (B = 0.336 +/- 0.001 and B = 0.335 +/- 0.002, respectively; p < 0.01), compared to a somewhat weaker effect for the red subspectrum (B = 0.056 +/- 0.001; p < 0.01). However, spatial dependency models, controlling for spatial autocorrelation of regression residuals, confirmed only a positive association between BC incidence and short-wavelength (blue) ALAN subspectrum (z = 2.462, p < 0.05) while reporting insignificant associations between BC and either green (z = 1.425, p > 0.1) or red (z = -0.604, p > 0.1) subspectra. The obtained result is in line with the results of laboratory- and small-scale cohort studies linking short-wavelength nighttime illumination with circadian disruption and melatonin suppression. The detected effect of blue lights on BC incidence may help to develop informed illumination policies aimed at minimizing the adverse health effects of ALAN exposure on human health.  
  Address a Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management , University of Haifa , Haifa , Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29768068 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1906  
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