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Author Aboushelib, M.F.; Abozaid, A.A.; Nawar, S.; Hendy, Y.H.M.; Morcos, A.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Preliminary site selection for an observatory in the Egyptian Eastern Desert Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Astrophysics and Space Science Abbreviated Journal Astrophys Space Sci  
  Volume 364 Issue 10 Pages 163  
  Keywords Skyglow; Astronomy; Observatory; Egypt; Africa; Sky Quality Meter  
  Abstract This work aims for choosing preliminary sites that can be candidates for a new astronomical observatory that will replace the Kottamia observatory. The candidate sites have been selected to be investigated after proposing a few criteria. Concerning light pollution and elevation of the sites as the main factors, we chose the candidate sites depending on the zenith sky brightness and the elevation. The night sky brightness has been measured using a Sky Quality Meter at different altitude degrees and the values of the zenith sky brightness were compared to those of different observatory sites. Our night sky brightness observations were found to be in agreement with the satellite’s data and comparable to those of dark sites, with average values of 22.07, 22.03, 21.57 and 21.58 magSQM/arcsec2. We also have obtained the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and extinction coefficient due to the aerosol for the candidate sites using satellite data (Terra/MODIS).  
  Address National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics, Helwan, Cairo, Egypt; m.f.aboushelib(at)nriag.sci.eg  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-640X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2690  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Paranunzio, R.; Ceola, S.; Laio, F.; Montanari, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluating the Effects of Urbanization Evolution on Air Temperature Trends Using Nightlight Satellite Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Atmosphere Abbreviated Journal Atmosphere  
  Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 117  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Confounding factors like urbanization and land-use change could introduce uncertainty to the estimation of global temperature trends related to climate change. In this work, we introduce a new way to investigate the nexus between temporal trends of temperature and urbanization data at the global scale in the period from 1992 to 2013. We analyze air temperature data recorded from more than 5000 weather stations worldwide and nightlight satellite measurements as a proxy for urbanization. By means of a range of statistical methods, our results quantify and outline that the temporal evolution of urbanization affects temperature trends at multiple spatial scales with significant differences at regional and continental scales. A statistically significant agreement in temperature and nightlight trends is detected, especially in low and middle-income regions, where urbanization is rapidly growing. Conversely, in continents such as Europe and North America, increases in temperature trends are typically detected along with non-significant nightlight trends.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2073-4433 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2249  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Long, X.; Tie, X.; Zhou, J.; Dai, W.; Li, X.; Feng, T.; Li, G.; Cao, J.; An, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of the Green Light Program on haze in the North China Plain, China Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Abbreviated Journal Atmos. Chem. Phys.  
  Volume 19 Issue 17 Pages 11185-11197  
  Keywords Economics; Lighting; Planning  
  Abstract As the world's largest developing country, China has undergone ever-increasing demand for electricity during the past few decades. In 1996, China launched the Green Light Program (GLP), which became a national energy conservation activity for saving lighting electricity as well as an effective reduction of the coal consumption for power generation. Despite the great success of the GLP, its effects on haze have not been investigated and well understood. This study focused on assessing the potential coal saving induced by the improvement of luminous efficacy, the core of the GLP, and on estimating the consequent effects on the haze in the North China Plain (NCP), where a large number of power plants are located and are often engulfed by severe haze. The estimated potential coal saving induced by the GLP can reach a massive value of 120–323 million tons, accounting for 6.7 %–18.0 % of the total coal consumption for thermal power generation in China. There was a massive potential emission reduction of air pollutants from thermal power generation in the NCP, which was estimated to be 20.0–53.8 Gg for NOx and 6.9–18.7 Gg for SO2 in December 2015. The potential emission reduction induced by the GLP plays important roles in the haze formation, because the NOx and SO2 are important precursors for the formation of particles. To assess the impact of the GLP on haze, sensitivity studies were conducted by applying a regional chemical–dynamical model (WRF-CHEM). The model results suggest that in the case of lower-limit emission reduction, the PM2.5 concentration decreased by 2–5 µg m−3 in large areas of the NCP. In the case of upper-limit emission reduction, there was much more remarkable decrease in PM2.5 concentration (4–10 µg m−3). This study is a good example to illustrate that scientific innovation can induce important benefits for environment issues such as haze.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1680-7324 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2671  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fu, D.; Xia, X.; Duan, M.; Zhang, X.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Liu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping nighttime PM 2.5 from VIIRS DNB using a linear mixed-effect model Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Atmospheric Environment Abbreviated Journal Atmospheric Environment  
  Volume 178 Issue Pages 214-222  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Estimation of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) from daytime satellite aerosol products is widely reported in the literature; however, remote sensing of nighttime surface PM2.5 from space is very limited. PM2.5 shows a distinct diurnal cycle and PM2.5 concentration at 1:00 local standard time (LST) has a linear correlation coefficient (R) of 0.80 with daily-mean PM2.5. Therefore, estimation of nighttime PM2.5 is required toward an improved understanding of temporal variation of PM2.5 and its effects on air quality. Using data from the Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and hourly PM2.5 data at 35 stations in Beijing, a mixed-effect model is developed here to estimate nighttime PM2.5 from nighttime light radiance measurements based on the assumption that the DNB-PM2.5 relationship is constant spatially but varies temporally. Cross-validation showed that the model developed using all stations predict daily PM2.5 with mean determination coefficient (R2) of 0.87 ±± 0.12, 0.83 ±0.10±0.10, 0.87 ±± 0.09, 0.83 ±± 0.10 in spring, summer, autumn and winter. Further analysis showed that the best model performance was achieved in urban stations with average cross-validation R2 of 0.92. In rural stations, DNB light signal is weak and was likely smeared by lunar illuminance that resulted in relatively poor estimation of PM2.5. The fixed and random parameters of the mixed-effect model in urban stations differed from those in suburban stations, which indicated that the assumption of the mixed-effect model should be carefully evaluated when used at a regional scale.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1352-2310 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1814  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Doumbia, E.H.T.; Liousse, C.; Keita, S.; Granier, L.; Granier, C.; Elvidge, C.D.; Elguindi, N.; Law, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Flaring emissions in Africa: Distribution, evolution and comparison with current inventories Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Atmospheric Environment Abbreviated Journal Atmospheric Environment  
  Volume 199 Issue Pages 423-434  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Flaring emissions are a major concern due to large uncertainties in the amount of chemical compounds released into the atmosphere and their evolution with time. A methodology based on DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) nighttime light data combined with regional gas flaring volumes from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Centers for Environmental Information (NOAA-NCEI) has been developed to estimate flaring emissions. This method is validated in Nigeria where individual field company data are available. The spatial distribution of CO2, CH4, NMVOCs, CO, OC, BC, SO2 and NOx is derived for the African continent for the period 1995–2010.

A range of the emissions due to flaring is estimated based on the range of emission factors (EFs) for each chemical species. An average decrease in CO2 emissions of about 30% is found over Africa from 1995 to 2010, with Nigeria being the largest contributor to this reduction (up to 50%). Changes in the spatial distribution with time indicate local increases, particularly at offshore platforms, which are attributed to a lack of regulations as well as aging infrastructures in oil and gas fields.

Comparisons with current inventories reveal differences in the location and magnitude of point source emissions. For chemical compounds such as NMVOCs and CH4, the ECLIPSE and EDGAR country-level values are considerably higher than the highest flaring emission estimated in this study for 2005. For species such as CO, OC, BC, SO2 and NOx, the emissions provided by the ECLIPSE and EDGAR inventories are generally within the same order of magnitude as the average values found in this study, with the exception of OC, BC and SO2 in which EDGAR provides much lower emissions. These discrepancies are likely due to either differences in the methodologies used to estimate the emissions, in the values of the emission factors considered, or in the definition of flaring sector. Our current estimations suggest that BC, CH4 and CO2 flaring emissions in Africa account for 1–15% (on average 7%), 0.5–8% (on average 2%) and 8–13% (on average 11%) of African total anthropogenic emissions, respectively. The contribution of flaring to African anthropogenic emissions varies widely among countries. For example, in Nigeria the average emissions due to flaring are estimated to be as high as 18% for BC, 10% for CH4 and 50% for CO2, which is significantly greater than the continental average and highlights the importance of emissions in flaring areas.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1352-2310 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2176  
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