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Author Miller, S.D.; Straka III, W.C.; Yue, J.; Seaman, C.J.; Xu, S.; Elvidge, C.D.; Hoffmann, L.; Azeem, I.
Title The Dark Side of Hurricane Matthew: Unique Perspectives from the VIIRS Day/Night Band Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.
Volume 99 Issue 12 Pages 2561-2574
Keywords remote sensing
Abstract Hurricane Matthew (28 Sep – 9 October 2016) was perhaps the most infamous storm of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, claiming over 600 lives and causing over $15 billion USD in damages across the central Caribbean and southeastern U.S. seaboard. Research surrounding Matthew and its many noteworthy meteorological characteristics (e.g., rapid intensification into the southernmost Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic basin on record, strong lightning and sprite production, and unusual cloud morphology) is ongoing. Satellite remote sensing typically plays an important role in the forecasting and study of hurricanes, providing a top-down perspective on storms developing over the remote and inherently data sparse tropical oceans. In this regard, a relative newcomer among the suite of satellite observations useful for tropical cyclone monitoring and research is the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB), a sensor flying onboard the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite. Unlike conventional instruments, the DNB's sensitivity to extremely low levels of visible/near-infrared light offers new insight on storm properties and impacts. Here, we chronicle Matthew’s path of destruction and peer through the DNB’s looking glass of low-light visible observations, including lightning connected to sprite formation, modulation of the atmospheric nightglow by storm-generated gravity waves, and widespread power outages. Collected without moonlight, these examples showcase the wealth of unique information present in DNB nocturnal low-light observations without moonlight, and their potential to complement traditional satellite measurements of tropical storms worldwide.
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ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1959
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Author Beebe, W.
Title Rediscovery of the Bermuda cahow Type Journal Article
Year 1935 Publication (up) Bulletin of the New York Zoological Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 38 Issue Pages 187-190
Keywords Animals
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2556
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Author Karling, J.S.
Title A Preliminary Account of the Influence of Light and Temperature on Growth and Reproduction in Chara fragilis Type Journal Article
Year 1924 Publication (up) Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club Abbreviated Journal Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club
Volume 51 Issue 12 Pages 469
Keywords Plants
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0040-9618 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2404
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Author Apostol, K.; Dumroese, R.K.; Pinto, J.R.; Davis, A.S.
Title Response of conifer species from three latitudinal populations to light spectra generated by light-emitting diodes and high-pressure sodium lamps Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication (up) Canadian Journal of Forest Research Abbreviated Journal Can. J. For. Res.
Volume 45 Issue 12 Pages 1711-1719
Keywords plants
Abstract Light-emitting diode (LED) technology shows promise for supplementing photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in forest nurseries because of the potential reduction in energy consumption and an ability to supply discrete wavelengths to optimize seedling growth. Our objective was to examine the effects of light spectra supplied by LED and traditional high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps on growth and physiology of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) and Picea engelmannii (Engelmann spruce) seedlings. We used three latitudinal sources for each species: British Columbia (BC), Idaho (ID), and New Mexico (NM). Container seedlings were grown for 17 weeks in the greenhouse under an 18-h photoperiod of ambient solar light supplemented with light delivered from HPS or LED. In general, seedlings grown under LED had significantly greater growth, gas exchange rates, and chlorophyll contents than those seedlings grown under HPS. The growth and physiological responses to supplemental lighting varied greatly among species and seed sources. Generally, LED-grown seedlings from BC had the greatest growth and tissue dry matter followed by ID and NM populations. Compared with HPS, the significant increase in seedling growth and concomitant energy savings with LED (29% energy consumption relative to HPS) demonstrates the promise of using LED as PAR supplemental lighting for container seedling production.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0045-5067 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1250
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Author Rumanova, V.S.; Okuliarova, M.; Molcan, L.; Sutovska, H.; Zeman, M.
Title Consequences of low-intensity light at night on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology Abbreviated Journal Can J Physiol Pharmacol
Volume 97 Issue 9 Pages 863-871
Keywords Animals; mouse models
Abstract Circadian rhythms are an inherent property of physiological processes and can be disturbed by irregular environmental cycles, including artificial light at night (ALAN). Circadian disruption may contribute to many pathologies, such as hypertension, obesity and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Our study investigated the consequences of ALAN on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), which represent an animal model of essential hypertension and insulin resistance. Adult males were exposed to a light (L)/dark (D) cycle of 12:12 h and the ALAN group experienced dim light at night (1-2 lux), either for 2 or 5 weeks. Rats on ALAN showed a loss of LD variability for systolic blood pressure (SysBP), but not for heart rate. Moreover, a gradual increase of SysBP was recorded over 5 weeks of ALAN. Exposure to ALAN increased plasma insulin and hepatic triglyceride levels. An increased expression of metabolic transcription factors, Pparalpha and Ppar, in the epididymal fat and a decreased expression of Glut4 in the heart was found in the ALAN group. Our results demonstrate that low-intensity ALAN can disturb BP control and augment insulin resistance in SHR, and may represent a serious risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases.
Address Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Animal Physiology and Ethology , Ilkovicova 6 , Slovakia , Bratislava, Slovakia, Slovakia , 84215 ; mzeman@fns.uniba.sk
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0008-4212 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:31251886 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2567
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