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Author Łopuszyńska, A.; Bartyna-Zielińska, M.; Kaźmierczak, B.; Jadwiszczak, P.; Kutyłowska, M.; Miller, U.
Title Lighting of urban green areas – the case of Grabiszyn Park in Wrocław. Searching for the balance between light and darkness through social and technical issues Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) E3S Web of Conferences Abbreviated Journal E3S Web Conf.
Volume 100 Issue Pages 00049
Keywords Society; Lighting
Abstract Illuminating the urban green spaces could lead to conflicts of spatial, technical and social nature. This relatively new, though already global, problem is expected to grow bigger with the further increase of urban areas artificial brightness. The case of Grabiszyn Park in Wrocław is an example of how difficult it is to find a balance between big-city lights and a natural darkness. The situation is even more difficult if the light is not legally recognized as a significant source of air pollution and direct nuisance at the legal level. The aim of the paper is to recognize the broader perspective of urban greenery lighting issues, global recommendations basis and the local awareness. The authors also made an attempt to analyze and assess the project implementation, as well as to characterize the components of the quality of an urban green areas lighting.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2267-1242 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2603
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Author Eberenz, S.; Stocker, D.; Röösli, T.; Bresch, D.N.
Title Asset exposure data for global physical risk assessment Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Earth System Science Data Abbreviated Journal Earth Syst. Sci. Data
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 817-833
Keywords Economics
Abstract One of the challenges in globally consistent assessments of physical climate risks is the fact thatasset exposure data are either unavailable or restricted to single countries or regions. We introduce a globalhigh-resolution asset exposure dataset responding to this challenge. The data are produced using “lit population”(LitPop), a globally consistent methodology to disaggregate asset value data proportional to a combination ofnightlight intensity and geographical population data. By combining nightlight and population data, unwantedartefacts such as blooming, saturation, and lack of detail are mitigated. Thus, the combination of both data typesimproves the spatial distribution of macroeconomic indicators. Due to the lack of reported subnational assetdata, the disaggregation methodology cannot be validated for asset values. Therefore, we compare disaggregatedgross domestic product (GDP) per subnational administrative region to reported gross regional product (GRP)values for evaluation. The comparison for 14 industrialized and newly industrialized countries shows that thedisaggregation skill for GDP using nightlights or population data alone is not as high as using a combinationof both data types. The advantages of LitPop are global consistency, scalability, openness, replicability, and lowentry threshold. The open-source LitPop methodology and the publicly available asset exposure data offer valuefor manifold use cases, including globally consistent economic disaster risk assessments and climate changeadaptation studies, especially for larger regions, yet at considerably high resolution. The code is published onGitHub as part of the open-source software CLIMADA (CLIMate ADAptation) and archived in the ETH DataArchive with the link https://doi.org/10.5905/ethz-1007-226 (Bresch et al., 2019b). The resulting asset exposuredataset for 224 countries is archived in the ETH Research Repository with the link https://doi.org/10.3929/ethz-b-000331316 (Eberenz et al., 2019).
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ISSN 1866-3516 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2883
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Author Aubrecht, C.; Stojan-Dolar, M.; de Sherbinin, A.; Jaiteh, M.; Longcore, T.; Elvidge, C.
Title Lighting governance for protected areas and beyond – Identifying the urgent need for sustainable management of artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication (up) Earthzine Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages e61460
Keywords Editorial
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 465
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Author Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C. D.; Ziskin, D.; Longcore, T.; Rich, C.
Title 'When the lights stay on' – A novel approach to assessing human impact on the environment. Earth. Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication (up) Earthzine Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Ecology
Abstract A consequence of the explosive expansion of human civilization has been the global loss of biodiversity and changes to life-sustaining geophysical processes of Earth. The footprint of human occupation is uniquely visible from space in the form of artificial night lighting – ranging from the burning of the rainforest to massive offshore fisheries to omnipresent lights of cities, towns, and villages. This article describes a novel approach to assessing global human impact using satellite observed nighttime lights. The results provide reef managers and governments a first-pass screening tool for reef conservation projects. Sites requiring restoration and precautionary actions can be identified and assessed further in more focused investigations. We hope to create a mental picture for others to see and encourage participation in maintaining and restoring the natural world.
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 569
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Author Hüppop, O.; Ciach, M.; Diehl, R.; Reynolds, D.R.; Stepanian, P.M.; Menz, M.H.M.
Title Perspectives and challenges for the use of radar in biological conservation Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Ecography Abbreviated Journal Ecography
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Review
Abstract Radar is at the forefront for the study of broad‐scale aerial movements of birds, bats and insects and related issues in biological conservation. Radar techniques are especially useful for investigating species which fly at high altitudes, in darkness, or which are too small for applying electronic tags. Here, we present an overview of radar applications in biological conservation and highlight its future possibilities. Depending on the type of radar, information can be gathered on local‐ to continental‐scale movements of airborne organisms and their behaviour. Such data can quantify flyway usage, biomass and nutrient transport (bioflow), population sizes, dynamics and distributions, times and dimensions of movements, areas and times of mass emergence and swarming, habitat use and activity ranges. Radar also captures behavioural responses to anthropogenic disturbances, artificial light and man‐made structures. Weather surveillance and other long‐range radar networks allow spatially broad overviews of important stopover areas, songbird mass roosts and emergences from bat caves. Mobile radars, including repurposed marine radars and commercially dedicated ‘bird radars’, offer the ability to track and monitor the local movements of individuals or groups of flying animals. Harmonic radar techniques have been used for tracking short‐range movements of insects and other small animals of conservation interest. However, a major challenge in aeroecology is determining the taxonomic identity of the targets, which often requires ancillary data obtained from other methods. Radar data have become a global source of information on ecosystem structure, composition, services and function and will play an increasing role in the monitoring and conservation of flying animals and threatened habitats worldwide.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2204
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