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Author Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C. D.; Ziskin, D.; Longcore, T.; Rich, C.
Title 'When the lights stay on' – A novel approach to assessing human impact on the environment. Earth. Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication (up) Earthzine Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Ecology
Abstract A consequence of the explosive expansion of human civilization has been the global loss of biodiversity and changes to life-sustaining geophysical processes of Earth. The footprint of human occupation is uniquely visible from space in the form of artificial night lighting – ranging from the burning of the rainforest to massive offshore fisheries to omnipresent lights of cities, towns, and villages. This article describes a novel approach to assessing global human impact using satellite observed nighttime lights. The results provide reef managers and governments a first-pass screening tool for reef conservation projects. Sites requiring restoration and precautionary actions can be identified and assessed further in more focused investigations. We hope to create a mental picture for others to see and encourage participation in maintaining and restoring the natural world.
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 569
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Author Hüppop, O.; Ciach, M.; Diehl, R.; Reynolds, D.R.; Stepanian, P.M.; Menz, M.H.M.
Title Perspectives and challenges for the use of radar in biological conservation Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Ecography Abbreviated Journal Ecography
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Review
Abstract Radar is at the forefront for the study of broad‐scale aerial movements of birds, bats and insects and related issues in biological conservation. Radar techniques are especially useful for investigating species which fly at high altitudes, in darkness, or which are too small for applying electronic tags. Here, we present an overview of radar applications in biological conservation and highlight its future possibilities. Depending on the type of radar, information can be gathered on local‐ to continental‐scale movements of airborne organisms and their behaviour. Such data can quantify flyway usage, biomass and nutrient transport (bioflow), population sizes, dynamics and distributions, times and dimensions of movements, areas and times of mass emergence and swarming, habitat use and activity ranges. Radar also captures behavioural responses to anthropogenic disturbances, artificial light and man‐made structures. Weather surveillance and other long‐range radar networks allow spatially broad overviews of important stopover areas, songbird mass roosts and emergences from bat caves. Mobile radars, including repurposed marine radars and commercially dedicated ‘bird radars’, offer the ability to track and monitor the local movements of individuals or groups of flying animals. Harmonic radar techniques have been used for tracking short‐range movements of insects and other small animals of conservation interest. However, a major challenge in aeroecology is determining the taxonomic identity of the targets, which often requires ancillary data obtained from other methods. Radar data have become a global source of information on ecosystem structure, composition, services and function and will play an increasing role in the monitoring and conservation of flying animals and threatened habitats worldwide.
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ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2204
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Author Sullivan, S.M.P.; Hossler, K.; Meyer, L.A.
Title Artificial lighting at night alters aquatic-riparian invertebrate food webs Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Ecological Applications : a Publication of the Ecological Society of America Abbreviated Journal Ecol Appl
Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages e01821
Keywords Ecology; Animals
Abstract Artificial lighting at night (ALAN) is a global phenomenon that can be detrimental to organisms at individual and population levels, yet potential consequences for communities and ecosystem functions are less resolved. Riparian systems may be particularly vulnerable to ALAN. We investigated the impacts of ALAN on invertebrate community composition and food web characteristics for linked aquatic-terrestrial ecosystems. We focused on food chain length (FCL), a central property of ecological communities that can influence their structure, function, and stability; and the contribution of aquatically derived energy (i.e., nutritional subsidies originating from stream periphyton). We collected terrestrial arthropods and emergent aquatic insects from a suite of stream and wetland sites in Columbus, Ohio, USA. Stable isotopes of carbon ((13) C) and nitrogen ((15) N) were used to infer FCL and contribution of aquatically derived energy. We found that moderate-to-high levels of ALAN altered invertebrate community composition, favoring primarily predators and detritivores. Impacts of ALAN, however, were very taxon specific as illustrated, for example, by the negative impact of ALAN on the abundance of orb-web spiders belonging to the families Tetragnathidae and Araneidae: key invertebrate riparian predators. Most notably, we observed decreases in both invertebrate FCL and reliance on aquatically derived energy under ALAN (although aquatic energetic contributions appeared to increase again at higher levels of ALAN), in addition to shifts in the timing of reciprocal nutritional subsidies. Our study demonstrates that ALAN can alter the flows of energy between aquatic and terrestrial systems, thereby representing an environmental perturbation that can cross ecosystem boundaries. Given projections for global increases in ALAN, both in terms of coverage and intensity, these results have broad implications for stream ecosystem structure and function.
Address Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, School of Environment & Natural Resources, The Ohio State University, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, Ohio, 43210, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30566269 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2150
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Kjellberg Jensen, J.; de Jong, M.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.
Title Artificial light at night, in interaction with spring temperature, modulates timing of reproduction in a passerine bird Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Ecological Applications : a Publication of the Ecological Society of America Abbreviated Journal Ecol Appl
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals; Parus major; Alan; light pollution; phenology; timing of reproduction; urbanization
Abstract The ecological impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) on phenological events such as reproductive timing is increasingly recognized. In birds, previous experiments under controlled conditions showed that ALAN strongly advances gonadal growth, but effects on egg-laying date are less clear. In particular, effects of ALAN on timing of egg-laying are found to be year-dependent, suggesting an interaction with climatic conditions such as spring temperature, which is known have strong effects on the phenology of avian breeding. Thus, we hypothesized that ALAN and temperature interact to regulate timing of reproduction in wild birds. Field studies have suggested that sources of ALAN rich in short wavelengths can lead to stronger advances in egg-laying date. We therefore tested this hypothesis in the great tit (Parus major), using a replicated experimental setup where eight previously unlit forest transects were illuminated with either white, green, or red LED light, or left dark as controls. We measured timing of egg-laying for 619 breeding events spread over six consecutive years and obtained temperature data for all sites and years. We detected overall significantly earlier egg-laying dates in the white and green light versus the dark treatment, and similar trends for red light. However, there was a strong inter-annual variability in mean egg-laying dates in all treatments, which was explained by spring temperature. We did not detect any fitness consequence of the changed timing of egg-laying due to ALAN, which suggests that advancing reproduction in response to ALAN might be adaptive.
Address Plant Ecology and Nature Conservation Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31863538 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2805
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Author Kosicki, J.Z.
Title Anthropogenic activity expressed as ‘artificial light at night’ improves predictive density distribution in bird populations Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Ecological Complexity Abbreviated Journal Ecological Complexity
Volume 41 Issue Pages 100809
Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals; Ecology
Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) is one of the most important anthropogenic environmental components that affects biodiversity worldwide. Despite extensive knowledge on ALAN, being a measure of human activity that directly impacts numerous aspects of animal behaviour, such as orientation and distribution, little is known about its effects on density distribution on a large spatial scale. That is why we decided to explore by means of the Species Distribution Modelling approach (SDM) how ALAN as one of 33 predictors determines farmland and forest bird species densities. In order to safeguard study results from any inconsistency caused by the chosen method, we used two approaches, i.e. the Generalised Additive Model (GAM) and the Random Forest (RF). Within each approach, we developed two models for two bird species, the Black woodpecker and the European stonechat: the first with ALAN, and the second without ALAN as an additional predictor. Having used out-of-bag procedures in the RF approach, information-theoretic criteria for the GAM, and evaluation models based on an independent dataset, we demonstrated that models with ALAN had higher predictive density power than models without it. The Black woodpecker definitely and linearly avoids anthropogenic activity, defined by the level of artificial light, while the European stonechat tolerates human activity to some degree, especially in farmland habitats. What is more, a heuristic analysis of predictive maps based on models without ALAN shows that both species reach high densities in regions where they are deemed rare. Hence, the study proves that urbanisation processes, which can be reflected by ALAN, are among key predictors necessary for developing Species Density Distribution Models for both farmland and forest bird species.
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ISSN 1476945X ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2776
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