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Author Chen, Y.; Cheng, M.; Su, T.; Gao, T.; Yu, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Constant light exposure aggravates POMC-mediated muscle wasting associated with hypothalamic alteration of circadian clock and SIRT1 in endotoxemia rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications Abbreviated Journal Biochem Biophys Res Commun  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Constant light exposure is widespread in the intensive care unit (ICU) and could increase the rate of brain dysfunction as delirium and sleep disorders in critical patients. And the activation of hypothalamic neuropeptides is proved to play a crucial role in regulating hypercatabolism, especially skeletal muscle wasting in critical patients, which could lead to serious complications and poor prognosis. Here we investigated the hypothesis that constant light exposure could aggravate skeletal muscle wasting in endotoxemia rats and whether it was associated with alterations of circadian clock and hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin(POMC) expression. Fifty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide(LPS) or saline, subjected to constant light or a 12:12h light-dark cycle for 7 days. On day 8, rats were sacrificed across six time points in 24h and hypothalamus tissues and skeletal muscle were obtained. Rates of muscle wasting were measured by 3-methylhistidine(3-MH) and tyrosine release as well as expression of two muscle atrophic genes, muscle ring finger 1(MuRF-1) and muscle atrophy F-box(MAFbx). The expression of circadian clock genes, silent information regulator 1(SIRT1), POMC and hypothalamic inflammatory cytokines were also detected. Results showed that LPS administration significantly increased hypothalamic POMC expression, inflammatory cytokine levels and muscle wasting rates. Meanwhile constant light exposure disrupted the circadian rhythm, declined the expression of SIRT1 as well as aggravated hypothalamic POMC overexpression and skeletal muscle wasting in rats with endotoxemia. Taken together, the results demonstrated that constant light exposure could aggravate POMC-mediated skeletal muscle wasting in endotoxemia rats, which is associated with alteration of circadian clocks and SIRT1 in the hypothalamus.  
  Address Department of Intensive Care Unit, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210008, China. Electronic address: yudrnj2@163.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-291X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30528733 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2134  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Colman, L.P.; Lara, P.H.; Bennie, J.; Broderick, A.C.; de Freitas, J.R.; Marcondes, A.; Witt, M.J.; Godley, B.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing coastal artificial light and potential exposure of wildlife at a national scale: the case of marine turtles in Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) Biodiversity and Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biodivers Conserv  
  Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 1135-1152  
  Keywords Animals; Artificial light; Coastal development; Remote sensing; Loggerhead turtle; Hawksbill turtle; Olive ridley turtle; Leatherback turtle; marine turtles; Dermochelys coriacea; Lepidochelys olivacea; Eretmochelys imbricata; Caretta caretta  
  Abstract Coastal areas provide critical nesting habitat for marine turtles. Understanding how artificial light might impact populations is key to guide management strategies. Here we assess the extent to which nesting populations of four marine turtle species—leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea), olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea), hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) and two subpopulations of loggerhead (Caretta caretta) turtles—are exposed to light pollution across 604 km of the Brazilian coast. We used yearly night-time satellite images from two 5-year periods (1992–1996 and 2008–2012) from the US Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Programme (DMSP) to determine the proportion of nesting areas that are exposed to detectable levels of artificial light and identify how this has changed over time. Over the monitored time-frame, 63.7% of the nesting beaches experienced an increase in night light levels. Based on nest densities, we identified 54 reproductive hotspots: 62.9% were located in areas potentially exposed to light pollution. Light levels appeared to have a significant effect on nest densities of hawksbills and the northern loggerhead turtle stock, however high nest densities were also seen in lit areas. The status of all species/subpopulations has improved across the time period despite increased light levels. These findings suggest that (1) nest site selection is likely primarily determined by variables other than light and (2) conservation strategies in Brazil appear to have been successful in contributing to reducing impacts on nesting beaches. There is, however, the possibility that light also affects hatchlings in coastal waters, and impacts on population recruitment may take longer to fully manifest in nesting numbers. Recommendations are made to further this work to provide deeper insights into the impacts of anthropogenic light on marine turtles.  
  Address Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn, TR10 9EZ, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-3115 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3382  
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Author Lundberg, L.; Sienkiewicz, Z.; Anthony, D.C.; Broom, K.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on circadian rhythm control in mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Bioelectromagnetics Abbreviated Journal Bioelectromagnetics  
  Volume 40 Issue 4 Pages 250-259  
  Keywords Animals; mouse models; magnetic fields  
  Abstract Artificial light and power frequency magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the built environment. Light is a potent zeitgeber but it is unclear whether power frequency magnetic fields can influence circadian rhythm control. To study this possibility, 8-12-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were exposed for 30 min starting at zeitgeber time 14 (ZT14, 2 h into the dark period of the day) to 50 Hz magnetic fields at 580 muT using a pair of Helmholtz coils and/or a blue LED light at 700 lux or neither. Our experiments revealed an acute adrenal response to blue light, in terms of increased adrenal per1 gene expression, increased serum corticosterone levels, increased time spent sleeping, and decreased locomotor activity (in all cases, P < 0.0001) compared to an unexposed control group. There appeared to be no modulating effect of the magnetic fields on the response to light, and there was also no effect of the magnetic fields alone (in both cases, P > 0.05) except for a decrease in locomotor activity (P < 0.03). Gene expression of the cryptochromes cry1 and cry2 in the adrenals, liver, and hippocampus was also not affected by exposures (in all cases, P > 0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that 50 Hz magnetic fields do not significantly affect the acute light response to a degree that can be detected in the adrenal response.  
  Address Public Health England, Chilton, United Kingdom;  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0197-8462 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30945762 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2289  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jurić M., Gaiduk M., Seepold R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of Illuminance on Sleep Onset Latency in IoT Based Lighting System Environment. Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11495 Issue Pages 429-438  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The exposure to the light has a great influence on human beings in their everyday life. Various lighting sources produce light that reaches the human eye and influences a rhythmic release of melatonin hormone, that is a sleep promoting factor.

Since the development of new technologies provides more control over illuminance, this work uses an IoT based lighting system to set up dim and bright scenarios. A small study has been performed on the influence of illuminance on sleep latency. The system consists of different light bulbs, sensors and a central bridge which are interconnected like a mesh network. Also, a mobile app has been developed, that allows to adjust the lighting in various rooms. With the help of a ferro-electret sensor, like applied in sleep monitoring systems, a subject’s sleep was monitored. The sensor is placed below the mattress and it collects data, which is stored and processed in a cloud or in other alternative locations.

The research was conducted on healthy young subjects after being previously exposed to the preconfigured illuminance for at least three hours before bedtime. The results indicate correlation between sleep onset latency and exposure to different illuminance before bedtime. In a dimmed environment, the subject fell asleep in average 28% faster compared to the brighter environment.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2555  
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Author Singhal, R. K.; Chauhan, J.; Jatav, H. S.; Rajput, V. D.; Singh, G. S.; Bose, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial night light alters ecosystem services provided by biotic components. Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication (up) BIOLOGIA FUTURA Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Review; Ecology  
  Abstract The global catastrophe of natural biodiversity and ecosystem services are expedited with the growing human population. Repercussions of artificial light at night ALAN are much wider, as it varies from unicellular to higher organism. Subsequently, hastened pollution and over exploitation of natural resources accelerate the expeditious transformation of climatic phenomenon and further cause global biodiversity losses. Moreover, it has a crucial role in global biodiversity and ecosystem services losses via influencing the ecosystem biodiversity by modulating abundance, number and aggregation at every levels as from individual to biome levels. Along with these affects, it disturbs the population, genetics and landscape structures by interfering inter- and intra-species interactions and landscape formation processes. Furthermore, alterations in normal light/dark (diurnal) signalling disrupt the stable physiological, biochemical, and molecular processes and modulate the regulating, cultural and provisioning ecosystem services and ultimately disorganize the stable ecosystem structure and functions. Moreover, ALAN reshapes the abiotic component of the ecosystem, and as a key component of global warming via producing greenhouse gases via emitting light. By taking together the above facts, this review highlights the impact of ALAN on the ecosystem and its living and non-living components, emphasizing to the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. Further, we summarize the means of minimizing strategies of ALAN in the environment, which are very crucial to reduce the further spread of night light contamination in the environment and can be useful to minimize the drastic impacts on the ecosystem.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3323  
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