toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Garrett, J. K., Donald, P. F., & Gaston, K. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Skyglow extends into the world’s Key Biodiversity Areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow; Conservation  
  Abstract The proportion of the Earth’s surface that experiences a naturally dark environment at night is rapidly declining with the introduction of artificial light. Biological impacts of this change have been documented from genes to ecosystems, and for a wide diversity of environments and organisms. The likely severity of these impacts depends heavily on the relationship between the distribution of artificial night-time lighting and biodiversity. Here, we carry out a global assessment of the overlap between areas of conservation priority and the most recent atlas of artificial skyglow. We show that of the world’s Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs), less than a third have completely pristine night-time skies, about a half lie entirely under artificially bright skies and only about a fifth contain no area in which night-time skies are not polluted to the zenith. The extent of light pollution of KBAs varies by region, affecting the greatest proportion of KBAs in Europe and the Middle East. Statistical modelling revealed associations between light pollution within KBAs and associated levels of both gross domestic product and human population density. This suggests that these patterns will worsen with continued economic development and growth in the human population  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2309  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Navas Gonzalez, F.J.; Jordana Vidal, J.; Pizarro Inostroza, G.; Arando Arbulu, A.; Delgado Bermejo, J.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Can Donkey Behavior and Cognition Be Used to Trace Back, Explain, or Forecast Moon Cycle and Weather Events? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)  
  Volume 8 Issue 11 Pages  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals  
  Abstract Donkeys have been reported to be highly sensitive to environmental changes. Their 8900-8400-year-old evolution process made them interact with diverse environmental situations that were very distant from their harsh origins. These changing situations not only affect donkeys' short-term behavior but may also determine their long-term cognitive skills from birth. Thus, animal behavior becomes a useful tool to obtain past, present or predict information from the environmental situation of a particular area. We performed an operant conditioning test on 300 donkeys to assess their response type, mood, response intensity, and learning capabilities, while we simultaneously registered 14 categorical environmental factors. We quantified the effect power of such environmental factors on donkey behavior and cognition. We used principal component analysis (CATPCA) to reduce the number of factors affecting each behavioral variable and built categorical regression (CATREG) equations to model for the effects of potential factor combinations. Effect power ranged from 7.9% for the birth season on learning (p < 0.05) to 38.8% for birth moon phase on mood (p < 0.001). CATPCA suggests the percentage of variance explained by a four-dimension-model (comprising the dimensions of response type, mood, response intensity and learning capabilities), is 75.9%. CATREG suggests environmental predictors explain 28.8% of the variability of response type, 37.0% of mood, and 37.5% of response intensity, and learning capabilities.  
  Address The Worldwide Donkey Breeds Project, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba, Spain. juanviagr218@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30463193 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2083  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adams, J. url  openurl
  Title Duration of Light and Growth Type Journal Article
  Year 1924 Publication (up) Annals of Botany Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 38 Issue 151 Pages 509-523  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2391  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adams, J. url  openurl
  Title The Effect on Certain Plants of altering the Daily Period of Light Type Journal Article
  Year 1923 Publication (up) Annals of Botany Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 37 Issue 145 Pages 75-94  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2406  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Daugaard, S.; Markvart, J.; Bonde, J.P.; Christoffersen, J.; Garde, A.H.; Hansen, A.M.; Schlunssen, V.; Vestergaard, J.M.; Vistisen, H.T.; Kolstad, H.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Exposure during Days with Night, Outdoor, and Indoor Work Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Annals of Work Exposures and Health Abbreviated Journal Ann Work Expo Health  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess light exposure during days with indoor, outdoor, and night work and days off work. METHODS: Light intensity was continuously recorded for 7 days across the year among indoor (n = 170), outdoor (n = 151), and night workers (n = 188) in Denmark (55-56 degrees N) equipped with a personal light recorder. White light intensity, duration above 80, 1000, and 2500 lux, and proportion of red, green, and blue light was depicted by time of the day and season for work days and days off work. RESULTS: Indoor workers' average light exposure only intermittently exceeded 1000 lux during daytime working hours in summer and never in winter. During daytime working hours, most outdoor workers exceeded 2500 lux in summer and 1000 lux in winter. Night workers spent on average 10-50 min >80 lux when working night shifts. During days off work, indoor and night workers were exposed to higher light intensities than during work days and few differences were seen between indoor, outdoor, and night workers. The spectral composition of light was similar for indoor, outdoor, and night workers during days at and off work. CONCLUSION: The night workers of this study were during night hours on average exposed for a limited time to light intensities expected to suppress melatonin. The indoor workers were exposed to light levels during daylight hours that may reduce general well-being and mood, especially in winter. Outdoor workers were during summer daylight hours exposed to light levels comparable to those used for the treatment of depression.  
  Address Department of Occupational Medicine, Danish Ramazinni Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, 8200 Aarhus, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2398-7308 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30865270 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2268  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: