|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Hamacher, D.W.; De Napoli, K.; Mott, B.
Title Whitening the Sky: light pollution as a form of cultural genocide Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Dark Sky Studies Abbreviated Journal J of Dark Sky Studies
Volume 1 Issue in press Pages
Keywords Society; Blue-rich light sources; indigenous knowledge; aboriginal australia; torres strait islanders; decolonizing methodologies
Abstract Light pollution is actively destroying our ability to see the stars and disconnecting people from their deep-time connection to the sky, acting as a form of ongoing cultural and ecological genocide for Indigenous people around the world. Many traditional knowledge systems are based on the stars and peoples' ablity to observe and interpret them for a range of practical, social, and scientific purposes is critical. Efforts to reduce, minimise, or eliminate light pollution are being achieved with varying degrees of success, but the increased use of blue-light emitting LEDs as a cost-effective solution is worsening problems related to human health, wildlife, and astronomical heritage for the benefit of capitalistic economic growth. We provide a brief overview illustrating some of the important connections that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people maintain with the stars, as well as the worsening damage growing light pollution is causing to this ancient knowledge. We propose a transdisciplinary approach to solving the issues of growing light pollution, using a foundation based on Indigenous philosophies and decolonising methodologies.
Address ARC Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics in Three Dimensions (ASTRO-3D), School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 30130, Australia; duane.hamacher@unimelb.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) University of Utah Place of Publication USA Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2780
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wallace, H. D.
Title Electric Lighting Policy in the Federal Government, 1880-2016 Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords History; Policy; Lighting
Abstract Federal policies have targeted electric lighting since the 1880s with varying success. This dissertation examines the history of those policies to understand policy makers’ intent and how their decisions affected the course of events. This qualitative study poses three research questions: How have changes in lamp efficacy affected policy development? How and why have federal policies targeted electric lighting? How have private sector actors adapted public policy to further their own goals? The analysis uses an interdisciplinary approach taking advantage of overlapping methodologies drawn from policy and political sciences, economics, and the history of technology. The concepts of path dependency, context, and actor networks are especially important. Adoption of electric lighting spurred the construction of complex and capital intensive infrastructures now considered indispensable, and lighting always consumed a significant fraction of US electric power. Engineers and scientists created many lamps over the decades, in part to meet a growing demand for energy efficient products. Invention and diffusion of those lamps occurred amid changing standards and definitions of efficiency, shifting relations between network actors, and the development of path dependencies that constrained efforts to affect change. Federal actors typically used lighting policy to conserve resources, promote national security, or to symbolically emphasize the onset of a national crisis. The study shows that after an initial introductory phase, lighting-specific policies developed during two distinct periods. The earlier period consisted of intermittent, crisis-driven federal interventions of mixed success. The later period featured a sustained engagement between public and private sectors wherein incremental adjustments achieved policy goals. A time of transition occurred between the two main periods during which technical, economic, and political contexts changed, while several core social values remained constant. In both early and later periods, private sector actors used policy opportunities to further commercial goals, a practice that public sector actors in the later period used to promote policy acceptance. Recently enacted energy standards removing ordinary incandescent lamps in favor of high efficiency lamps mark the end of the later period. Apparent success means that policy makers should reconsider how they use lighting to achieve future goals.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis
Publisher (down) University of Maryland Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2210
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bryant, J.M.; Hake, H.G.
Title A decision support system for assessment of street lighting tenders based on energy performance indicators and environmental criteria: Overview, methodology and case study Type Journal Article
Year 1911 Publication University of Illinois Bulletin Abbreviated Journal
Volume 9 Issue 8 Pages Bulletin No. 51
Keywords Lighting; Energy; Economics; Planning
Abstract It is the purpose of this bulletin to make available information concerning street illumination. The suggestion which led to this compilation came from the many inquiries received by the Electrical Engineering Department each year from those interested in framing ordinances permitting corporations or individuals to operate street lighting systems. An attempt has been made to present this information in such a form as to be readily understood by the general public, without requiring any special technical knowledge. The data have been compiled from reliable sources, and checked in many instances by tests conducted by the writers.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, College of Engineering Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2739
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Clayson, Hollis
Title Illuminated Paris, Essays on Art and Lighting in the Belle Époque Type Book Whole
Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords History; Society; Art
Abstract The City of Light. For many, these four words instantly conjure late nineteenth-century Paris and the garish colors of Toulouse-Lautrec’s iconic posters. More recently, the Eiffel Tower’s nightly show of sparkling electric lights has come to exemplify our fantasies of Parisian nightlife. Though we reflect longingly on such scenes, in Illuminated Paris, Hollis Clayson shows that there’s more to these clichés than meets the eye. In this richly illustrated book, she traces the dramatic evolution of lighting in Paris and how artists responded to the shifting visual and cultural scenes that resulted from these technologies. While older gas lighting produced a haze of orange, new electric lighting was hardly an improvement: the glare of experimental arc lights—themselves dangerous—left figures looking pale and ghoulish. As Clayson shows, artists’ representations of these new colors and shapes reveal turn-of-the-century concerns about modernization as electric lighting came to represent the harsh glare of rapidly accelerating social change. At the same time, in part thanks to American artists visiting the city, these works of art also produced our enduring romantic view of Parisian glamour and its Belle Époque.
Address Chicago
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) University of Chicago Press Place of Publication Chicago Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 9780226593869 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2231
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gaston, K.J.
Title Nighttime Ecology: The “Nocturnal Problem” Revisited Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The American Naturalist Abbreviated Journal The American Naturalist
Volume 193 Issue 4 Pages 481-502
Keywords Ecology; activity; diel; ecosystems; macroecology; nighttime; nocturnal; time partitioning
Abstract The existence of a synthetic program of research on what was then termed the “nocturnal problem” and that we might now call “nighttime ecology” was declared more than 70 years ago. In reality, this failed to materialize, arguably as a consequence of practical challenges in studying organisms at night and instead concentrating on the existence of circadian rhythms, the mechanisms that give rise to them, and their consequences. This legacy is evident to this day, with consideration of the ecology of the nighttime markedly underrepresented in ecological research and literature. However, several factors suggest that it would be timely to revive the vision of a comprehensive research program in nighttime ecology. These include (i) that the study of the ecology of the night is being revolutionized by new and improved technologies; (ii) suggestions that, far from being a minor component of biodiversity, a high proportion of animal species are active at night; (iii) that fundamental questions about differences and connections between the ecology of the daytime and the nighttime remain largely unanswered; and (iv) that the nighttime environment is coming under severe anthropogenic pressure. In this article, I seek to reestablish nighttime ecology as a synthetic program of research, highlighting key focal topics and questions and providing an overview of the current state of understanding and developments.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, United Kingdom; and Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, Institute for Advanced Study, Wallotstrasse 19, 14193 Berlin, Germany; k.j.gaston(at)exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) University of Chicago Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-0147 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2254
Permanent link to this record