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Author Kim, K.‐N.; Sin, U.‐C.; Jo, Y.‐C.; Huang, Z.‐J.; Hassan, A.; Huang, Q.‐Y.; Lei, C.‐L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of green light at night on Juvenile hormone in the oriental armyworm Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Physiological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Physiol. Entomol.  
  Volume 44 Issue 3-4 Pages 245-251  
  Keywords Animals; armyworm; Mythimna separata; Insects; Asia; green light  
  Abstract The oriental armyworm Mythimna separata is an agricultural insect pest in Eastern Asia. Mythimna separata moths have a high phototactic response to green (520 nm) light. The biological characteristics of insects living under light of a specific wavelength at night can change and, accordingly, Juvenile hormone (JH) levels may be influenced by this light. The present study evaluates changes in the total JH levels at different developmental stages (larvae, pupae and adults) of M. separata reared under green light with different exposure periods at night (or dark period). The results show that, when the exposure time per day of the green light at night is extended, the JH levels in the final‐instar larvae (22 days) and older age pupae (8 days) are significantly reduced, and the JH levels in earlier age pupae (4 days) and adults (3, 6 and 9 days) are significantly increased, compared with groups not exposed to green light. Additionally, the JH level of male moths significantly differs from that of the female moths. We suggest that the JH level of M. separata insects could be regulated by the green light at night (or dark period). The findings of the present study will help to explain the relationship between the light environment and biological characteristics in nocturnal moths.  
  Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China; ioir(at)mail.hzau.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0307-6962 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2596  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Garrett, J. K., Donald, P. F., & Gaston, K. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Skyglow extends into the world’s Key Biodiversity Areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages cv.12480  
  Keywords Skyglow; Conservation; Biodiversity; Key Biodiversity Area; KBA  
  Abstract The proportion of the Earth’s surface that experiences a naturally dark environment at night is rapidly declining with the introduction of artificial light. Biological impacts of this change have been documented from genes to ecosystems, and for a wide diversity of environments and organisms. The likely severity of these impacts depends heavily on the relationship between the distribution of artificial night-time lighting and biodiversity. Here, we carry out a global assessment of the overlap between areas of conservation priority and the most recent atlas of artificial skyglow. We show that of the world’s Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs), less than a third have completely pristine night-time skies, about a half lie entirely under artificially bright skies and only about a fifth contain no area in which night-time skies are not polluted to the zenith. The extent of light pollution of KBAs varies by region, affecting the greatest proportion of KBAs in Europe and the Middle East. Statistical modelling revealed associations between light pollution within KBAs and associated levels of both gross domestic product and human population density. This suggests that these patterns will worsen with continued economic development and growth in the human population  
  Address Environment & Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, UK; j.k.garrett(at)exeter.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2309  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hasegawa‐Ohira, M., Kato, Y., & Nomura, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of LED lighting exposure during sleep on endocrine and autonomic nervous system activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication IEEJ Transactions on Electrical and Electronic Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 14 Issue 6 Pages 894-898  
  Keywords Human Health; LED; endocrine; sleep; sympathetic nervous system; hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal pathway  
  Abstract The present study aimed to investigate the effect of an LED lighting on endocrine and autonomic nervous system activity during sleep. In a within‐subject experimental design, participants, ten healthy male students, took a 6‐h sleep from 0:00–6:00 am in an environmentally controlled room during which they were exposed to an LED lighting of approximately 50 lx for 90 min from 1:30–3:00 am, whereas there was no light exposure under the control condition. Compared to the control condition, the heart rate (HR) during light exposure, 1 h before awakening, and 1 h after awakening, was significantly higher under the light exposure condition. Salivary melatonin under the light exposure was significantly higher than that under control condition, meanwhile there was no difference in salivary cortisol secretion. Light exposure during sleep may enhance the sympathetic nervous system activation but not give an impact on the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal pathway during sleep.  
  Address Faculty of Education, Shiga University, 2‐5‐1 Hiratsu Ostu, Shiga, 520‐0862 Japan; ohira@edu.shiga-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2347  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Edensor, T.; Andrews, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Walking the creek: reconnecting place through light projection Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Geographical Research Abbreviated Journal Geographical Research  
  Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 263-274  
  Keywords Society; Psychology; Australia; public amenity; placemaking; light projection  
  Abstract In this paper, we explore how a light projection sought to convey a range of qualities: conviviality, a sense of place, playfulness, defamiliarisation, and the affective and sensory capacities that were experienced through walking in the distinctive, liminal realm of Bendigo Creek in Victoria, Australia. The projection aspired to solicit a sensory and affective empathy that chimed with the experiences of an earlier event in which dozens of pedestrians were filmed walking in the creek. The projection contributed to a local campaign to reappraise the much‐maligned creek as a local public amenity. We discuss the productive potential of solitary and collective walking and, subsequently, the attributes of the projection in its static and mobile manifestation. In so doing, we suggest that publicly engaged, inclusive, creative practice can offer potent place‐making possibilities.  
  Address School of Geography, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria, Australia; t.edensor(at)mmu.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1745-5863 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2435  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Walker II, W.H.; Meléndez‐Fernández, O.H.; Nelson, R.J.; Reiter, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Global climate change and invariable photoperiods: A mismatch that jeopardizes animal fitness Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol  
  Volume 9 Issue 17 Pages 10044-10054  
  Keywords Animals; Review; Photoperiod  
  Abstract The Earth's surface temperature is rising, and precipitation patterns throughout the Earth are changing; the source of these shifts is likely anthropogenic in nature. Alterations in temperature and precipitation have obvious direct and indirect effects on both plants and animals. Notably, changes in temperature and precipitation alone can have both advantageous and detrimental consequences depending on the species. Typically, production of offspring is timed to coincide with optimal food availability; thus, individuals of many species display annual rhythms of reproductive function. Because it requires substantial time to establish or re‐establish reproductive function, individuals cannot depend on the arrival of seasonal food availability to begin breeding; thus, mechanisms have evolved in many plants and animals to monitor and respond to day length in order to anticipate seasonal changes in the environment. Over evolutionary time, there has been precise fine‐tuning of critical photoperiod and onset/offset of seasonal adaptations. Climate change has provoked changes in the availability of insects and plants which shifts the timing of optimal reproduction. However, adaptations to the stable photoperiod may be insufficiently plastic to allow a shift in the seasonal timing of bird and mammal breeding. Coupled with the effects of light pollution which prevents these species from determining day length, climate change presents extreme evolutionary pressure that can result in severe deleterious consequences for individual species reproduction and survival. This review describes the effects of climate change on plants and animals, defines photoperiod and the physiological events it regulates, and addresses the consequences of global climate change and a stable photoperiod.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA; William.Walker2(at)hsc.wvu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2619  
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