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Author Walker II, W.H.; Meléndez‐Fernández, O.H.; Nelson, R.J.; Reiter, R.J.
Title Global climate change and invariable photoperiods: A mismatch that jeopardizes animal fitness Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol
Volume 9 Issue 17 Pages 10044-10054
Keywords Animals; Review; Photoperiod
Abstract The Earth's surface temperature is rising, and precipitation patterns throughout the Earth are changing; the source of these shifts is likely anthropogenic in nature. Alterations in temperature and precipitation have obvious direct and indirect effects on both plants and animals. Notably, changes in temperature and precipitation alone can have both advantageous and detrimental consequences depending on the species. Typically, production of offspring is timed to coincide with optimal food availability; thus, individuals of many species display annual rhythms of reproductive function. Because it requires substantial time to establish or re‐establish reproductive function, individuals cannot depend on the arrival of seasonal food availability to begin breeding; thus, mechanisms have evolved in many plants and animals to monitor and respond to day length in order to anticipate seasonal changes in the environment. Over evolutionary time, there has been precise fine‐tuning of critical photoperiod and onset/offset of seasonal adaptations. Climate change has provoked changes in the availability of insects and plants which shifts the timing of optimal reproduction. However, adaptations to the stable photoperiod may be insufficiently plastic to allow a shift in the seasonal timing of bird and mammal breeding. Coupled with the effects of light pollution which prevents these species from determining day length, climate change presents extreme evolutionary pressure that can result in severe deleterious consequences for individual species reproduction and survival. This review describes the effects of climate change on plants and animals, defines photoperiod and the physiological events it regulates, and addresses the consequences of global climate change and a stable photoperiod.
Address Department of Neuroscience, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA; William.Walker2(at)hsc.wvu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2619
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Author Jechow, A.; Hölker, F.
Title How dark is a river? Artificial light at night in aquatic systems and the need for comprehensive night‐time light measurements Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water Abbreviated Journal WIREs Water
Volume 6 Issue 6 Pages e1388
Keywords Ecology; Skyglow; Review
Abstract Freshwater ecosystems are hotspots of biodiversity. They are of major importance for humans because they provide vital ecosystem services. However, as humans tend to settle near freshwaters and coastal areas, these ecosystems are also over‐proportionally affected by anthropogenic stressors. Artificial light at night can occur as a form of environmental pollution, light pollution. Light pollution affects large areas on a worldwide scale, is growing exponentially in radiance and extent and can have diverse negative effects on flora, fauna and on human health. While the majority of ecological studies on artificial light at night covered terrestrial systems, the studies on aquatic light pollution have unraveled impact on aquatic organisms, ecosystem functions as well as land‐water‐interactions. Although monitoring of light pollution is routinely performed from space and supported by ground‐based measurements, the extent and the amount of artificial light at night affecting water bodies is still largely unknown. This information, however, is essential for the design of future laboratory and field experiments, to guide light planners and to give recommendations for light pollution regulations. We analyze this knowledge gap by reviewing night‐time light measurement techniques and discuss their current obstacles in the context of water bodies. We also provide an overview of light pollution studies in the aquatic context. Finally, we give recommendations on how comprehensive night‐time light measurements in aquatic systems, specifically in freshwater systems, should be designed in the future.
Address Ecohydrology, Leibniz‐Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany; andreas.jechow(at)gmx.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2049-1948 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2688
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Author Argys, L.M.; Averett, S.L.; Yang, M.
Title Light pollution, sleep deprivation, and infant health at birth Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Southern Economic Journal Abbreviated Journal South Econ J
Volume 87 Issue 3 Pages 849-888
Keywords Human Health; birth outcomes; light pollution; skyglow; sleep deprivation
Abstract We conduct the first study to examine the fetal health impact of light pollution based on a direct measure of skyglow, an important aspect of light pollution. Using an empirical regularity discovered in physics (called Walker's law) as an instrumental variable, we address the potential endogeneity problem associated with the skyglow variable. We find evidence of reduced birth weight, shortened gestational length, and increases in preterm births. Specifically, increased nighttime brightness, characterized by being able to see only one‐fourth to one‐third of the stars that are visible in the natural unpolluted night sky, is associated with an increase of 1.48 percentage points in the likelihood of a preterm birth. Our study adds to the literature on the impact of early‐life exposure to pollution, which so far has focused primarily on air pollution. Our study has important policy implications regarding the necessity of minimizing skyglow that is, for example, contributed by streetlights.
Address Department of Economics, Lehigh University, 621 Taylor Street, Bethlehem, PA 18015 USA; muzheyang ( at ) lehigh.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0038-4038 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3300
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Author Secondi, J.; Davranche, A.; Théry, M.; Mondy, N.; Lengagne, T.; Isaac, N.
Title Assessing the effects of artificial light at night on biodiversity across latitude – Current knowledge gaps Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Global Ecology and Biogeography Abbreviated Journal Global Ecol Biogeogr
Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 404-419
Keywords Ecology; ALAN; biogeography; exposure; global change; intertropical; latitude; light pollution
Abstract Aim

Exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) is a risk factor for organisms. Considering the spread and increasing intensity of night brightness across the globe, and the key role of light at all biological levels, alterations of ecosystems are expected. Yet, we cannot predict the severity of the effects of ALAN in several biomes because little information is available outside the temperate zone. We reviewed current knowledge and identified traits that could be targeted to fill this knowledge gap in order to contribute to the elaboration of a biogeographical framework for the study of ALAN at the global scale.

Location

Global.

Time period

Current and next decades.

Methods

We analysed the latitudinal variation in ALAN and focused on environmental factors that vary with latitude but that have been overlooked. We reviewed biological traits that exhibit latitudinal variation and depend on light and photoperiod and compiled information about the predicted changes in human demography and road networks across different world regions.

Results

Cloud cover amplifies ALAN far away from urbanized areas. Because of the higher frequency of overcast sky nights, exposure effects may be stronger both at high latitudes and across a large fraction of the intertropical zone, although at different times of the year. Intertropical biomes host the largest fraction of global biodiversity. Although currently they are not the most exposed to ALAN, their human populations are growing, and urbanized areas and road networks are expanding. Hence, ALAN could have strong ecological consequences, with cloud cover as an aggravating factor.

Perspectives

Knowledge gaps currently limit our ability to predict the effects of ALAN in different biomes. Therefore, it will be important to start investigating the consequences of this novel environmental factor across the globe, in order to develop a relevant theoretical framework.
Address UMR 5023, Université de Lyon, Écologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés, Université Lyon 1, ENTPE, Villeurbanne, France; jean.secondi ( at ) univ-angers.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1466-822X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3309
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Author Larsson, M.; Göthberg, A.; Milberg, P.
Title Night, light and flight: light attraction in Trichoptera Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Insect Conservation and Diversity Abbreviated Journal Insect Conserv Divers
Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 296-302
Keywords Animals; artificial light; biodiversity; insects; light attraction; Trichoptera
Abstract Artificial light is an important and necessary part of urban environments, but light can have substantial direct and indirect effects on populations of various organisms. Urban areas are often situated close to water and thus organisms dependent on water could be especially vulnerable. Trichoptera is one of the most abundant insect orders in freshwater, but its attraction to light has not been analysed in detail. We contrasted catches in light traps and passive traps at three locations in Sweden. The results showed that artificial light can affect Trichoptera populations. Attraction to light varied between Trichoptera species and females were more attracted than males. Day‐, evening‐ and especially night‐active species were all attracted to light. Light catches of day‐ and evening‐active Trichoptera could partly be a consequence of atypical flight activity, i.e. they are deceived to take flight when a lamp is lit during night. In all, artificial light can alter Trichoptera populations, sex ratios and species composition. This impact should be considered when erecting and managing light sources near waterways.
Address IFM Biology, Conservation Ecology Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; permi ( at ) ifm.liu.se
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1752-458X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3391
Permanent link to this record