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Author Simoneau, A.; Aubé, M.; Leblanc, J.; Boucher, R.; Roby, J.; Lacharité, F.
Title PSFs for mapping artificial night sky luminance over large territories Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Skyglow; light pollution; simulations; atmospheric effects; radiative transfer; numerical methods; site testing
Abstract Knowledge of the night sky radiance over a large territory may be valuable information to identify sites appropriate to astronomical observations or for asserting the impacts of artificial light at night on ecosystems. Measuring the sky radiance can be a complex endeavour depending on the desired temporal and spatial resolution. Similarly, modelling of artificial night sky radiance for multiple points of a territory can represent a significant amount of computing time depending on the complexity of the model used. We suggest performing modelling of

the sky radiance over large territories using the convolution of a transfer function determined with the radiative transfer model Illumina v2. The transfer functions are used as Point Spread Functions of single light sources over a complex light source geographical distributions. The main contributions of our work are to determine how the Point Spread Function is sensitive to the main driving parameters of the artificial night sky radiance such as the wavelength, the ground reflectance, the obstacles properties, the Upward Light Output Ratio and the Aerosol Optical Depth. The method is applied to the territory of the Mont-Mégantic International Dark Sky Reserve in Canada. We repeated the experiment for winter and summer conditions and compared the maps to the New world atlas of artificial night sky brightness, to different setup of the Illumina v2 model and to in situ Sky Quality Camera measurements. The typical errors associated with the method were evaluated.
Address Département de géomatique appliquée, Université de Sherbrooke, 2500 Boul. de l’Université, Sherbrooke, J1K 2R1, Canada; martin.aube ( at ) cegepsherbrooke.qc.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Astronomical Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3301
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Author Argys, L.M.; Averett, S.L.; Yang, M.
Title Light pollution, sleep deprivation, and infant health at birth Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Southern Economic Journal Abbreviated Journal South Econ J
Volume 87 Issue 3 Pages 849-888
Keywords Human Health; birth outcomes; light pollution; skyglow; sleep deprivation
Abstract We conduct the first study to examine the fetal health impact of light pollution based on a direct measure of skyglow, an important aspect of light pollution. Using an empirical regularity discovered in physics (called Walker's law) as an instrumental variable, we address the potential endogeneity problem associated with the skyglow variable. We find evidence of reduced birth weight, shortened gestational length, and increases in preterm births. Specifically, increased nighttime brightness, characterized by being able to see only one‐fourth to one‐third of the stars that are visible in the natural unpolluted night sky, is associated with an increase of 1.48 percentage points in the likelihood of a preterm birth. Our study adds to the literature on the impact of early‐life exposure to pollution, which so far has focused primarily on air pollution. Our study has important policy implications regarding the necessity of minimizing skyglow that is, for example, contributed by streetlights.
Address Department of Economics, Lehigh University, 621 Taylor Street, Bethlehem, PA 18015 USA; muzheyang ( at ) lehigh.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0038-4038 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3300
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Author Masana, E.; Carrasco, J.M.; Bará, S.; Ribas, S.J.
Title A multiband map of the natural night sky brightness including Gaia and Hipparcos integrated starlight Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 501 Issue 4 Pages 5443-5456
Keywords Instrumentation; night sky brightness; radiative transfer; scattering; atmospheric effects; photometers; light pollution; site testing
Abstract The natural night sky brightness is a relevant input for monitoring the light pollution evolution at observatory sites, by subtracting it from the overall sky brightness determined by direct measurements. It is also instrumental for assessing the expected darkness of the pristine night skies. The natural brightness of the night sky is determined by the sum of the spectral radiances coming from astrophysical sources, including zodiacal light, and the atmospheric airglow. The resulting radiance is modified by absorption and scattering before it reaches the observer. Therefore, the natural night sky brightness is a function of the location, time, and atmospheric conditions. We present in this work the GAia Map of the Brightness Of the Natural Sky (GAMBONS), a model to map the natural night brightness of the sky in cloudless and moonless nights. Unlike previous maps, GAMBONS is based on the extra-atmospheric star radiance obtained from the Gaia catalogue. The Gaia-Data Release 2 (DR2) archive compiles astrometric and photometric information for more than 1.6 billion stars up to G = 21 mag. For the brightest stars, not included in Gaia-DR2, we have used the Hipparcos catalogue instead. After adding up to the star radiance the contributions of the diffuse galactic and extragalactic light, zodiacal light and airglow, and taking into account the effects of atmospheric attenuation and scattering, the radiance detected by ground-based observers can be estimated. This methodology can be applied to any photometric band, if appropriate transformations from the Gaia bands are available. In particular, we present the expected sky brightness for V (Johnson), and visual photopic and scotopic passbands.
Address Departament Física Quàntica i Astrofìsica, Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC-UB-IEEC), C Martí Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain; emasana ( at ) fqa.ub.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3299
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Author Wang, G.; Vega-Rodriguez, J.; Diabate, A.; Liu, J.; Cui, C.; Nignan, C.; Dong, L.; Li, F.; Ouedrago, C.O.; Bandaogo, A.M.; Sawadogo, P.S.; Maiga, H.; Alves E Silva, T.L.; Pascini, T.V.; Wang, S.; Jacobs-Lorena, M.
Title Clock genes and environmental cues coordinate Anopheles pheromone synthesis, swarming, and mating Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 371 Issue 6527 Pages 411-415
Keywords Animals; Mosquitos
Abstract Anopheles mating is initiated by the swarming of males at dusk followed by females flying into the swarm. Here, we show that mosquito swarming and mating are coordinately guided by clock genes, light, and temperature. Transcriptome analysis shows up-regulation of the clock genes period (per) and timeless (tim) in the head of field-caught swarming Anopheles coluzzii males. Knockdown of per and tim expression affects Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles stephensi male mating in the laboratory, and it reduces male An. coluzzii swarming and mating under semifield conditions. Light and temperature affect mosquito mating, possibly by modulating per and/or tim expression. Moreover, the desaturase gene desat1 is up-regulated and rhythmically expressed in the heads of swarming males and regulates the production of cuticular hydrocarbons, including heptacosane, which stimulates mating activity.
Address Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Malaria Research Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA. sbwang@cemps.ac.cn ljacob13@jhu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33479155 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3298
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Author Glennon, M.J.; Kretser, H.E.
Title Exurbia East and West: Responses of Bird Communities to Low Density Residential Development in Two North American Regions Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Diversity Abbreviated Journal Diversity
Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 42
Keywords Animals
Abstract Exurban development is a prevalent cause of habitat loss and alteration throughout the globe and is a common land-use pattern in areas of high natural amenity value. We investigated the response of bird communities to exurban development in two contrasting North American regions, the Adirondack Park (New York) in the eastern US, and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Montana) in the Rocky Mountain West. We combined social and ecological data collection methods to compare the effects of exurban development on avian communities between the two landscapes, and, in exurban residential areas within them, to compare the relative roles of habitat structure, resource provisioning, and human disturbance in influencing avian habitat use. Contrasting with an earlier pilot study, we found differential effects of exurban development in the two regions, with birds generally more responsive in the Adirondack Park. Characteristics of habitat context and structure had larger influences on bird habitat use than human-associated resource provisioning or disturbance in both landscapes. The smaller magnitude and high variability in the responses of birds to landowner stewardship and/or disturbance suggest that broader geographical factors are highly important and that careful siting of developments on the landscape may be more successful at protecting wildlife communities than attempts to influence the behaviors of their inhabitants once built.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-2818 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3297
Permanent link to this record