|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Jones, R.R.
Title Exposure to artificial light at night and risk of cancer: where do we go from here? Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract Despite experimental and mechanistic data suggesting circadian disruption's role in carcinogenesis, mixed findings from epidemiological investigations of artificial light at night and cancer risk in the general population are difficult to interpret due to exposure assessment limitations. It will be important for future studies to assess and validate individual-level exposures, ideally over the lifetime.
Address Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD, 20895, USA. rena.jones@nih.gov
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33483586 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3296
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Höhn, C.; Schmid, S.R.; Plamberger, C.P.; Bothe, K.; Angerer, M.; Gruber, G.; Pletzer, B.; Hoedlmoser, K.
Title Preliminary Results: The Impact of Smartphone Use and Short-Wavelength Light during the Evening on Circadian Rhythm, Sleep and Alertness Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 66-86
Keywords Human health
Abstract Smartphone usage strongly increased in the last decade, especially before bedtime. There is growing evidence that short-wavelength light affects hormonal secretion, thermoregulation, sleep and alertness. Whether blue light filters can attenuate these negative effects is still not clear. Therefore, here, we present preliminary data of 14 male participants (21.93 ± 2.17 years), who spent three nights in the sleep laboratory, reading 90 min either on a smartphone (1) with or (2) without a blue light filter, or (3) on printed material before bedtime. Subjective sleepiness was decreased during reading on a smartphone, but no effects were present on evening objective alertness in a GO/NOGO task. Cortisol was elevated in the morning after reading on the smartphone without a filter, which resulted in a reduced cortisol awakening response. Evening melatonin and nightly vasodilation (i.e., distal-proximal skin temperature gradient) were increased after reading on printed material. Early slow wave sleep/activity and objective alertness in the morning were only reduced after reading without a filter. These results indicate that short-wavelength light affects not only circadian rhythm and evening sleepiness but causes further effects on sleep physiology and alertness in the morning. Using a blue light filter in the evening partially reduces these negative effects.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3295
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Villarroya-Villalba, L.; Casanelles-Abella, J.; Moretti, M.; Pinho, P.; Samson, R.; Van Mensel, A.; Chiron, F.; Zellweger, F.; Obrist, M.K.
Title Response of bats and nocturnal insects to urban green areas in Europe Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Remote sensing
Abstract Animal biodiversity in cities is generally expected to be uniformly reduced, but recent studies show that this is modulated by the composition and configuration of Urban Green Areas (UGAs). UGAs represent a heterogeneous network of vegetated spaces in urban settings that have repeatedly shown to support a significant part of native diurnal animal biodiversity. However, nocturnal taxa have so far been understudied, constraining our understanding of the role of UGAs on maintaining ecological connectivity and enhancing overall biodiversity. We present a well-replicated multi-city study on the factors driving bat and nocturnal insect biodiversity in three European cities. To achieve this, we sampled bats with ultrasound recorders and flying insects with light traps during the summer of 2018. Results showed a greater abundance and diversity of bats and nocturnal insects in the city of Zurich, followed by Antwerp and Paris. We identified artificial lighting in the UGA to lower bat diversity by probably filtering out light-sensitive species. We also found a negative correlation between both bat activity and diversity and insect abundance, suggesting a top-down control. An in-depth analysis of the Zurich data revealed divergent responses of the nocturnal fauna to landscape variables, while pointing out a bottom-up control of insect diversity on bats. Thus, to effectively preserve biodiversity in urban environments, UGAs management decisions should take into account the combined ecological needs of bats and nocturnal insects and consider the specific spatial topology of UGAs in each city.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3294
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fyie, L.R.; Gardiner, M.M.; Meuti, M.E.
Title Artificial light at night alters the seasonal responses of biting mosquitoes Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Journal of Insect Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Insect Physiol
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals; Culex pipiens; Light pollution; Northern house mosquito; diapause; urbanization
Abstract Urban light pollution caused by artificial light at night (ALAN) profoundly affects the ecology, behavior, and physiology of plants and animals. Further, this widespread environmental pollutant has the potential to negatively impact human and animal health by changing the seasonal dynamics of disease-transmitting insects. In response to short days, females of the Northern house mosquito enter an overwintering dormancy, or diapause. While in diapause, female mosquitoes divert energy away from reproduction, cease blood-feeding, and no longer transmit disease. We demonstrate that exposure to dim ALAN ( approximately 4 lux) causes female mosquitoes to avert diapause and become reproductively active, as these females acquired less fat content, developed larger egg follicles, imbibed vertebrate blood, and produced viable eggs and larvae. Our findings suggest that mosquitoes in highly light-polluted areas such as cities may be actively reproducing and biting later in the season, thereby extending the period of disease risk for urban residents. Our results suggest that ALAN should be considered when modeling mosquito abundance, disease risk, and when deciding how long mosquito surveillance and control should persist in temperate regions.
Address The Ohio State University, Department of Entomology, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-1910 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33482172 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3293
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Barré, K.; Kerbiriou, C.; Ing, R.-K.; Bas, Y.; Azam, C.; Le Viol, I.; Spoelstra, K.
Title Bats seek refuge in cluttered environment when exposed to white and red lights at night Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Movement Ecology Abbreviated Journal Mov Ecol
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 3
Keywords Animals; Acoustic localization; Artificial light; Chiroptera; Flight behaviour; Microphone array; Streetlight
Abstract BACKGROUND: Artificial light at night is recognized as an increasing threat to biodiversity. However, information on the way highly mobile taxa such as bats spatially respond to light is limited. Following the hypothesis of a behavioural adaptation to the perceived risks of predation, we hypothesised that bats should avoid lit areas by shifting their flight route to less exposed conditions. METHODS: Using 3D acoustic localization at four experimentally illuminated sites, we studied how the distance to streetlights emitting white and red light affected the Probability of bats Flying Inside the Forest (PFIF) versus along the forest edge. RESULTS: We show that open-, edge-, and narrow-space foraging bats strongly change flight patterns by increasing PFIF when getting closer to white and red streetlights placed in the forest edge. These behavioural changes occurred mainly on the streetlight side where light was directed. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that bats cope with light exposure by actively seeking refuge in cluttered environment, potentially due to involved predation risks. This is a clear indication that bats make use of landscape structures when reacting to light, and shows the potential of vegetation and streetlight orientation in mitigating effects of light. The study nevertheless calls for preserving darkness as the most efficient way.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), PO Box 50, 6700 AB, Wageningen, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2051-3933 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33482918; PMCID:PMC7821510 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3292
Permanent link to this record