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Author Lu, D.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Su, K.; Zhang, H.; Li, Y.
Title Modeling Spatiotemporal Population Changes by Integrating DMSP-OLS and NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Data in Chongqing, China Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 284
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The sustained growth of non-farm wages has led to large-scale migration of rural population to cities in China, especially in mountainous areas. It is of great significance to study the spatial and temporal pattern of population migration mentioned above for guiding population spatial optimization and the effective supply of public services in the mountainous areas. Here, we determined the spatiotemporal evolution of population in the Chongqing municipality of China from 2000–2018 by employing multi-period spatial distribution data, including nighttime light (NTL) data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS). There was a power function relationship between the two datasets at the pixel scale, with a mean relative error of NTL integration of 8.19%, 4.78% less than achieved by a previous study at the provincial scale. The spatial simulations of population distribution achieved a mean relative error of 26.98%, improved the simulation accuracy for mountainous population by nearly 20% and confirmed the feasibility of this method in Chongqing. During the study period, the spatial distribution of Chongqing’s population has increased in the west and decreased in the east, while also increased in low-altitude areas and decreased in medium-high altitude areas. Population agglomeration was common in all of districts and counties and the population density of central urban areas and its surrounding areas significantly increased, while that of non-urban areas such as northeast Chongqing significantly decreased.
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Corporate Author Thesis
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3285
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Author Zheng, Q.; Weng, Q.; Wang, K.
Title Characterizing urban land changes of 30 global megacities using nighttime light time series stacks Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing
Volume 173 Issue Pages 10-23
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Worldwide urbanization has brought about diverse types of urban land use and land cover (LULC) changes. The diversity of urban land changes, however, have been greatly under studied, since the major focus of past research has been on urban growth. In this study, we proposed a framework to characterize diverse urban land changes of 30 global megacities using monthly nighttime light time series from VIIRS data. First, we developed a Logistic-Harmonic model to fit VIIRS time series. Second, by leveraging the uniqueness of urban land change and nighttime light data, we incorporated temporal information of VIIRS time series and proposed a new classification scheme to produce monthly maps of built-up areas and to disentangle urban land changes into five categories. Third, we provided an in-depth analysis and comparison of urban land change patterns of the selected megacities. Results demonstrated that the Logistic-Harmonic model yielded a robust performance in fitting VIIRS time series. Temporal features based classification can not only significantly improve the mapping accuracy of built-up areas, especially for regions with heterogeneous built-up and non-built-up landscapes, but also promoted temporal consistency and classification efficiency. Urban land changes occurred in 51% of the built-up pixels of the megacities. Compared with urban growth, other types of urban land change, particularly land use intensification, contributed to an unexpectedly large proportion of the changes (83%). The findings of this study offer an insightful understanding on global urbanization processes in megacities, and evoke further investigation on the environmental and ecological implications of urban land changes.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0924-2716 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3284
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Author Jaynes, D.; Switzer, P.
Title Nighttime Blue Light Exposure and Breast Cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Osteopathic Family Physician Abbreviated Journal
Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 30-33
Keywords Review; Human Health
Abstract The purpose of this article is to provide background information and the current understanding of a less familiar cause of female breast cancer; exposure to ultraviolet light at night. Breast cancer is a common disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality in women. There are several risk factors for breast cancer, most of which are genetic and environmental in nature. An often-overlooked risk factor is exposure to blue light during night shift work, which decreases melatonin production. One of the many cancer-preventing properties of melatonin is to limit estrogen production. Increased lifetime exposure to estrogen is a well-known cause of breast cancer. Awareness of nighttime blue light exposure as a breast cancer risk factor by women doing night shift work and those exposed to nighttime light via smartphones and laptops, is essential information to know so that protective measures can be taken.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3283
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Author Ustaoglu, E.; Bovkır, R.; Aydınoglu, A.C.
Title Spatial distribution of GDP based on integrated NPS-VIIRS nighttime light and MODIS EVI data: a case study of Turkey Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environment, Development and Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Environ Dev Sustain
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Satellite-derived nighttime light data have been increasingly used as a proxy measure for investigating economic activity. However, there are few studies focusing on the spatialised mapping of the GDP at pixel level and further analysis of the economic differences in agricultural and non-agricultural sectors for the different regions using the VIIRS-NPP data. This paper aims to fill this gap in the literature through developing a pixel-level agricultural and non-agricultural GDP map for Turkey in 2015 by combining the VIIRS-NPP nighttime imagery, Terra MODIS-Enhanced Vegetation Index, and land use/cover data from CORINE. The inclusion of vegetation indices and land cover data would significantly improve the estimates of sectorial GDP for Turkey where agriculture is one of the dominating sectors in the Country. GDP density map offers a significant database for both researchers and policy makers in the analysis of regional economic dynamics that will assist in formulating sustainable regional growth strategies.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3282
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Author Rodríguez, A.; Orozco-Valor, P.M.; Sarasola, J.H.
Title Artificial light at night as a driver of urban colonization by an avian predator Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol
Volume 36 Issue 1 Pages 17-27
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract Context

Urbanization and artificial light at night (ALAN) are major drivers of local biodiversity losses causing community alterations, disruption of predator-prey interactions, and ultimately, promotion of cascading effects. However, some species can colonize urban environments.

Objectives

We explore the role of ALAN as a driver of the colonization of urban environments by a nocturnal avian predator, the burrowing owl Athene cunicularia.

Methods

We studied in a suburban locality in La Pampa, Argentina: (1) prey availability with pitfall traps under streetlights and control sites; (2) diet by analyzing pellets; (3) space use by deploying GPS data-loggers to breeding owls; (4) nesting habitat selection by comparing environmental variables at nest and random locations; and (5) productivity by correlating environmental variables with the number of fledglings.

Results

First, streetlights altered the invertebrate availability, attracting them to illuminated areas. Second, the owl diet was more similar to the invertebrate taxa trapped at pitfall traps under streetlights than that in control traps. Third, owl space use was determined by streetlights. Owls spent more time around light sources, particularly during the nighttime. Fourth, the most important habitat feature influencing the nesting habitat selection was the distance to streetlight. Owls selected areas close to streetlights for nesting. Finally, productivity was not explained by any of our habitat variables.

Conclusions

We demonstrate that ALAN alters the availability of invertebrates and plays a role in the diet, space use, and occupation of urban burrowing owls. Streetlights increase foraging efficiency for owls due to the clumping of prey attracted to lights. This predator-prey relationship might be only supported in suburban environments where low urbanization levels let burrowing owls nest in bare ground areas, and invertebrates are attracted to ALAN from surrounding wilder areas.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3281
Permanent link to this record