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Author Lin, H.; Luo, S.; Huang, Y.
Title Poverty estimation at the county level by combining LuoJia1-01 nighttime light data and points of interest Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Geocarto International Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract To reduce poverty, it is important to obtain accurate information on poverty conditions in a timely manner. Previous studies indicated that nighttime light products are helpful for poverty estimation. However, there exist no studies that have investigated the potential of LuoJia1-01, a new-generation nighttime light satellite with a much finer resolution (∼130 m), for analyzing poverty. In addition, nighttime light data may not reflect daytime-only socio-economic activities. To address these problems, our study first compared the performance of LuoJia1-01 and NPP-VIIRS products in poverty estimation. Next, we incorporated point of interest (POI) information so that daytime-only socio-economic activities can be considered. Our experiments indicated that LuoJia1-01 performs slightly better than NPP-VIIRS in terms of poverty estimation at county level. More importantly, we revealed that the combination of POIs and nighttime light products can moderately increase the average estimation accuracies. These findings are expected to support poverty monitoring over large regions for long periods, which cannot be fulfilled by traditional household surveys and census.
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Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3355
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Author Zhang, D.; Jones, R.R.; James, P.; Kitahara, C.M.; Xiao, Q.
Title Associations between artificial light at night and risk for thyroid cancer: A large US cohort study Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Cancer Abbreviated Journal Cancer
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; circadian disruption; light at night; melatonin; prospective cohort; thyroid cancer
Abstract BACKGROUND: Light at night (LAN) inhibits nighttime secretion of melatonin and may cause circadian disruption, which may be a risk factor for cancer. Recent studies have linked high LAN exposure with elevated breast cancer risk. Given that breast cancer may share a common hormone-dependent etiology with thyroid cancer and that circadian rhythms play a role in regulating thyroid function, the authors hypothesized that exposure to LAN is positively associated with thyroid cancer incidence. METHODS: This study examined the association between LAN and thyroid cancer incidence in the National Institutes of Health-American Association of Retired Persons Diet and Health Study. LAN exposure was estimated from satellite data and was linked to residential addresses at the baseline. Incident thyroid cancer cases were ascertained via linkage to state cancer registries. Cox regression was used to determine the relationship between LAN and thyroid cancer risk, with adjustments made for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and other environmental factors. RESULTS: Among 464,371 participants, a positive association was found between LAN and thyroid cancer risk. Specifically, in comparison with the lowest quintile of LAN, the highest quintile was associated with a 55% increase in risk (hazard ratio [HR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-2.02). The association was primarily driven by papillary thyroid cancer and was stronger in women (HR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.26-2.60) than men (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.86-1.94). In women, the association was stronger for localized cancer, whereas in men, the association was stronger for a more advanced stage. Results were consistent across different tumor sizes. CONCLUSIONS: LAN was positively associated with thyroid cancer risk. Future studies are needed to confirm this association and identify underlying biological mechanisms.
Address Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas
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ISSN 0008-543X ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:33554351 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3354
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Author Kitahashi, T.; Kurokawa, D.; Ogiso, S.; Suzuki, N.; Ando, H.
Title Light-induced and circadian expressions of melanopsin genes opn4xa and opn4xb in the eyes of juvenile grass puffer Takifugu alboplumbeus Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Fish Physiology and Biochemistry Abbreviated Journal Fish Physiol Biochem
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Biological clock; Circadian rhythm; Diurnal rhythm; Light; Melanopsin; Photoreceptor
Abstract Animals regulate a variety of aspects of physiology according to environmental light conditions via nonvisual opsins such as melanopsin. In order to study photic regulation of fish physiology, expression changes of the genes for melanopsin (opn4xa and opn4xb) and effects of light on them were examined in juvenile grass puffer Takifugu alboplumbeus using quantitative real-time PCR. In the brain of juvenile fish, no significant diurnal nor circadian changes were observed in opn4x mRNA levels. On the other hand, in the eyes, the mRNA level of opn4xa showed a significant diurnal rhythm with a peak at Zeitgeber time (ZT) 4, while no apparent circadian changes were observed. The mRNA level of opn4xb in the eyes showed a diurnal change similar to that of opn4xa, while it showed a significant circadian change. Furthermore, continuous exposure to light during a subjective night significantly increased the mRNA levels of opn4xa in the eyes at ZT24, suggesting that light induces gene expression of opn4xa in the eyes and that the induction occurs only during the night-day transition period. These results suggest that Opn4xa and Opn4xb play differential roles in the eyes of juvenile grass puffer to mediate the physiological effects of environmental light information.
Address Sado Marine Biological Station, Sado Island Center for Ecological Sustainability, Niigata University, 87 Tassha, Sado-shi, Niigata, 952-2135, Japan
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0920-1742 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33559801 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3353
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Author Rajput, S.; Naithani, M.; Meena, K.; Rana, S.
Title Light pollution: hidden perils in light and links to cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Sleep Vigilance Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Review; Human Health
Abstract Light pollution is a rising global concern which impacts not only ecology but has a wide range of deleterious effect on human health as well. Artificial light at night (ALAN) has been linked to increased risk of cancers including shift workers at night. Apart from cancer, ALAN has been the cause of disrupted circadian rhythm, disturbances in sleep pattern, obesity, stress, alterations in the rhythmicity of gut microbiota and free radical damage. Melatonin, a wonder molecule dubbed as the hormone of darkness, appears to be involved in a plethora of physiological processes and abnormalities including control of sleep, circadian rhythms, retinal physiology, seasonal reproductive cycles, cancer development and growth, immune activity, antioxidation and free radical scavenging. Potential detrimental effects of artificial light are not known to all, hidden perils of light are yet to be brought in full public knowledge so that nighttime light can be dealt with effectively.
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Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3352
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Author Lang, W.; Pan, M.; Wu, J.; Chen, T.; Li, X.
Title The patterns and driving forces of uneven regional growth in ASEAN countries: A tale of two Thailands' path toward regional coordinated development Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Growth and Change Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Uneven development has long been a critical issue in geography and urban studies, leading to economically inefficient urbanization, environmentally unbalanced regions, and socially unequal livelihoods. As one result, primate cities and urban primacy form within a hierarchical urban system, to which urban and regional planning must positively respond. It is worth noting that Thailand has experienced a number of important urbanization issues related to developing countries, such as semicolonialism and internal colonialism. This study aims to investigate regional uneven development based on primacy theory and the rank‐size rule, which are common in most Asian and developing countries. We examined the urbanization processes in Thailand, from 2000 to 2015, by looking at factors of population, GDP, land use, transportation networks, and nighttime light, which provide very recent regional development patterns. The second set of analyses explained the degree of primacy among different provinces and their ranking hierarchies. By presenting the persistent disparities of contemporary urbanization in Thailand and exploring its driving forces, this study offers insights into planning and policy and underscores the importance of regional coordinated development for achieving sustainable urbanization in Southeast Asian countries.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3351
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