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Author Gaster, L. openurl 
  Title Modern methods of artificial illumination; Part III: High-pressure gas lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 1909 Publication Journal of the Royal Society of Arts Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 57 Issue Pages 795-810  
  Keywords Lighting; Technology  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3333  
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Author Zheng, Q.; Teo, H.C.; Koh, L.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night Advances Spring Phenology in the United States Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 399  
  Keywords Plants; Remote sensing  
  Abstract Plant phenology is closely related to light availability as diurnal and seasonal cycles are essential environmental cues for organizing bio-ecological processes. The natural cycles of light, however, have been dramatically disrupted by artificial light at night (ALAN) due to recent urbanization. The influence on plant phenology of ALAN and its spatial variation remain largely unknown. By analyzing satellite data on ALAN intensity across the United States, here, we showed that ALAN tended to advance the start date of the growing season (SOS), although the overall response of SOS to ALAN was relatively weak compared with other potential factors (e.g., preseason temperature). The phenological impact of ALAN showed a spatially divergent pattern, whereby ALAN mainly advanced SOS at climatically moderate regions within the United States (e.g., Virginia), while its effect was insignificant or even reversed at very cold (e.g., Minnesota) and hot regions (e.g., Florida). Such a divergent pattern was mainly attributable to its high sensitivity to chilling insufficiency, where the advancing effect on SOS was only triggered on the premise that chilling days exceeded a certain threshold. Other mechanisms may also play a part, such as the interplay among chilling, forcing and photoperiod and the difference in species life strategies. Besides, urban areas and natural ecosystems were found to suffer from similar magnitudes of influence from ALAN, albeit with a much higher baseline ALAN intensity in urban areas. Our findings shed new light on the phenological impact of ALAN and its relation to space and other environmental cues, which is beneficial to a better understanding and projection of phenology changes under a warming and urbanizing future.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3332  
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Author Kwarteng, E.V.S.; Andam-Akorful, S.A.; Kwarteng, A.; Asare, D.-C.B.; Quaye-Ballard, J.A.; Osei, F.B.; Duker, A.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spatial variation in lymphatic filariasis risk factors of hotspot zones in Ghana Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 230  
  Keywords Remote sensing; Ecological niche modelling; Ensemble modelling; Generalised boosted model (GBM); Lymphatic filariasis; Machine learning; Random forest (RF)  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Lymphatic Filariasis (LF), a parasitic nematode infection, poses a huge economic burden to affected countries. LF endemicity is localized and its prevalence is spatially heterogeneous. In Ghana, there exists differences in LF prevalence and multiplicity of symptoms in the country's northern and southern parts. Species distribution models (SDMs) have been utilized to explore the suite of risk factors that influence the transmission of LF in these geographically distinct regions. METHODS: Presence-absence records of microfilaria (mf) cases were stratified into northern and southern zones and used to run SDMs, while climate, socioeconomic, and land cover variables provided explanatory information. Generalized Linear Model (GLM), Generalized Boosted Model (GBM), Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Surface Range Envelope (SRE), Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), and Random Forests (RF) algorithms were run for both study zones and also for the entire country for comparison. RESULTS: Best model quality was obtained with RF and GBM algorithms with the highest Area under the Curve (AUC) of 0.98 and 0.95, respectively. The models predicted high suitable environments for LF transmission in the short grass savanna (northern) and coastal (southern) areas of Ghana. Mainly, land cover and socioeconomic variables such as proximity to inland water bodies and population density uniquely influenced LF transmission in the south. At the same time, poor housing was a distinctive risk factor in the north. Precipitation, temperature, slope, and poverty were common risk factors but with subtle variations in response values, which were confirmed by the countrywide model. CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated that different variable combinations influence the occurrence of lymphatic filariasis in northern and southern Ghana. Thus, an understanding of the geographic distinctness in risk factors is required to inform on the development of area-specific transmission control systems towards LF elimination in Ghana and internationally.  
  Address Department of Geomatic Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33509140; PMCID:PMC7841995 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3331  
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Author Avtar, R.; Kouser, A.; Kumar, A.; Singh, D.; Misra, P.; Gupta, A.; Yunus, A.P.; Kumar, P.; Johnson, B.A.; Dasgupta, R.; Sahu, N.; Besse Rimba, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Remote Sensing for International Peace and Security: Its Role and Implications Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 439  
  Keywords Review; Remote sensing  
  Abstract Remote sensing technology has seen a massive rise in popularity over the last two decades, becoming an integral part of our lives. Space-based satellite technologies facilitated access to the inaccessible terrains, helped humanitarian teams, support complex emergencies, and contributed to monitoring and verifying conflict zones. The scoping phase of this review investigated the utility of the role of remote sensing application to complement international peace and security activities owing to their ability to provide objective near real-time insights at the ground level. The first part of this review looks into the major research concepts and implementation of remote sensing-based techniques for international peace and security applications and presented a meta-analysis on how advanced sensor capabilities can support various aspects of peace and security. With key examples, we demonstrated how this technology assemblage enacts multiple versions of peace and security: for refugee relief operations, in armed conflicts monitoring, tracking acts of genocide, providing evidence in courts of law, and assessing contravention in human rights. The second part of this review anticipates future challenges that can hinder the applicative capabilities of remote sensing in peace and security. Varying types of sensors pose discrepancies in image classifications and issues like cost, resolution, and difficulty of ground-truth in conflict areas. With emerging technologies and sufficient secondary resources available, remote sensing plays a vital operational tool in conflict-affected areas by supporting an extensive diversity in public policy actions for peacekeeping processes.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3330  
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Author Helfrich-Förster, C.; Monecke, S.; Spiousas, I.; Hovestadt, T.; Mitesser, O.; Wehr, T.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Women temporarily synchronize their menstrual cycles with the luminance and gravimetric cycles of the Moon Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Sci. Adv.  
  Volume 7 Issue 5 Pages eabe1358  
  Keywords Human Health; moonlight  
  Abstract Many species synchronize reproductive behavior with a particular phase of the lunar cycle to increase reproductive success. In humans, a lunar influence on reproductive behavior remains controversial, although the human menstrual cycle has a period close to that of the lunar cycle. Here, we analyzed long-term menstrual recordings of individual women with distinct methods for biological rhythm analysis. We show that women’s menstrual cycles with a period longer than 27 days were intermittently synchronous with the Moon’s luminance and/or gravimetric cycles. With age and upon exposure to artificial nocturnal light, menstrual cycles shortened and lost this synchrony. We hypothesize that in ancient times, human reproductive behavior was synchronous with the Moon but that our modern lifestyles have changed reproductive physiology and behavior.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3329  
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