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Author Vowles, A.S.; Kemp, P.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night (ALAN) affects the downstream movement behaviour of the critically endangered European eel, Anguilla anguilla Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is considered one of the most pervasive forms of environmental pollution. It is an emerging threat to freshwater biodiversity and can influence ecologically important behaviours of fish. The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is a critically endangered catadromous species that migrates downstream to the ocean to spawn in the Sargasso Sea. Given the pervasive nature of ALAN, many eel will navigate through artificially lit routes during their seaward migration, and although considered negatively phototactic, their response has yet to be quantified. We investigated the response of downstream moving European eel to simulated ALAN using a Light Emitting Diode unit in an experimental flume. We presented two routes of passage under: (1) a dark control (both channels unlit), (2) low ALAN (treatment channel lit to ca. 5 lx), or (3) high ALAN (treatment channel lit to ca. 20 lx). Eel were: (i) more likely to reject an illuminated route when exposed to high levels of ALAN; (ii) less likely to select the illuminated channel when given a choice; and (iii) passed downstream more rapidly when the illuminated route was selected. This study quantified the response of the critically endangered European eel to ALAN under an experimental setting, providing the foundations for future field based research to validate these findings, and offering insight on the ecological impacts of this major environmental pollutant and driver of global change.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3313  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dominoni, D.; Smit, J.A.H.; Visser, M.E.; Halfwerk, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Multisensory pollution: Artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise have interactive effects on activity patterns of great tits (Parus major) Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 256 Issue Pages 113314  
  Keywords Animals; Behavior, physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Cities; Ecosystem; Male; Netherlands; Photoperiod; Seasons; Songbirds; Urbanization; Alan; Circadian rhythms; Great tits; Light pollution; Noise; Urbanization  
  Abstract Urbanisation is increasing globally at a rapid pace. Consequently, wild species face novel environmental stressors associated with urban sprawl, such as artificial light at night and noise. These stressors have pervasive effects on the behaviour and physiology of many species. Most studies have singled out the impact of just one of these stressors, while in the real world they are likely to co-occur both temporally and spatially, and we thus lack a clear understanding of the combined effect of anthropogenic stressors on wild species. Here, we experimentally exposed captive male great tits (Parus major) to artificial light at night and 24h noise in a fully factorial experiment. We then measured the effect of both these stressors on their own and their combination on the amount and timing of activity patterns. We found that both light and noise affected activity patterns when presented alone, but in opposite ways: light increased activity, particularly at night, while noise reduced it, particularly during the day. When the two stressors were combined, we found a synergistic effect on the total activity and the nighttime activity, but an antagonistic effect on daytime activity. The significant interaction between noise and light treatment also differed among forest and city birds. Indeed, we detected a significant interactive effect on light and noise on daytime, nighttime, dusktime and offset of activity of urban birds, but not of forest birds. These results suggest that both artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise can drive changes in activity patterns, but that the specific impacts depend on the habitat of origin. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that co-occurring exposure to noise and light can lead to a stronger impact at night than predicted from the additive effects and thus that multisensory pollution may be a considerable threat for wildlife.  
  Address Department of Ecological Science, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; davide.dominoni ( at ) glasgow.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31761596 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3312  
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Kjellberg Jensen, J.; de Jong, M.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night, in interaction with spring temperature, modulates timing of reproduction in a passerine bird Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Ecological Applications : a Publication of the Ecological Society of America Abbreviated Journal Ecol Appl  
  Volume 30 Issue 3 Pages e02062  
  Keywords Animals; Oviposition; Passeriformes; Reproduction; Seasons; Temperature; Parus major; artificial light at night; light pollution; phenology; timing of reproduction; urbanization  
  Abstract The ecological impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) on phenological events such as reproductive timing is increasingly recognized. In birds, previous experiments under controlled conditions showed that ALAN strongly advances gonadal growth, but effects on egg-laying date are less clear. In particular, effects of ALAN on timing of egg laying are found to be year-dependent, suggesting an interaction with climatic conditions such as spring temperature, which is known have strong effects on the phenology of avian breeding. Thus, we hypothesized that ALAN and temperature interact to regulate timing of reproduction in wild birds. Field studies have suggested that sources of ALAN rich in short wavelengths can lead to stronger advances in egg-laying date. We therefore tested this hypothesis in the Great Tit (Parus major), using a replicated experimental set-up where eight previously unlit forest transects were illuminated with either white, green, or red LED light, or left dark as controls. We measured timing of egg laying for 619 breeding events spread over six consecutive years and obtained temperature data for all sites and years. We detected overall significantly earlier egg-laying dates in the white and green light vs. the dark treatment, and similar trends for red light. However, there was a strong interannual variability in mean egg-laying dates in all treatments, which was explained by spring temperature. We did not detect any fitness consequence of the changed timing of egg laying due to ALAN, which suggests that advancing reproduction in response to ALAN might be adaptive.  
  Address Plant Ecology and Nature Conservation Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands; davide.dominoni ( at ) glasgow.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Ecological Society of America Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31863538; PMCID:PMC7187248 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3311  
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Author Cavazzani, S.; Ortolani, S.; Bertolo, A.; Binotto, R.; Fiorentin, P.; Carraro, G.; Zitelli, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Satellite measurements of artificial light at night: aerosol effects Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 499 Issue 4 Pages 5075-5089  
  Keywords Instrumentation; atmospheric effects; detectors; light pollution; site testing; Aerosols  
  Abstract The study of artificial light at night (ALAN) by satellite is very important for the analysis of new astronomical sites and for the long-term temporal evolution observation of the emission from the ground. The analysis of satellite data presents many advantages but also some critical points because of fluctuations in measurements. The main result of this paper is the discovery of a correlation between these fluctuations and the aerosol concentration combined with cloud cover and lunar cycles. In this work, we also present a mathematical empirical model for the light pollution propagation study in relation to the aerosol concentration detected by satellite. We apply this model to the astronomical site of Asiago (Ekar Observatory) providing a possible explanation for the temporal ALAN fluctuations detected by satellite. Finally, we validate the results with the ground collected data.  
  Address Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova, Italy; stefano.cavazzani ( at ) unipd.it  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3310  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Secondi, J.; Davranche, A.; Théry, M.; Mondy, N.; Lengagne, T.; Isaac, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing the effects of artificial light at night on biodiversity across latitude – Current knowledge gaps Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Global Ecology and Biogeography Abbreviated Journal Global Ecol Biogeogr  
  Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 404-419  
  Keywords Ecology; ALAN; biogeography; exposure; global change; intertropical; latitude; light pollution  
  Abstract Aim

Exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) is a risk factor for organisms. Considering the spread and increasing intensity of night brightness across the globe, and the key role of light at all biological levels, alterations of ecosystems are expected. Yet, we cannot predict the severity of the effects of ALAN in several biomes because little information is available outside the temperate zone. We reviewed current knowledge and identified traits that could be targeted to fill this knowledge gap in order to contribute to the elaboration of a biogeographical framework for the study of ALAN at the global scale.

Location

Global.

Time period

Current and next decades.

Methods

We analysed the latitudinal variation in ALAN and focused on environmental factors that vary with latitude but that have been overlooked. We reviewed biological traits that exhibit latitudinal variation and depend on light and photoperiod and compiled information about the predicted changes in human demography and road networks across different world regions.

Results

Cloud cover amplifies ALAN far away from urbanized areas. Because of the higher frequency of overcast sky nights, exposure effects may be stronger both at high latitudes and across a large fraction of the intertropical zone, although at different times of the year. Intertropical biomes host the largest fraction of global biodiversity. Although currently they are not the most exposed to ALAN, their human populations are growing, and urbanized areas and road networks are expanding. Hence, ALAN could have strong ecological consequences, with cloud cover as an aggravating factor.

Perspectives

Knowledge gaps currently limit our ability to predict the effects of ALAN in different biomes. Therefore, it will be important to start investigating the consequences of this novel environmental factor across the globe, in order to develop a relevant theoretical framework.
 
  Address UMR 5023, Université de Lyon, Écologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés, Université Lyon 1, ENTPE, Villeurbanne, France; jean.secondi ( at ) univ-angers.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1466-822X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3309  
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