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Author Mills, W.; Martin, K.; Cathey, J. url  openurl
  Title Light and Lighting Basics for OSH Professionals Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Professional Safety Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 65 Issue 07 Pages 22-30  
  Keywords Review; Human Health; Lighting; Safety  
  Abstract Visible light is all around us, from sunlight to street lighting and automobile headlights to the backlight on a smartphone and in nearly every indoor space. Humans are so accustomed to working and living in artificial light that many of us have not stopped to consider the implications. Most OSH professionals’ experience with light and artificial lighting is likely limited to assessing whether sufficient light exists for people to see where they are going or carry out a task, or whether a light is too bright. This article aims to provide a current review of lighting for OSH professionals. Such a review is timely due to emerging issues including energy efficiency, human health impacts (e.g., blue light hazard, circadian rhythm disruption, fatigue), human performance (e.g., visual performance, visual comfort) and environmental impacts (e.g., light pollution).  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0099-0027 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3222  
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Author Reiter, R.J.; Sharma, R.; Ma, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Switching diseased cells from cytosolic aerobic glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation: A metabolic rhythm regulated by melatonin? Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages e12677  
  Keywords Commentary; Animals; Human Health; Alzheimer disease; Warburg metabolism; cancer; circadian rhythm; fibrosis; mitochondria  
  Abstract This commentary reviews the concept of the circadian melatonin rhythm playing an essential role in reducing the development of diseases such as solid tumors which adopt cytosolic aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) to support their enhanced metabolism. Experimental data show that solid mammary tumors depend on aerobic glycolysis during the day but likely revert to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation at night for ATP production. This conversion of diseased cells during the day to a healthier phenotype at night occurs under control of the circulating melatonin rhythm. When the nocturnal melatonin rise is inhibited by light exposure at night, cancer cells function in the diseased state 24/7. The ability of melatonin to switch cancer cells as well as other diseased cells, for example, Alzheimer disease, fibrosis, hyperactivation of macrophages, etc, from aerobic glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation may be a basic protective mechanism to reduce pathologies.  
  Address Department of Cell Systems and Anatomy, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32621295 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3221  
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Author Yin, J.; Qiu, Y.; Zhang, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Identification of Poverty Areas by Remote Sensing and Machine Learning: A Case Study in Guizhou, Southwest China Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 11  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract As an objective social phenomenon, poverty has accompanied the vicissitudes of human society, which is a chronic dilemma hindering human civilization. Remote sensing data, such as nighttime lights imagery, provides abundant poverty-related information that can be related to poverty. However, it may be insufficient to rely merely on nighttime lights data, because poverty is a comprehensive problem, and poverty identification may be affected by topography, especially in some developing countries or regions where agriculture accounts for a large proportion. Therefore, some geographical features may be necessary for supplements. With the support of the random forest machine learning method, we extracted 23 spatial features base on remote sensing including nighttime lights data and geographical data, and carried out the poverty identification in Guizhou Province, China, since 2012. Compared with the identifications using support vector machines and the artificial neural network, random forest showed a better accuracy. The results supported that nighttime lights and geographical features are better than those only by nighttime lights features. From 2012 to 2019, the identified poor counties in Guizhou Province showed obvious dynamic spatiotemporal characteristics. The number of poor counties has decreased consistently and contiguous poverty-stricken areas have fragmented; the number of poor counties in the northeast and southwest regions decreased faster than other areas. The reduction in poverty probability exhibited a pattern of spreading from the central and northern regions to the periphery parts. The poverty reduction was relatively slow in areas with large slope and large topographic relief. When poor counties are adjacent to more non-poor counties, they can get rid of poverty easier. This study provides a method for feature selection and recognition of poor counties by remote sensing images and offers new insights into poverty identification and regional sustainable development for other developing countries and areas.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2220-9964 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3220  
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Author Stefani, O.; Freyburger, M.; Veitz, S.; Basishvili, T.; Meyer, M.; Weibel, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Shirakawa, Y.; Cajochen, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Changing color and intensity of LED lighting across the day impacts on circadian melatonin rhythms and sleep in healthy men Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume in press Issue Pages e12714  
  Keywords Human health; Lighting; cognition; humans; male; melatonin; non-visual effects of light; sleep; wakefulness  
  Abstract We examined whether dynamically changing light across a scheduled 16-h waking day influences sleepiness, cognitive performance, visual comfort, melatonin secretion, and sleep under controlled laboratory conditions in healthy men. Fourteen participants underwent a 49-h laboratory protocol in a repeated-measures study design. They spent the first 5-h in the evening under standard lighting, followed by an 8-h nocturnal sleep episode at habitual bedtimes. Thereafter, volunteers either woke up to static light or to a dynamic light that changed spectrum and intensity across the scheduled 16-h waking day. Following an 8-h nocturnal sleep episode, the volunteers spent another 11-h either under static or dynamic light. Static light attenuated the evening rise in melatonin levels more compared to dynamic light as indexed by a significant reduction in the melatonin AUC prior to bedtime during static light only. Participants felt less vigilant in the evening during dynamic light. After dynamic light, sleep latency was significantly shorter in both the baseline and treatment night while sleep structure, sleep quality, cognitive performance and visual comfort did not significantly differ. The study shows that dynamic changes in spectrum and intensity of light promote melatonin secretion and sleep initiation in healthy men.  
  Address Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences (MCN), University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33378563 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3219  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, C.; Yang, W.; Tang, Q.; Tang, X.; Lei, J.; Wu, M.; Qiu, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Detection of Multidimensional Poverty Using Luojia 1-01 Nighttime Light Imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J Indian Soc Remote Sens  
  Volume 48 Issue 7 Pages 963-977  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Poverty is a complex social problem, and accurate poverty identification is a key step for creating strategies to eliminate poverty. The Luojia 1-01 satellite is part of a new generation of professional nighttime light remote sensing that was successfully launched on July 2, 2018, and has provided 130-m high-resolution nighttime light images for poverty studies. This study aimed to detect the accuracy of multidimensional poverty evaluation using Luojia 1-01 data at the county level. Drawing on a sustainable livelihood framework, the spatial patterns of multidimensional poverty were identified across Hubei province. The results found that there was a good correlation between the nighttime light index and the sustainable livelihoods index, and a second-order linear model had the best goodness of fit with a coefficient of determination of 0.88 and root mean square error of 0.03, indicating a good model performance. Counties affected by multidimensional poverty were mainly distributed in the west, northeast, and southeast of Hubei, and the agreement between the model results and counties identified by the government as impoverished was 73.08%. Due to its high-resolution and rich spatial information, Luojia 1-01 data can be used to efficiently and accurately identify the scale of multidimensional poverty at the county level and provide the relevant government departments with a scientific basis for implementing responsible and holistic poverty alleviation policies.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0255-660X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3218  
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