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Author Mouland, J.W.; Martial, F.; Watson, A.; Lucas, R.J.; Brown, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cones Support Alignment to an Inconsistent World by Suppressing Mouse Circadian Responses to the Blue Colors Associated with Twilight Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Current Biology Abbreviated Journal Current Biology  
  Volume 29 Issue 24 Pages 4260-4267.e4  
  Keywords Animals; Circadian Rhythm; mouse models; cones  
  Abstract In humans, short-wavelength light evokes larger circadian responses than longer wavelengths. This reflects the fact that melanopsin, a key contributor to circadian assessments of light intensity, most efficiently captures photons around 480 nm and gives rise to the popular view that ‘‘blue’’ light exerts the strongest effects on the clock. However, in the natural world, there is often no direct correlation be- tween perceived color (as reported by the cone-based visual system) and melanopsin excitation. Accordingly, although the mammalian clock does receive cone-based chromatic signals, the influence of color on circadian responses to light remains unclear. Here, we define the nature and functional significance of chromatic influences on the mouse circadian sys- tem. Using polychromatic lighting and mice with altered cone spectral sensitivity (Opn1mwR), we generate conditions that differ in color (i.e., ratio of L- to S-cone opsin activation) while providing identical melanopsin and rod activation. When biased toward S-opsin activation (appearing ‘‘blue’’), these stimuli reliably produce weaker circadian behavioral responses than those favoring L-opsin (‘‘yellow’’). This influence of color (which is absent in animals lacking cone phototransduction; Cnga3/) aligns with natural changes in spectral composition over twilight, where decreasing solar angle is accompanied by a strong blue shift. Accordingly, we find that naturalistic color changes support circadian alignment when environmental conditions render diurnal variations in light intensity weak/ambiguous sources of timing information. Our data thus establish how color contributes to circadian entrainment in mammals and provide important new insight to inform the design of lighting environments that benefit health.  
  Address Centre for Biological Timing, Faculty of Biology, Medicine & Health, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, UK; timothy.brown(at)manchester.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Cell Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 2785  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lapostolle, D.; Challéat, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lutter contre la pollution lumineuse: Trois processus de valorisation de l’obscurité dans les territoires français Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication VertigO Abbreviated Journal vertigo  
  Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords Society; Light pollution; France; Europe  
  Abstract The degradation of darkness through the use of artificial light at night (ALAN) in and around human infrastructures is termed light pollution. This pollution is intrinsically related to urbanization and spills out from urban areas to affect rural areas and protected areas. The fight against light pollution is being organized in several countries where local communities are experimenting with environmental policies to protect darkness. The challenge bears on both the preservation of biodiversity and the energy transition. In France, a few pioneering rural areas are experimenting with mechanisms that include this dual implication. Two of them provide the case study for this article. We show how these areas turn darkness into a specific resource. We identify three specification processes. The first, obeying an anthropocentric utilitarian rationale, is part of the “economicization” of the environment in the line of shallow ecology. The second, following a rationale of ecocentric conservation, is part of the radical greening of the economy, in line with deep ecology. The third follows an integrated social-ecological system rationale enshrining the interdependence between development and planning and the preservation of biodiversity and energy savings. Specification controversies beset local areas. These areas become incubation rooms, that is, spaces for resolving these controversies that are reflected in a transition operator enabling the local area to take a fresh trajectory in terms of development and planning.  
  Address Aménagement, UMR CNRS 6049 ThéMA, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 2 boulevard Gabriel, 21000 Dijon, France; dany.lapostolle(at)u-bourgogne.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language French Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1492-8442 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 2784  
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Author Shi, L.; Foody, G.M.; Boyd, D.S.; Girindran, R.; Wang, L.; Du, Y.; Ling, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night-time lights are more strongly related to urban building volume than to urban area Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Letters Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Letters  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 29-36  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Urban; Night Lights  
  Abstract A strong relationship between night-time light (NTL) data and the areal extent of urbanized regions has been observed frequently. As urban regions have an important vertical dimension, it is hypothesized that the strength of the relationship with NTL can be increased by consideration of the volume rather than simply the area of urbanized land. Relationships between NTL and the area and volume of urbanized land were determined for a set of towns and cities in the UK, the conterminous states of the USA and countries of the European Union. Strong relationships between NTL and the area urbanized were observed, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9282 to 0.9446. Higher correlation coefficients were observed for the relationship between NTL and urban building volume, ranging from 0.9548 to 0.9604; The difference in the correlations obtained with volume and with area was statistically significant at the 95% level of confidence. Studies using NTL data may be strengthened by consideration of the volume rather than just area of urbanized land.  
  Address Key Laboratory for Environment and Disaster Monitoring and Evaluation, Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China; shilingfei14(at)mails.ucas.ac.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2150-704X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 2783  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bará, S.; Falchi, F.; Furgoni, R.; Lima, R.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Fast Fourier-transform calculation of artificial night sky brightness maps Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 240 Issue Pages 106658  
  Keywords Skyglow; Light pollution; Atmospheric optics; Photometry; Radiometry; Fourier transforms  
  Abstract Light pollution poses a growing threat to optical astronomy, in addition to its detrimental impacts on the natural environment, the intangible heritage of humankind related to the contemplation of the starry sky and, potentially, on human health. The computation of maps showing the spatial distribution of several light pollution related functions (e.g. the anthropogenic zenithal night sky brightness, or the average brightness of the celestial hemisphere) is a key tool for light pollution monitoring and control, providing the scientific rationale for the adoption of informed decisions on public lighting and astronomical site preservation. The calculation of such maps from satellite radiance data for wide regions of the planet with sub-kilometric spatial resolution often implies a huge amount of basic pixel operations, requiring in many cases extremely large computation times. In this paper we show that, using adequate geographical projections, a wide set of light pollution map calculations can be reframed in terms of two-dimensional convolutions that can be easily evaluated using conventional fast Fourier-transform (FFT) algorithms, with typical computation times smaller than 10^-6 s per output pixel.  
  Address Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain; salva.bara(at)usc.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 2782  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jiang, J.; He, Y.; Kou, H.; Ju, Z.; Gao, X.; Zhao, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effects of artificial light at night on Eurasian tree sparrow (Passer montanus): Behavioral rhythm disruption, melatonin suppression and intestinal microbiota alterations Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators  
  Volume 108 Issue Pages 105702  
  Keywords Animals; Artificial light at night; Eurasian tree sparrow; Melatonin; Intestinal microbiota  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) or light pollution is rapidly widespread with fast urbanization and becomes an obvious environmental disturbance. Recent studies showed ALAN has multiple negative impacts on a wide range of species including bird biological rhythm disruption, behavioral and physiological disturbance and hormone secretion disorder. However, its effects on bird gut microbiota are scarcely studied. In this study, we used Eurasian tree sparrow (Passer montanus), a widely distributed and locally abundant bird species in both urban and rural areas of China to examine the effects of ALAN on locomotor activity rhythm and melatonin secretion, and species diversity and community structure of intestinal microbiota by simulating urban and rural night light environment. Our results showed ALAN strongly affected circadian rhythm of locomotor activity with earlier start of activity before light-on and later rest after light-off. Moreover, ALAN significantly suppressed melatonin release. Last but not least, ALAN profoundly affected taxonomic compositions, species diversity and community structure of intestinal microbiota of birds. We concluded that ALAN may cause bird health damage by disrupting circadian rhythm, inhibiting melatonin release and altering intestinal microbiota. Melatonin hormone level and intestinal microbiota diversity may be important bioindicators for light pollution.  
  Address College of Life Sciences, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 2781  
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