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Author Baeza Moyano, D.; San Juan Fernández, M.; González Lezcano, R.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Towards a Sustainable Indoor Lighting Design: Effects of Artificial Light on the Emotional State of Adolescents in the Classroom Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 12 Issue 10 Pages 4263  
  Keywords Human Health; *Conservation of Natural Resources; visual comfort; artificial lighting; indoor lighting design; chronodisruption; circadian rhythms; daylighting; sustainable lighting design; LED luminaires; indoor environment quality; classroom lighting  
  Abstract In recent years, articles have been published on the non-visual effects of light, specifically the light emitted by the new luminaires with light emitting diodes (LEDs) and by the screens of televisions, computer equipment, and mobile phones. Professionals from the world of optometry have raised the possibility that the blue part of the visible light from sources that emit artificial light could have pernicious effects on the retina. The aim of this work is to analyze the articles published on this subject, and to use existing information to elucidate the spectral composition and irradiance of new LED luminaires for use in the home and in public spaces such as educational centers, as well as considering the consequences of the light emitted by laptops for teenagers. The results of this research show that the amount of blue light emitted by electronic equipment is lower than that emitted by modern luminaires and thousands of times less than solar irradiance. On the other hand, the latest research warns that these small amounts of light received at night can have pernicious non-visual effects on adolescents. The creation of new LED luminaires for interior lighting, including in educational centers, where the intensity of blue light can be increased without any specific legislation for its control, makes regulatory developments imperative due to the possible repercussions on adolescents with unknown and unpredictable consequences.  
  Address Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Universidad San Pablo CEU, Campus Montepríncipe, Boadilla del Monte, 28925 Madrid, Spain; baezams ( at ) ceu.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3381  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Moaraf, S.; Heiblum, R.; Vistoropsky, Y.; Okuliarova, M.; Zeman, M.; Barnea, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night Increases Recruitment of New Neurons and Differentially Affects Various Brain Regions in Female Zebra Finches Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci  
  Volume 21 Issue 17 Pages  
  Keywords Medial striatum (MSt); Nidopallium caudale (NC); artificial light at night (ALAN); birds; brain plasticity; hippocampus (HC); melatonin; neuronal densities; new neuronal recruitment; zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)  
  Abstract Despite growing evidence that demonstrate adverse effects of artificial light at night (ALAN) on many species, relatively little is known regarding its effects on brain plasticity in birds. We recently showed that although ALAN increases cell proliferation in brains of birds, neuronal densities in two brain regions decreased, indicating neuronal death, which might be due to mortality of newly produced neurons or of existing ones. Therefore, in the present study we studied the effect of long-term ALAN on the recruitment of newborn neurons into their target regions in the brain. Accordingly, we exposed zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) to 5 lux ALAN, and analysed new neuronal recruitment and total neuronal densities in several brain regions. We found that ALAN increased neuronal recruitment, possibly as a compensatory response to ALAN-induced neuronal death, and/or due to increased nocturnal locomotor activity caused by sleep disruption. Moreover, ALAN also had a differential temporal effect on neuronal densities, because hippocampus was more sensitive to ALAN and its neuronal densities were more affected than in other brain regions. Nocturnal melatonin levels under ALAN were significantly lower compared to controls, indicating that very low ALAN intensities suppress melatonin not only in nocturnal, but also in diurnal species.  
  Address Department of Natural and Life Sciences, The Open University of Israel, Ra'anana 43710, Israel; stanmoaraf ( at ) mail.tau.ac.il  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32858878; PMCID:PMC7503983 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3380  
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Author Yang, Y.; Liu, Q.; Wang, T.; Pan, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wavelength-specific artificial light disrupts molecular clock in avian species: A power-calibrated statistical approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 265 Issue Pt B Pages 114206  
  Keywords Animals; *CLOCK Proteins; Chickens; Circadian Rhythm; Light; *Melatonin; Reproducibility of Results; Avian species; Clock genes; Light pollution; Melatonin; Spectral sensitivity  
  Abstract Nighttime lighting is an increasingly important anthropogenic environmental stress on plants and animals. Exposure to unnatural lighting environments may disrupt the circadian rhythm of organisms. However, the sample size of relevant studies, e.g. disruption of the molecular circadian clock by light pollution, was small (<10), which led to low statistical power and difficulties in replicating prior results. Here, we developed a power-calibrated statistical approach to overcome these weaknesses. The results showed that the effect size of 2.48 in clock genes expression induced by artificial light would ensure the reproducibility of the results as high as 80%. Long-wavelength light (560-660nm) entrained expressions of the positive core clock genes (e.g. cClock) and negative core clock genes (e.g. cCry1, cPer2) in robust circadian rhythmicity, whereas those clock genes were arrhythmic in short-wavelength light (380-480nm). Further, we found artificial light could entrain the transcriptional-translational feedback loop of the molecular clock in a wavelength-dependent manner. The expression of the positive core clock genes (cBmal1, cBmal2 and cClock), cAanat gene and melatonin were the highest in short-wavelength light and lowest in long-wavelength light. For the negative regulators of the molecular clock (cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3), the expression of which was the highest in long-wavelength light and lowest in short-wavelength light. Our statistical approach opens new opportunities to understand and strengthen conclusions, comparing with the studies with small sample sizes. We also provide comprehensive insight into the effect of wavelength-specific artificial light on the circadian rhythm of the molecular clock in avian species. Especially, the global lighting is shifting from “yellow” sodium lamps, which is more like the long-wavelength light, toward short-wavelength light (blue light)-enriched “white” light-emitting diodes (LEDs).  
  Address Department of Biosystems Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, China. panhouse ( at ) zju.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32599326 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3379  
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Author Steell, S.C.; Cooke, S.J.; Eliason, E.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night does not alter heart rate or locomotor behaviour in Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus): insights into light pollution and physiological disturbance using biologgers Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Conservation Physiology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Physiol  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages coaa097  
  Keywords Animals; accelerometer; biologging; heart rate; light pollution; spiny lobster; stress  
  Abstract Light pollution is a rapidly growing threat to biodiversity, with many unknown or poorly understood effects on species and ecosystems spanning terrestrial and aquatic environments. Relative to other taxa, the effects of artificial light at night on aquatic invertebrates are poorly understood, despite the abundance and integral significance of invertebrates to marine and freshwater ecosystems. We affixed heart rate and acceleration biologgers to adult Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus), an ecologically, culturally and economically significant species in the western Atlantic ocean, to test the effect of artificial light at night on this species' physiology and behaviour relative to appropriate controls. The experiment was conducted in a simulated reef mesocosm in The Bahamas with incandescent lighting used to illuminate it at 1 lux, approximating light levels offshore of urban areas. In the conditions tested here, artificial light at night was found to have no effect on heart rate or locomotor activity in P. argus. We observed a dissociation between activity and heart rate at both short-term and long-term temporal scales. Lobsters were more active at night and nocturnal activity was higher in trials closer to new moon; however, heart rate did not vary with diel or lunar cycle. There was less than 8% difference between daytime and night time average heart rate despite the average percentage of time spent active almost tripling in nights versus days, to 19.5% from 7.2%, respectively. Our findings suggest P. argus may have some resilience to low levels of light pollution, which warrants further research on aspects of this species' life history, performance and fitness in the face of this potential anthropogenic disturbance.  
  Address Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA; steell ( at ) ualberta.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2051-1434 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33304586; PMCID:PMC7720088 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3378  
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Author Challéat, S.; Barré, K.; Laforge, A.; Lapostolle, D.; Franchomme, M.; Sirami, C.; Le Viol, I.; Milian, J.; Kerbiriou, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Grasping darkness: the dark ecological network as a social-ecological framework to limit the impacts of light pollution on biodiversity Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Ecology and Society Abbreviated Journal E&S  
  Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Ecology; artificial light at night; darkness; ecological network; land-use planning; light pollution; multilevel approach; participatory processes; social-ecological systems  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is nowadays recognized as a major anthropogenic pressure on the environment on a global scale and as such is called light pollution. Through its attractive or deterrent effects, and its disruption of the biological clock for many animal and plant taxa, ALAN is increasingly recognized as a major threat to global biodiversity, which ultimately alters the amount, the quality, and the connectivity of available habitats for taxa. Biodiversity conservation tools should, therefore, include ALAN spatial and temporal effects. The ecological network, i.e., the physical and functional combination of natural elements that promote habitat connectivity, provides a valuable framework for that purpose. Understood as a social-ecological framework, it offers the opportunity to take into account the multiple uses of nocturnal spaces and times, by humans and nonhumans alike. Here we present the concept of “dark ecological network.” We show this concept is able to grasp the effects of ALAN in terms of habitat disturbances and integrates temporal dimensions of ecological processes into biodiversity conservation planning. Moreover, it is also intended to trivialize the practices of darkness protection by turning them into the ordinary practices of land use planning. From an operational point of view, the challenge is to translate the levers for reducing ALAN-induced effects into a political method for its “territorialization.” To achieve this objective, we propose a course of action that consists of building an interdisciplinary repertoire of contextualized knowledge (e.g., impacts on wildlife, human/lightscape relationship, existing legal tools, etc.), in order to deduce from it a number of practical supports for the governance of the dark ecological network in response to societal and ecological issues.  
  Address University of Toulouse-Jean Jaurès 5 allées Antonio-Machado 31058 Toulouse Cedex 9, France; samuel.challeat ( at ) univ-tlse2.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Ecology and Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1708-3087 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3377  
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