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Author Kitahashi, T.; Kurokawa, D.; Ogiso, S.; Suzuki, N.; Ando, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-induced and circadian expressions of melanopsin genes opn4xa and opn4xb in the eyes of juvenile grass puffer Takifugu alboplumbeus Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Fish Physiology and Biochemistry Abbreviated Journal Fish Physiol Biochem  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Biological clock; Circadian rhythm; Diurnal rhythm; Light; Melanopsin; Photoreceptor  
  Abstract Animals regulate a variety of aspects of physiology according to environmental light conditions via nonvisual opsins such as melanopsin. In order to study photic regulation of fish physiology, expression changes of the genes for melanopsin (opn4xa and opn4xb) and effects of light on them were examined in juvenile grass puffer Takifugu alboplumbeus using quantitative real-time PCR. In the brain of juvenile fish, no significant diurnal nor circadian changes were observed in opn4x mRNA levels. On the other hand, in the eyes, the mRNA level of opn4xa showed a significant diurnal rhythm with a peak at Zeitgeber time (ZT) 4, while no apparent circadian changes were observed. The mRNA level of opn4xb in the eyes showed a diurnal change similar to that of opn4xa, while it showed a significant circadian change. Furthermore, continuous exposure to light during a subjective night significantly increased the mRNA levels of opn4xa in the eyes at ZT24, suggesting that light induces gene expression of opn4xa in the eyes and that the induction occurs only during the night-day transition period. These results suggest that Opn4xa and Opn4xb play differential roles in the eyes of juvenile grass puffer to mediate the physiological effects of environmental light information.  
  Address Sado Marine Biological Station, Sado Island Center for Ecological Sustainability, Niigata University, 87 Tassha, Sado-shi, Niigata, 952-2135, Japan  
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  ISSN 0920-1742 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33559801 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3353  
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Author Rajput, S.; Naithani, M.; Meena, K.; Rana, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution: hidden perils in light and links to cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Sleep Vigilance Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Review; Human Health  
  Abstract Light pollution is a rising global concern which impacts not only ecology but has a wide range of deleterious effect on human health as well. Artificial light at night (ALAN) has been linked to increased risk of cancers including shift workers at night. Apart from cancer, ALAN has been the cause of disrupted circadian rhythm, disturbances in sleep pattern, obesity, stress, alterations in the rhythmicity of gut microbiota and free radical damage. Melatonin, a wonder molecule dubbed as the hormone of darkness, appears to be involved in a plethora of physiological processes and abnormalities including control of sleep, circadian rhythms, retinal physiology, seasonal reproductive cycles, cancer development and growth, immune activity, antioxidation and free radical scavenging. Potential detrimental effects of artificial light are not known to all, hidden perils of light are yet to be brought in full public knowledge so that nighttime light can be dealt with effectively.  
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  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3352  
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Author Lang, W.; Pan, M.; Wu, J.; Chen, T.; Li, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The patterns and driving forces of uneven regional growth in ASEAN countries: A tale of two Thailands' path toward regional coordinated development Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Growth and Change Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Uneven development has long been a critical issue in geography and urban studies, leading to economically inefficient urbanization, environmentally unbalanced regions, and socially unequal livelihoods. As one result, primate cities and urban primacy form within a hierarchical urban system, to which urban and regional planning must positively respond. It is worth noting that Thailand has experienced a number of important urbanization issues related to developing countries, such as semicolonialism and internal colonialism. This study aims to investigate regional uneven development based on primacy theory and the rank‐size rule, which are common in most Asian and developing countries. We examined the urbanization processes in Thailand, from 2000 to 2015, by looking at factors of population, GDP, land use, transportation networks, and nighttime light, which provide very recent regional development patterns. The second set of analyses explained the degree of primacy among different provinces and their ranking hierarchies. By presenting the persistent disparities of contemporary urbanization in Thailand and exploring its driving forces, this study offers insights into planning and policy and underscores the importance of regional coordinated development for achieving sustainable urbanization in Southeast Asian countries.  
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  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3351  
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Author Dar, A. A., Jamal, K. url  openurl
  Title THE DECLINE OF MOTHS GLOBALLY: A REVIEW OF POSSIBLE CAUSES Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Munis Entomology and Zoology Journal Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 310-319  
  Keywords Review; Animals  
  Abstract The dramatic increase in decline of moths constitutes a great threat to ecosystem, leads to biodiversity crisis of moths. Loss of moth diversity has been inadequately quantified because of nocturnal nature of moths. The substantial decline of moths has been reported in various countries such as U.K, U.S, Germany, Sweden, India, Netherlands, Siberia and New Zealand. 31%, 44%, 27% and 71% of moths declined in Great Britain, Southern Britain, Sweden and Netherlands respectively. Collapsing of moths is a prime concern, because they serve as food for wide range of taxa, such as birds, bats, spiders and reptiles. While as, moth larvae are fed on by insects, bacteria and fungi. The various major potential drivers responsible for causing dwindling of moth population are destruction of habitat, climatic change, intensification of agriculture, urbanization, chemical pollution, artificial light pollution and invasion of non-native species. In this article, overall review on the global decline of moths is discussed, including the preventive measures and future perspective.  
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  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3350  
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Author Ditmer, M.A.; Iannarilli, F.; Tri, A.N.; Garshelis, D.L.; Carter, N.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial night light helps account for observer bias in citizen science monitoring of an expanding large mammal population Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol  
  Volume 90 Issue 2 Pages 330-342  
  Keywords Animals; Remote sensing; bears; human-wildlife interactions; occupancy model; range expansion; spatial bias; species monitoring  
  Abstract The integration of citizen scientists into ecological research is transforming how, where, and when data are collected, and expanding the potential scales of ecological studies. Citizen-science projects can provide numerous benefits for participants while educating and connecting professionals with lay audiences, potentially increasing the acceptance of conservation and management actions. However, for all the benefits, collection of citizen-science data is often biased towards areas that are easily accessible (e.g. developments and roadways), and thus data are usually affected by issues typical of opportunistic surveys (e.g. uneven sampling effort). These areas are usually illuminated by artificial light at night (ALAN), a dynamic sensory stimulus that alters the perceptual world for both humans and wildlife. Our goal was to test whether satellite-based measures of ALAN could improve our understanding of the detection process of citizen-scientist-reported sightings of a large mammal. We collected observations of American black bears Ursus americanus (n = 1,315) outside their primary range in Minnesota, USA, as part of a study to gauge population expansion. Participants from the public provided sighting locations of bears on a website. We used an occupancy modelling framework to determine how well ALAN accounted for observer metrics compared to other commonly used metrics (e.g. housing density). Citizen scientists reported 17% of bear sightings were under artificially lit conditions and monthly ALAN estimates did the best job accounting for spatial bias in detection of all observations, based on AIC values and effect sizes ( beta ^ = 0.81, 0.71-0.90 95% CI). Bear detection increased with elevated illuminance; relative abundance was positively associated with natural cover, proximity to primary bear range and lower road density. Although the highest counts of bear sightings occurred in the highly illuminated suburbs of the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan region, we estimated substantially higher bear abundance in another region with plentiful natural cover and low ALAN (up to ~375% increased predicted relative abundance) where observations were sparse. We demonstrate the importance of considering ALAN radiance when analysing citizen-scientist-collected data, and we highlight the ways that ALAN data provide a dynamic snapshot of human activity.  
  Address School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:32895962 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3349  
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