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Author Aulsebrook, A.E.; Johnsson, R.D.; Lesku, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light, Sleep and Performance in Diurnal Birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 115-131  
  Keywords Review; Animals  
  Abstract Sleep has a multitude of benefits and is generally considered necessary for optimal performance. Disruption of sleep by extended photoperiods, moonlight and artificial light could therefore impair performance in humans and non-human animals alike. Here, we review the evidence for effects of light on sleep and subsequent performance in birds. There is accumulating evidence that exposure to natural and artificial sources of light regulates and suppresses sleep in diurnal birds. Sleep also benefits avian cognitive performance, including during early development. Nevertheless, multiple studies suggest that light can prolong wakefulness in birds without impairing performance. Although there is still limited research on this topic, these results raise intriguing questions about the adaptive value of sleep. Further research into the links between light, sleep and performance, including the underlying mechanisms and consequences for fitness, could shed new light on sleep evolution and urban ecology.  
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  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3328  
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Author Zhong, C.; Franklin, M.; Wiemels, J.; McKean-Cowdin, R.; Chung, N.T.; Benbow, J.; Wang, S.S.; Lacey, J.V.J.; Longcore, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor artificial light at night and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma among women in the California Teachers Study cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Cancer Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol  
  Volume 69 Issue Pages 101811  
  Keywords Human Health; Skyglow; Circadian disruption; Cohort study; Light at night; Non-Hodgkin lymphoma  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Outdoor artificial light at night (ALAN) has been implicated in a growing number of adverse health outcomes. ALAN is believed to disrupt circadian rhythms and has been associated with increased inflammation, one of the hallmarks of cancer. We examined the association between outdoor ALAN and a cancer strongly associated with autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), in the prospective California Teachers Study cohort. METHODS: Outdoor ALAN was assigned to participant addresses at study baseline (1995-96) through use of the New World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness. Among 105,937 women followed from 1995 to 2015, linkage to the California Cancer Registry identified 873 incident cases of NHL. Age-stratified Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 %CI) for overall NHL and the most common NHL subtypes; diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL). Multivariate analyses adjusted for previously reported subtype specific covariates (e.g. body mass index (BMI) for DLBCL). RESULTS: Compared to the lowest quintile, participants residing in the highest quintile of outdoor ALAN at baseline were more likely to develop NHL (HR = 1.32, 95 %CI = 1.07-1.63), and, in particular, DLBCL (HR = 1.87, 95 %CI = 1.16-3.02). The elevated risk for DLBCL remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, BMI, and socioeconomic status (DLBCL:HR = 1.87, 95 %CI = 1.16-3.02, NHL:HR = 1.32, 95 %CI = 1.07-1.63). There was no association between ALAN and FL or CLL/SLL. CONCLUSION: DLBCL risk was elevated among women residing in neighborhoods with greater outdoor ALAN. Future research in circadian disruption and DLBCL may clarify potential biological processes implicated in this association.  
  Address Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1877-7821 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33002844; PMCID:PMC7710554 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3327  
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Author Coogan, A.N.; Cleary-Gaffney, M.; Finnegan, M.; McMillan, G.; Gonzalez, A.; Espey, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Perceptions of Light Pollution and its Impacts: Results of an Irish Citizen Science Survey Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 15 Pages  
  Keywords Psychology; Perception; Skyglow  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Light pollution is increasingly an area of concern for health and quality of life research. Somewhat surprisingly, there are relatively few descriptions of perceptions of light pollution in the literature. The current study examined such perceptions in a Irish sample. METHODS: A survey was circulated as part of a citizen science initiative of a national newspaper; the survey included questions regarding night sky brightness and the impact of light at night on sleep and animal behaviour. Complete responses from 462 respondents were analysed. RESULTS: Urban location was, as anticipated, associated with reported brighter night skies, and public lighting was reported as the main source of light at night for urban settings, whilst neighbours' domestic lighting was the most commonly reported source for rural settings. Respondents from rural settings were more likely to report that light at night impinged on sleep, whilst city dwellers were more likely to report recent changes in wildlife behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: Citizen science approaches may be useful in gathering data on public perceptions of light pollution and its impacts. In the current study, this perception was strongly influenced by location, highlighting the importance of assessing experiences and attitudes across a number of geographical settings.  
  Address School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland  
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  ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32759883; PMCID:PMC7432530 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3326  
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Author Walbeek, T.J.; Harrison, E.M.; Gorman, M.R.; Glickman, G.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Naturalistic Intensities of Light at Night: A Review of the Potent Effects of Very Dim Light on Circadian Responses and Considerations for Translational Research Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front. Neurol.  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Review; Human health; animals; mammals  
  Abstract n this review, we discuss the remarkable potency and potential applications of a form of light that is often overlooked in a circadian context: naturalistic levels of dim light at night (nLAN), equivalent to intensities produced by the moon and stars. It is often assumed that such low levels of light do not produce circadian responses typically associated with brighter light levels. A solid understanding of the impacts of very low light levels is complicated further by the broad use of the somewhat ambiguous term “dim light,” which has been used to describe light levels ranging seven orders of magnitude. Here, we lay out the argument that nLAN exerts potent circadian effects on numerous mammalian species, and that given conservation of anatomy and function, the efficacy of light in this range in humans warrants further investigation. We also provide recommendations for the field of chronobiological research, including minimum requirements for the measurement and reporting of light, standardization of terminology (specifically as it pertains to “dim” light), and ideas for reconsidering old data and designing new studies.  
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  ISSN 1664-2295 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3325  
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Author Ebbensgaard, C. L.; Edensor, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Walking with light and the discontinuous experience of urban change Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers Abbreviated Journal Trans Inst Br Geogr.  
  Volume Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Society; Psychology; Darkness  
  Abstract This paper is concerned with the affective power of light, darkness, and illumination and their role in exposing and obscuring processes of rapid urban change. Little academic attention has focused on how lighting informs multiple, overlapping, and intersecting urban temporalities and mediates our experience of an ever‐changing city. This paper foregrounds a walk through the illuminated city at night as an epistemic opportunity to develop an embodied account of material and temporal change in ways that disrupt the aesthetic organisation of the sensible world at night. By detailing the discontinuous experience of walking through differently lit spaces, the paper develops novel ways of conceptualising the experience of urban change that unsettle common understandings of subjectivity, temporality, and the city. The paper draws on a single night's walk from Canning Town to Canary Wharf in east London – an area that has recently undergone rapid change, including the erection of enclaves of high‐rise development. By accentuating the shared experiences of walking with light, we reveal the affective capacities of light and dark to conceal and expose wider material, embodied, and temporal urban changes but also how we might challenge the organisation of the nocturnal field of the sensible.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3324  
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