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Author Elvidge, C.D.; Ghosh, T.; Hsu, F.-C.; Zhizhin, M.; Bazilian, M.
Title The Dimming of Lights in China during the COVID-19 Pandemic Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 17 Pages 2851
Keywords Remote Sensing; VIIRS; Day-night band (DNB); Nighttime lights; COVID-19; Pandemic; VIIRS-DNB
Abstract A satellite survey of the cumulative radiant emissions from electric lighting across China reveals a large radiance decline in lighting from December 2019 to February 2020—the peak of the lockdown established to suppress the spread of COVID-19 infections. To illustrate the changes, an analysis was also conducted on a reference set from a year prior to the pandemic. In the reference period, the majority (62%) of China’s population lived in administrative units that became brighter in March 2019 relative to December 2018. The situation reversed in February 2020, when 82% of the population lived in administrative units where lighting dimmed as a result of the pandemic. The dimming has also been demonstrated with difference images for the reference and pandemic image pairs, scattergrams, and a nightly temporal profile. The results indicate that it should be feasible to monitor declines and recovery in economic activity levels using nighttime lighting as a proxy.
Address Earth Observation Group, Payne Institute for Public Policy, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401, USA; celvidge(at)mines.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3134
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Author Figueiro, M.G.; Nagare, R.; Price, L.L.A.
Title Non-visual effects of light: How to use light to promote circadian entrainment and elicit alertness Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 38-62
Keywords Human Health; Lighting
Abstract In addition to stimulating the visual system, light incident on the retina stimulates other biological functions, also referred to as non-visual responses. Among the most notable biological functions are human circadian rhythms, which are bodily rhythms that, in constant darkness, oscillate with a period close to, but typically slightly longer than 24 hours. Twenty-four-hour light–dark patterns incident on the retina are the major synchroniser of circadian rhythms to the local time on Earth. Entrainment of circadian rhythms has been implicated in health and well-being. Light can also elicit an acute alerting effect on people, similar to a ‘cup of coffee.’ This review summarises the literature on how light affects entrainment and alertness and how it can be used to achieve these aims.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3133
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Author Ford, S.; Kidd, P.; Nashand, K.; Rietveld, A.
Title ARTIFICIAL LIGHT AND MOTH BIODIVERSITY: A COMPARISON OF MOTH DIVERSITY ACROSS DIFFERENT HABITATS ON LUNDY TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECT OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHT Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Lundy Field Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue Pages 53-68
Keywords Animals; Lundy; Moths
Abstract Moths perform important roles within ecosystems. Behavioural responses to artificial light disrupt adaptive behaviours, causing population declines. Island populations can assess moth population attracted to artificial light, distinct from urbanisation. Here we present results from day counts of moth larvae and nocturnal Skinner light-traps from Lundy. Findings reveal a significant difference between moth population dynamics and species at differing locations.Overall, numbers of individuals and species caught with the UV-light trap were significantly greater than LED sources.These findings can be applied to potential artificial light changes on Lundy, as well as further changes throughout the United Kingdom
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3132
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Author Peng, J.; Lin, H.; Chen, Y.; Blaschke, T.; Luo, L.; Xu, Z.; Hu, Y.’na; Zhao, M.; Wu, J.
Title Spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations in China during 2000–2012: a nighttime light approach Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol
Volume 35 Issue 2 Pages 421-434
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Context

Urban agglomeration is an advanced spatial organization of cities, usually caused by urbanization processes when cities develop to a certain level – typically associated with higher population density and a certain density of built environment. However, compared with various studies focusing on specific cities, urban agglomerations are still understudied, especially for the quantitative identification of spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations.

Objectives

This study aims to identify the boundary of urban agglomerations in China from 2000 to 2012, and to explore the temporal evolution and spatial difference of urban agglomerations.

Methods

Firstly, the core zone of urban agglomerations was identified using an appropriate threshold of the digital number (DN) of nighttime light. Secondly, the mean patch area and gravity model were used to determine the affected zone of urban agglomerations. Thirdly, spatiotemporal contrast was conducted focusing on the 23 main urban agglomerations in China.

Results

By 2012, the most highly developed Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta urban agglomerations met the standard of world level, with the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei urban agglomeration for regional level, as well as 11 urban agglomerations for sub-regional level. Regional differences in urban agglomerations between southern and northern China, or between coastal and inland China remained stable over the study period of 2000–2012. Compared with the western urban agglomerations, the outward expansion of eastern urban agglomerations decelerated. From 2000 to 2012, the overall development mode of urban agglomerations shifted from the core-expansion to the peripheral-development, together with slower expansion of urban agglomerations after 2006.

Conclusions

Nighttime light data are effective in exploring the spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3131
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Author Richardson, M.E.S.; Parkins, S.; Kaneza, I.; Dauphin, A.-C.
Title Jet Lag Recovery and Memory Functions Are Correlated with Direct Light Effects on Locomotion Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume in press Issue Pages 748730420947589
Keywords Animals; activity; behavior; entrainment; jet lag; light therapy; masking; memory
Abstract Jet lag is a circadian disruption that affects millions of people, resulting, among other things, in extreme sleepiness and memory loss. The hazardous implications of such effects are evident in situations in which focus and attention are required. Remarkably, there is a limited understanding of how jet lag recovery and associated memory loss vary year round under different photoperiods. Here we show, using different cycles representing winter, summer, and equinox in male mice, that jet lag recovery and memory vary significantly with photoperiod changes. We uncover a positive correlation of acute light effects on circadian-driven locomotion (known as negative masking) with photoentrainment speed and memory enhancement during jet lag. Specifically, we show that enhancing or reducing negative masking is correlated with better or worse memory performance, respectively. This study indicates that in addition to timed-light exposure for phase shifting, the negative masking response could also be biologically relevant when designing effective treatments of jet lag.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, Oakwood University, Huntsville, Alabama
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32877295 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3130
Permanent link to this record